1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Bubbles & Me's Avatar
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    First time on a single track trail

    First of all I am not in as good of shape as I thought I was.
    When I was up here it was all up hill to this point. I was thinking I went to far. I was way to tired and would never make it back home.
    Wondering if my dog could drag me out or if anyone would ever find my bones.


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    Then I made it down to the singletrack trail and rode down it like a big P U S S Y!!!.
    Had to get off and walk bike a couple off times.
    Fell over a couple times not a wipe out, just fell over like an old lady while trying not to wipe out.
    I may have even screamed a couple of times like a little girl
    My dog lost all respect for me.


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    Finaly made it down!!



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    I need a lot of practice
    Pretty sure I will be real sore tomorrow but can;t wait to try it again in a couple of days
    Last edited by Bubbles & Me; 04-20-2007 at 03:30 PM.

  2. #2
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    Reputation: Fairchild's Avatar
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    Keep at it you'll be flying through there before you know it.

  3. #3
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    No shame in getting off the bike sometimes. Everyone has a limit about what they can actually ride cleanly over, and while it is good to push on that limit, you're a lot better off doing it over a longer time.

    But once you've got sections of the trail down, it is a lot more fun that riding on a road. Where I am, it is a lot closer to ridign a rollercoaster, in fact.

  4. #4
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    sounds a lot like my experiences so far ...tee hee. The way i see it though, is that the guy sitting on his couch day in and day out is a bigger p***sy. At leat we're out there tryin' it!

  5. #5
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    Hey, I'm still trying to get the concrete bike path thing down. I'd say good job, probably alot harder than it looks. I need a little more time to get in shape before I try that.

  6. #6
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    Beautiful area. Just think of it this way, atleast you didn't hit any of those tree's. I've had a couple occasions where they've come to close for comfort.
    "If I am cut, do I not bleed?" -Kane

  7. #7
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    It will take some time to get your fitness level to where you want/need it to be. This is only natural.

    It is most likely that the sections that looked too difficult or scary on your first visit will seem much easier after 3 or 4 or 10 visits. However for me there are sections I do not want too try and clear even after 30 visits.
    I have decided that they are too dangerous and don't care about attempting them. This sits perfectly well with me and I have no problem with getting off and walking it a few meters.

    It's good to know your limits and not take on too much too soon.
    Not much for a man to ask I dare say.. the simple maturity to ensure a limitless supply of clean socks.

  8. #8
    2006 Yeti AS-X
    Reputation: Lawson Raider's Avatar
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    I started riding in 2006, I rode the asphalt/concrete stuff all year but kept eyeing the singletrack. This year, I have ventured on the singletrack but like earlier posters said, don't be ashamed to walk what you think you can't do. I got off this morning for a huge log because I know my bunnyhop skills plain suck so I'd rather off the bike, carry it over, than try to do something I knew I couldn't do and wreck. I would safely presume no one on the board here likes to wreck. Even though sooner or later, if you ride the trails enough, you will end up doing that in some degree of fashion. Heck, when I rode the track today, I had my roadie tires on my Hardrock (got 2 sets of tires, 1 for singletrack, and 1 for asphalt; the asphalt tires are kevlar so I wasn't worried about punctures but being that they are slick in the middle well.....).

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