1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    43

    First time out in 10 years.....

    Ok... So I know I need to get into shape and I cant do a gym membership again. Its just wasted money if I dont go, and I have nothing to show for it. I biked as a kid for years and years and years. I grew up in the country and I always remember how much I enjoyed it. I got a cheap wally world bike still in the box. I found out the hard way while on the trail that I didn't tighten the handlebars or the seat well enough. Also I am a big guy and quite overweight. I was out of breath multiple times.... I am sick with a cold at the moment but knew it was my only chance to go out for a while..... well...... I loved it.... even with equipment malfunctions I loved it. I can also say I am not a fan of gripshift as I hit that a few more times then I like.... But this is a start for me. Its a beginning to a healthier lifestyle. I am trying to eat better and that cheap $100 mountain bike is my start. Can't wait to post more.

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation: MrMook's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    290

    Congratulations

    Stick with it and you'll have even more fun.
    Invest in a set of tools, if you don't have a set already. Part of the fun is working on your bike, and as you've noticed, you may have a little more work to do to get that rig solid. Once you have it all adjusted right, just keep at it, and enjoy yourself.
    Soon enough you'll be scraping some dough together for a nicer ride, and when you do, you won't look back.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    43
    I love working on my stuff as it is. I have already replaced the shock on mine with a new larger one since I am a bigger guy. I tweak anything and everything I possibly can. I have some basic tools that I like that I forgot to bring with me on the trail. And my next bike will most likely be a used hardtail to that I can buy a quality brand. My current is a Mongoose XR-75 I believe. I had to pull all that sticker crap off before anything. I dont expect it to last a long time, but it was cheap if I decided I didn't want to ride. Once I ride the hell outta this bike it will prove to my wife that investing more money into a quality bike is worth it.(I've spent money in the past on stuff that ended up sitting around.)

  4. #4
    _F_
    _F_ is offline
    shama lama ding dong
    Reputation: _F_'s Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    8
    Your story reminds me of my own:

    I started to get into biking last season. Like you I was on a Mongoose. I got the bike used from a friend for $40. I beat the snot out of that bike. I rode that thing over 300 miles on the trails. It finally gave up the ghost last fall. It creaked and groaned and wasn't comfortable but I kept riding anyways because I so enjoyed being on the trails.

    That Mongoose helped me go from 250 to 225 pounds last year. I got a Giant XTC 2 this spring and started the season at 205 pounds. Keep riding and your health will improve.

    I am truly amazed at how much more comfortable and fun riding is this season with the new bike. We can't all go out and plop down big bucks for a nice bike right away. Ride the goose until it is cooked. In the meantime build rapport with your local LBS, try out different bikes, and search for a possible used bike.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    43
    Hehe, I hope to do like you with the weight loss. That alone is an inspiration to me. I plan to ride the goose till she gives out! My only fear is of the prices at the LBS. They barely have any bikes under $1k, and many around $2k+. Their only tow along trailer for a child is $500. Camelbak's average $80+ there. I have a military camelbak that cost me in the $30 range brand new and its a military model made to be chemical resistant, and a camo pattern I dig I am usually very.... thrifty.... to say the least so price range is very important for me. Quality is important but I dont have enough free money at the end of the day to buy a $1000 bike. A forge for $300 is in my range for a hardtail through.

  6. #6
    Riding a Rig.
    Reputation: Vulcan's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    1,157
    Quote Originally Posted by GarfieldOne
    Hehe, I hope to do like you with the weight loss. That alone is an inspiration to me. I plan to ride the goose till she gives out! My only fear is of the prices at the LBS. They barely have any bikes under $1k, and many around $2k+. Their only tow along trailer for a child is $500. Camelbak's average $80+ there. I have a military camelbak that cost me in the $30 range brand new and its a military model made to be chemical resistant, and a camo pattern I dig I am usually very.... thrifty.... to say the least so price range is very important for me. Quality is important but I dont have enough free money at the end of the day to buy a $1000 bike. A forge for $300 is in my range for a hardtail through.
    For the most part, a quality mountain bike is going to cost $800.00+. It can be a lot to swallow at first, but its worth it if your going to be riding a lot.
    "Physics is timeless. Marketing and bs never lasts. Thats been proven time and time again."
    -Dave Weagle

  7. #7
    Hey! Watch This!
    Reputation: Lakerat_sr11's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    75
    Quote Originally Posted by Vulcan
    For the most part, a quality mountain bike is going to cost $800.00+. It can be a lot to swallow at first, but its worth it if your going to be riding a lot.
    Especially if you are a big guy. Components will wear out faster on a low end bike if you are overweight.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    28
    If you really get into mtbing, its worth your time to spend a little extra, it will save you in the long run upgrading parts. Otherwise, cragslist/ebay can be a good way to find a cheap, quality bike. Enjoy the ride and stick with it!

  9. #9
    _F_
    _F_ is offline
    shama lama ding dong
    Reputation: _F_'s Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    8
    MTB, like many hobbies, can become expensive quickly. Take your time and search around. I like to purchase clearance goods to save money. I started planning and budgeting for my bike purchase last season.
    The superior man is modest in his speech, but exceeds in his actions.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •