1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
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2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #1
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    First time going clipless

    i have been riding with friends who have been into MTB for a long time and they all have suggested going clipless.

    i was very hesitant because i just feared that going clipless will be the end of me. i just do not like the idea of my feet tied to my pedals specially when im about to crash.

    despite this fear, ive read and read and read about pros & cons of going clipless and just going platform which is what im using right now.

    from what ive read both platform and clipless have good arguments and i was going for a low profile and light platform pedal i got swayed into trying clipless.

    so now, i have the SPD M540, tried it out last night and fell off balance only once. ive set it to least tension and looks like i was able to well.

    now, my question, i usually ride a trail with single tracks and has sharp uphill curves(best way i can describe it), was i WRONG to understand id be able to go clipless with this kind of terrain?

    was i reading it wrong when i read clipless is the way to go only to find out the post was not really pertaining to trail riding?

    im just planning to take along my platform pedals just in case i need to switch.. .that's if i dont hurt myself.. first..

    thanks.
    Last edited by bapski; 09-27-2012 at 07:47 PM.
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  2. #2
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    Generally you can clean more difficult up hill sections with cleats than without cleats...

    Especiall steep uphill corners....

    Basically riding up a bermed run....

  3. #3
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    My philosophy for going clipless, especially on terrain as you're speaking of, is to keep the bike upright and rolling, and keep my cadence up. Worrying about what will happen if I spill is a waste of time - worry about clearing that uphill and keeping the rubber side down. I belive this has made me a better rider

  4. #4
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    Your first ride after a vasectomy can be painful. I'd keep it on smoother trails and build up ride time and mileage as you recover and ...

    Oh, you meant first time "clipless" !
    "I love the bike. It's my meditation. I think I'm bike-sexual." -Robin Williams

  5. #5
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    I went clipless after 2 months. My advice is that you just have to anticipate further ahead when you need your foot. My example would be when I was riding with a group, the rider in front of me was struggling up a hill. I just had to have the presence of mind that I was going to need to clip out. Once you get the hang of it, it becomes second nature and you do it without even thinking about it. The trick is to keep moving!

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by ZmyDust View Post
    My philosophy for going clipless, especially on terrain as you're speaking of, is to keep the bike upright and rolling, and keep my cadence up. Worrying about what will happen if I spill is a waste of time - worry about clearing that uphill and keeping the rubber side down. I belive this has made me a better rider
    Yup!!

    I have 4 clipless rides under my belt now, and that is my philosophy as well. If I fall, oh well, I fall. Nobody ever said mountainbiking was safe. If I wanted to be safe I'd stick to the road.

    I installed the clpless just before getting back into MTB after years out of it, so I needed a little brush up on my skills. I think the clipless is helping me do that, as I'm making more of an effort to clear technical stuff rather than just dabbing. Since I'm still not confident that I can clip out quickly when I need to, I always think to myself "clear it or fall". And since it's usually some sort of rocky section that will give me trouble, not falling is a good motivatior to ride better!

  7. #7
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    I vehemently oppose people leveraging technology without knowing why they want to use the technology or what how it will add to the enjoyment of an activity. There is widespread use of equipment because other people said one should or that it's better when it isn't always better for everyone in every use case. I believe clip less accounts for many of the injuries in this hobby - far more than necessary.

    When I read a statement like, "I was swayed," a big, fat, red flag goes up. Why do YOU want to go clip less?
    No, YOU don't understand. You're making an ass of yourself for all of eternity.

  8. #8
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    Good job! im alive

    Quote Originally Posted by ZmyDust View Post
    My philosophy for going clipless, especially on terrain as you're speaking of, is to keep the bike upright and rolling, and keep my cadence up. Worrying about what will happen if I spill is a waste of time - worry about clearing that uphill and keeping the rubber side down. I belive this has made me a better rider
    this i did, and i think i did fairly well today. i made it alive!

    Quote Originally Posted by mtbguy123 View Post
    I went clipless after 2 months. My advice is that you just have to anticipate further ahead when you need your foot. My example would be when I was riding with a group, the rider in front of me was struggling up a hill. I just had to have the presence of mind that I was going to need to clip out. Once you get the hang of it, it becomes second nature and you do it without even thinking about it. The trick is to keep moving!
    pretty much agree. as ive said i made through the ride alive! we were almost clearing the trail when one of my buds all of a sudden wanted to take the lead, slipping a curve and well, on a part where roots abounded he kinda struggled and i probably was just too close to him that i lost my balance and fell. all i got was just a small scratch, no biggy and still thankful i did well. moral of the story, make sure there is ample space between a newbie rider and a newbie rider riding clipless for the first time (although im not sure if seasoned clipless users try to maintain a sound distance between riders. . )

    .... turns out the wifey called and was looking for him! another moral of the story, do not ride with anybody that is in a time constraint... it would be safer to just ride the fire roads. .

    Quote Originally Posted by wmac View Post
    I vehemently oppose people leveraging technology without knowing why they want to use the technology or what how it will add to the enjoyment of an activity. There is widespread use of equipment because other people said one should or that it's better when it isn't always better for everyone in every use case. I believe clip less accounts for many of the injuries in this hobby - far more than necessary.

    When I read a statement like, "I was swayed," a big, fat, red flag goes up. Why do YOU want to go clip less?
    i'd like believe i have a brain of my own that i can make my own decisions. i am mature enough and have enough wisdom to know what is right and wrong for me. i tried going clipless to experience the difference between going clipless and using platform pedals and there is. and quite noticeably, and the efficiently of the pedal strokes. i just felt my ride today was a lot easier... although im not sure if this is what i want since im on this for exercise and to lose weight... so harder strokes, more workout for me.

    in summary, for newer MTB riders that'll come across the same question as i have, going clipless is a good experience albeit there is really a factor of safety in regards to be able to break free your feet if you need to. and yes you will be able to get unclipped rather easily. you'd have to practice though to make it "second nature" as they say. i would have done a lot better if i rode for a bit going clipless and not just practice overnight.

    also, it would have helped if i did not forget to read the M540 manual. turns out there is a CLEAT i can use that will allow me to unclip in more ways rather than just SIDEWAYS that the stock cleat that came with my shoes only allows. ..

    thank you for your input guys... i promise ill get better on my next ride.. .
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  9. #9
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    I still have not made the transition yet, but I believe I will in the next few months. I have been MTB for about 3 months now everyday mon-sat. Local trail with lots of rocks and switchbacks on climbs, both of which make me nervous enough with platforms. What I notice from the good riders is their cadence, as long as they are trucking along it seems like no rock or quick bend really affects their balance, which is exactly what happens to me when I hit rocks or a switchback to slow.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by wolv275 View Post
    I still have not made the transition yet, but I believe I will in the next few months. I have been MTB for about 3 months now everyday mon-sat. Local trail with lots of rocks and switchbacks on climbs, both of which make me nervous enough with platforms. What I notice from the good riders is their cadence, as long as they are trucking along it seems like no rock or quick bend really affects their balance, which is exactly what happens to me when I hit rocks or a switchback to slow.
    looks like you are more conditioned than i am.. therefore you should be able to do it..

    but, nobody else, experts as they may, would be able to tell if you are able or not. only you can... take your time... and have fun while you are..
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  11. #11
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    No, YOU don't understand. You're making an ass of yourself for all of eternity.

  12. #12
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    Oh, and if you're Hell bent on clipless, practice track stands in the grass. Let yourself go past the point of no return to force you to get the muscle memory of unclipping subconsciously.
    No, YOU don't understand. You're making an ass of yourself for all of eternity.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by wmac View Post
    Oh, and if you're Hell bent on clipless, practice track stands in the grass. Let yourself go past the point of no return to force you to get the muscle memory of unclipping subconsciously.
    i concur with trackstands in tall grass. i practiced in a soccer field, nice and lush. trackstands and wheelies, falling out of both. didnt hurt at all, made me aware of how the shoes worked with the pedals, and gave me a glimpse of what to expect when i do crash.
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  14. #14
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    clipless is how I roll.
    I cant ride a bike with flats anymore, makes me feel clumsy and off balance. prolly just my head messin with me

    been clipless for years. Once, and only once did I fail to unclip. I ended up on my back with bike on top still clipped in. hurt my pride more than anything.
    Depending on pedal/cleat system, get a cleat with multi-directional clip, loosen up the tension. as you get more comfortable, tighten the tension up a bit. dont crank it down or you'll never get the cleat out.

    and like others said, practice on grass.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by wolv275 View Post
    ... What I notice from the good riders is their cadence, as long as they are trucking along it seems like no rock or quick bend really affects their balance, which is exactly what happens to me when I hit rocks or a switchback to slow.
    Momentum is the key to balance. It has to do with physics and angular momentum, but the action of rolling wheels on the bike helps to keep you balanced. At the extreme there are guys riding motorcycles over 180 mph doing landspeed runs and the bikes will stay balanced pretty much on their own due to the angular momentum of wheels.

    Clearly bikes that we ride don't go that fast, but physics is the same. There is one section of local trail is a river bend (slight uphill) and is 100% loose rocks the size of volleyballs. The only wat through it is to "motocross it". That means just pedal like hell to keep the bike moving. If you keep pedaling and the keep the wheels rolling the my 26" hardtail tackles it just fine. If you good too slow you are done.


    The good part about clipless pedals is it allows more power to the pedal when combined with stiff soled shoes and despite how rocky the terrain your feel will not come off. Once you get comfortalb with the pedals you will find that you can unclip very quickly when needed. What you can't do however is unclip while you are pushing down on the pedal.

    What I mean is that if the bike is falling to the left and you have you left foot down (fully extented) and try to release it won't work. Your foot will be stuck due to you weight pushing you back into the pedal. You need to learn to release before you feel the reaction to putting that foot down on the ground so that you are not pushing down on the pedal during release. Best to release with pedal either at the mid point or at the top of stroke rather than the bottom as you tend to put less downward pressure on pedal in those positions.
    Joe
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  16. #16
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    i will never suggest that clipless is the way to go for everyone, but i would suggest that everyone tries both platform and clipless and decide THEN for themselves...

    the biggest fear for many riders considering trying clipless is - unclipping... there are other concerns, but this one is the biggest in my experience...

    and yes - there will be some spills at the beginning, and some of them will hurt, inevitably...

    but once we accustom ourselves with clipless pedals - unclipping becomes a second nature... you don't even have to think about it any more - your brain will issue commands almost independently once it is in the mayday mode...

    in the last few years - i have not had a spill that i did not unclip can separated myself from the bike - to the point that i had a couple of endos where i ended up on my feet in front of the bike...

    again, it becomes a second nature and it happens in split second, once you spend some time with clipless... how long is this time - it is individual...

    once this happens - you will stop thinking about your pedals and will think only how to get over that obstacle, switchback, or top of the hill... and in most cases - clipless will help you do it.

    once you are totally relaxed with clipless - then you decide if they are your game or not...

    good luck and enjoy your ride...



    Quote Originally Posted by StuntmanMike View Post
    Yup!!

    I have 4 clipless rides under my belt now, and that is my philosophy as well. If I fall, oh well, I fall. Nobody ever said mountainbiking was safe. If I wanted to be safe I'd stick to the road.

    I installed the clpless just before getting back into MTB after years out of it, so I needed a little brush up on my skills. I think the clipless is helping me do that, as I'm making more of an effort to clear technical stuff rather than just dabbing. Since I'm still not confident that I can clip out quickly when I need to, I always think to myself "clear it or fall". And since it's usually some sort of rocky section that will give me trouble, not falling is a good motivatior to ride better!

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by bapski View Post


    i'd like believe i have a brain of my own that i can make my own decisions. i am mature enough and have enough wisdom to know what is right and wrong for me. i tried going clipless to experience the difference between going clipless and using platform pedals and there is. and quite noticeably, and the efficiently of the pedal strokes. i just felt my ride today was a lot easier... although im not sure if this is what i want since im on this for exercise and to lose weight... so harder strokes, more workout for me.

    in summary, for newer MTB riders that'll come across the same question as i have, going clipless is a good experience albeit there is really a factor of safety in regards to be able to break free your feet if you need to. and yes you will be able to get unclipped rather easily. you'd have to practice though to make it "second nature" as they say. i would have done a lot better if i rode for a bit going clipless and not just practice overnight.
    nicely said - way to go...

    also, it would have helped if i did not forget to read the M540 manual. turns out there is a CLEAT i can use that will allow me to unclip in more ways rather than just SIDEWAYS that the stock cleat that came with my shoes only allows. ..

    thank you for your input guys... i promise ill get better on my next ride.. .
    live and learn...

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by JoePAz View Post
    Momentum is the key to balance. It has to do with physics and angular momentum, but the action of rolling wheels on the bike helps to keep you balanced. At the extreme there are guys riding motorcycles over 180 mph doing landspeed runs and the bikes will stay balanced pretty much on their own due to the angular momentum of wheels.

    Clearly bikes that we ride don't go that fast, but physics is the same. There is one section of local trail is a river bend (slight uphill) and is 100% loose rocks the size of volleyballs. The only wat through it is to "motocross it". That means just pedal like hell to keep the bike moving. If you keep pedaling and the keep the wheels rolling the my 26" hardtail tackles it just fine. If you good too slow you are done.


    The good part about clipless pedals is it allows more power to the pedal when combined with stiff soled shoes and despite how rocky the terrain your feel will not come off. Once you get comfortalb with the pedals you will find that you can unclip very quickly when needed. What you can't do however is unclip while you are pushing down on the pedal.

    What I mean is that if the bike is falling to the left and you have you left foot down (fully extented) and try to release it won't work. Your foot will be stuck due to you weight pushing you back into the pedal. You need to learn to release before you feel the reaction to putting that foot down on the ground so that you are not pushing down on the pedal during release. Best to release with pedal either at the mid point or at the top of stroke rather than the bottom as you tend to put less downward pressure on pedal in those positions.
    i would add - smooth lines on top of momentum and you are golden... in rock garden - you need to look as far ahead as you can and pick good lines, then use momentum.... ratcheting will help you keep going without too much bashing on your equipment...

    i feel much more confident in the rock when i am clipped in... not worried about slipping and losing connection with my bike - for any reason... plus being clipped in makes it easier to toss the bike around and apply body english more efficiently...

    having said all this - i still think pedals are a personal preference and what works for me may not work for someone else... we all should pick the tool that we are the most comfortable with, not what others say is the holly grail....

  19. #19
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    Osokolo - totally agree. I ride clipless and I ride flats. There's nothing I can do on my SPDs that I can't do on my flats. The ONLY advantage I find is that I can unload my upstroke pedal a little easier on climbs without slipping off and my clipless pedal/shoe combo is a little lighter weight. I'm not convinced pulling on the upstroke is better. It seems like it in my head, but the research concludes otherwise.

    "In one study (Mornieux et al. Int J Sports Med 2008; 29:817-822) it was found that the pedal stroke of elite cyclists looked the same on flats and clipless pedals. Another study (Korff et al. Med Sci Sports Exerc 2007; 39:991-995) showed that pedaling in circles or pulling through the top of the pedal stroke resulted in a less powerful and efficient pedal stroke – *in other words, there is no “magical” pedal stroke that is only available by attaching your foot to the pedals.
    If you can’t pedal half as well without being attached to your pedals then that is a sure sign that you would benefit greatly from some time spent riding “raw”, so to speak, and building your technique and fitness base without the aid of being attached to your bike. Once you can ride almost as well on flats as you did on clipess, go back and try clipless pedals again and I’ll bet you see a big difference in how effectively you can use them."
    Source: Clipless Pedals: Enhancing Performance or Covering Up Dysfunction? | Exercises For Injuries

    Although the Ham Butt Problem and the Five Monkeys and a Ladder stories are Urban Ledgends, I believe we could learn something from the points the stories are trying to make.
    No, YOU don't understand. You're making an ass of yourself for all of eternity.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by wmac View Post
    really good read, but i do find it odd that i do find a difference between using platform and clipless. seems like all my pedal strokes matter now. guess its just my mind playing tricks on me.

    Quote Originally Posted by wmac View Post
    Oh, and if you're Hell bent on clipless, practice track stands in the grass. Let yourself go past the point of no return to force you to get the muscle memory of unclipping subconsciously.
    cant wait to try this out as this is a good idea..

    Quote Originally Posted by JoePAz View Post
    Momentum is the key to balance. It has to do with physics and angular momentum, but the action of rolling wheels on the bike helps to keep you balanced. .
    could'nt be more agreeable. what i have noticed is that on steep climbs and if i am exhausted, i usually would just fall short of finishing the climb. when i was clipped, probably because strokes were more efficient that i was able to finish the climb easier(?)

    Quote Originally Posted by wmac View Post
    Osokolo - totally agree. I ride clipless and I ride flats. There's nothing I can do on my SPDs that I can't do on my flats. The ONLY advantage I find is that I can unload my upstroke pedal a little easier on climbs without slipping off and my clipless pedal/shoe combo is a little lighter weight. I'm not convinced pulling on the upstroke is better. It seems like it in my head, but the research concludes otherwise.

    "In one study (Mornieux et al. Int J Sports Med 2008; 29:817-822) it was found that the pedal stroke of elite cyclists looked the same on flats and clipless pedals. Another study (Korff et al. Med Sci Sports Exerc 2007; 39:991-995) showed that pedaling in circles or pulling through the top of the pedal stroke resulted in a less powerful and efficient pedal stroke – *in other words, there is no “magical” pedal stroke that is only available by attaching your foot to the pedals.
    If you can’t pedal half as well without being attached to your pedals then that is a sure sign that you would benefit greatly from some time spent riding “raw”, so to speak, and building your technique and fitness base without the aid of being attached to your bike. Once you can ride almost as well on flats as you did on clipess, go back and try clipless pedals again and I’ll bet you see a big difference in how effectively you can use them."
    Source: Clipless Pedals: Enhancing Performance or Covering Up Dysfunction? | Exercises For Injuries

    Although the Ham Butt Problem and the Five Monkeys and a Ladder stories are Urban Ledgends, I believe we could learn something from the points the stories are trying to make.
    ...is what i want to say..

    ill definitely try the SH56 multi-directional cleat and see if its any better. im going for my second ride clipped tomorrow and hopefully ill be better! plus i need to be more safer as itll be a couple of us newbie monkey and another one that is clueless of what he is going into.
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  21. #21
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    hmmmm...
    always wondered about them clip on cleets...

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by wolv275 View Post
    I still have not made the transition yet, but I believe I will in the next few months. I have been MTB for about 3 months now everyday mon-sat. Local trail with lots of rocks and switchbacks on climbs, both of which make me nervous enough with platforms. What I notice from the good riders is their cadence, as long as they are trucking along it seems like no rock or quick bend really affects their balance, which is exactly what happens to me when I hit rocks or a switchback to slow.
    dude should you decide to try it out and decide on SPD, id highly recommend you using the SH56 cleat!

    it really was a big difference from the SH51 cleat that came with my M540 pedals..

    the SH56 cleats were very much easier to get out of... in fact lost momentum while going through a bed of rocks (id call them boulders) and was already preparing to fall when i just kinda re-positioned my left foot and got disengaged enough for me to plant my foot on the ground...

    ill be sticking on these cleats until i get used to going clipless... rest of the ride was exceptional and a lot of fun as usual..
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  23. #23
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    I am conflicted by the clipless debate. Having gone clipless early on and gone back to platforms and realizing how lazy clipless pedals made me I wish I would have stayed with platforms until they were mastered. If you can't perform a perfect bunny hop over a decent object then you should stay on platform. If you can't move a bike around on platforms don't go clipless. But this is just how I don't want to have pedals coving for my deficiencies.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joedub917 View Post
    I am conflicted by the clipless debate. Having gone clipless early on and gone back to platforms and realizing how lazy clipless pedals made me I wish I would have stayed with platforms until they were mastered. If you can't perform a perfect bunny hop over a decent object then you should stay on platform. If you can't move a bike around on platforms don't go clipless. But this is just how I don't want to have pedals coving for my deficiencies.
    im gonna call shenanigans on this. i rode platforms long enough to get my feet comfortable under me, and still couldnt bunny hop a bottle cap. switched to clipless and said bottlecap is still in danger of being run over- but i feel better on the bike, and actually ride better too.

    at my age, ill take all the help i can get. if my spds are covering for a deficiency, so be it.
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  25. #25
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    It was merely my opinion. Take it for what you want. I just think clipless give you a false sense of your abilities. If that is fine with you then all the power to you it just wasn't ok to me.

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