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  1. #1
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    First group ride experience

    Went on my first group ride last night. This was mostly a "nobody gets left behind" beginner ride, but the people were still pretty fast!

    There were 3 groups, a few real fast guys that took off on their own, a "middle" group that I ended up riding with, and a third group that hung back and kinda took their time. I got left in the dust mostly and caught up to the group at each stop...as fully expected. But still had a good time.

    Some overall thoughts...

    1. I was a little nervous for whatever reason! As we took off and got going I was slow and just felt off. After a while I settled in a little bit, but for whatever reason I did not ride particularly well. Took a couple of bad lines on roots, almost whacked a tree, didn't make it up a hill that I've made it up before several times, etc. I don't know if it was just the pressure of trying to keep up or what, but I didn't seem to ride as well as when I've been by myself. Probably just chalk it up to nerves from it being my first time riding with a group.

    2. I am SLOW in the twisty stuff. During the open sections with minor uphills and that I was able to mostly keep up / catch up so fitness wise I feel like I'm in the ballpark with many of the other riders. But as soon as we hit the twisty stuff I got smoked. I know this will probably come with experience, but I need to work on cornering faster and turning in general. Trust your tires was a phrase thrown at me by one of the other guys. Not sure I fully understand what that means or how to do it! Lol. How to I learn to "trust my tires"?? Just developing confidence that the tires will maintain traction even if I'm going a bit faster?

    Gna hit YouTube for some cornering tips and try to work on this. Maybe a tire upgrade will help. I noticed that basically ALL of the other riders had wider tires than me. I did get some advice from one of the other riders to decrease pressure a bit more...he recommended 35 in the rear and 30 in the front as a starting point for my weight. So maybe I'll give that a shot in the meantime, and I can definitely see a set of tires in my future.

    3. I need some sporty Rx glasses either clear or maybe low yellow-ish tint. My sunglasses that I wear whenever I'm doing active stuff work great in the daylight. Last nights ride went into dusk. Had to swap to my regular glasses. Enter all the wind, dust, and fog you could imagine. It was awful and certainly didn't help my riding. If I'm going to ever ride at this time of day again...I need some good frames.

    If you guys wanna chime in on any of the above or any other group ride tidbits...go!

  2. #2
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    First group ride experience

    For RX frames, I use the oakley flak 2.0 XL. Very comfy, great protection, and easy to swap lenses. They are also a versatile design that works for all outdoor activities. I run them with the clear-black iridium photochromic lens. This lens gets almost fully clear (haven't tried them at night but work great at dusk) and pretty dark (though not as dark as oakley's black lens) these work for me in pretty much all lighting except when there is lots of glare off the ground.

  3. #3
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    I've never done a group ride, but I want to at some point. I don't have any pointers about "trusting your tires"- you can only lean in so hard before you crack your head on a tree (at least around here). My question would be what kind of entering speeds you have. Someone somewhere said "slow is smooth, and smooth is fast." Maybe something to look at there. I do enjoy the YouTube videos of riding tips.

    For your RX glasses, I'd recommend a newer style oakley (like the flak 2.0) with removable lenses. That way you spend less in the long run. You can get a plain pair of $70 frames, and then order whatever RX lenses you want for day or night. I'm sure a bunch of people are going to flame me and call me an oakley fanboy for not choosing a cheaper brand, etc, etc., but who cares. What is easily accessible and has good customer service is the brand to go with.


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  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by thepusher View Post
    I've never done a group ride, but I want to at some point. I don't have any pointers about "trusting your tires"- you can only lean in so hard before you crack your head on a tree (at least around here).
    This is your first problem, lean your bike not your body. Drop your outside foot to lower your center of gravity and maintain "downward" pressure on the bike to help maintain traction. I see a lot of guys that ride motorcycles leaning with the mountain bike and it's wrong.
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  5. #5
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    I rode with Oakleys (non-Rx). They are great lenses. I HATED the nose piece on mine though. Maybe the newer ones are improved. Mine had the little rubber pieces that touches your nose and they just kinda hooked onto a nub on the frame. After a handful of rides I guess sweat causes the rubber piece to fall off easily. So I found myself losing the little rubber piece on one side more than a few times. I hated them. But like I said...best lenses I've ever used. Mine were polarized too which is a big step above the non-polarized as far as quality. They actually improved my vision slightly...made things sharper. Almost as if they were an Rx lens. But I've lost two pairs so no more Oakley for me. Too expensive even with the discount I get to risk losing them in the woods or on the road.

    I'd really like to try some Tifosi...they seem really well made and don't break the bank as badly as Oakelys will. I did just pick up some pretty nice glasses from Walmart. In the fishing section they have a selection of polarized glasses. I paid like $12 for them and the lenses are surprisingly good. Not Oakley good. But head and tails better than the cheap safety glasses I've been wearing most of the summer. At $12 a pair...it will hurt less when/if I lose them.

    None of these suggestions will do you any good though if you require Rx lenses although Tifosi does offer Rx ready but they seem insanely expensive. Whatever you get...I'd highly recommend getting polarized if possible. Makes a pretty serious improvement.
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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Streetdoctor View Post
    This is your first problem, lean your bike not your body. Drop your outside foot to lower your center of gravity and maintain "downward" pressure on the bike to help maintain traction. I see a lot of guys that ride motorcycles leaning with the mountain bike and it's wrong.
    Yup, I was thinking the same thing. Don't ride it like a Harley.

    OP - meatier tires at a lower pressure will be a lot easier to trust than what you're currently running. Make a world of difference.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nubster View Post
    I rode with Oakleys (non-Rx). They are great lenses. I HATED the nose piece on mine though. Maybe the newer ones are improved. Mine had the little rubber pieces that touches your nose and they just kinda hooked onto a nub on the frame. After a handful of rides I guess sweat causes the rubber piece to fall off easily. So I found myself losing the little rubber piece on one side more than a few times. I hated them. But like I said...best lenses I've ever used. Mine were polarized too which is a big step above the non-polarized as far as quality. They actually improved my vision slightly...made things sharper. Almost as if they were an Rx lens. But I've lost two pairs so no more Oakley for me. Too expensive even with the discount I get to risk losing them in the woods or on the road.

    I'd really like to try some Tifosi...they seem really well made and don't break the bank as badly as Oakelys will. I did just pick up some pretty nice glasses from Walmart. In the fishing section they have a selection of polarized glasses. I paid like $12 for them and the lenses are surprisingly good. Not Oakley good. But head and tails better than the cheap safety glasses I've been wearing most of the summer. At $12 a pair...it will hurt less when/if I lose them.

    None of these suggestions will do you any good though if you require Rx lenses although Tifosi does offer Rx ready. Whatever you get...I'd highly recommend getting polarized if possible. Makes a pretty serious improvement.
    Oakley makes a ton of different models, which ones did you have? Makes a difference. Also not all models use rubber in the same quantities or places. The rubber nose piece on the flak 2.0 are on there really well.

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    They were both either half-jackets or flak jackets. I can't remember. But they were older...5+ years old. Probably 6 or 7 years old by now. That's why I wonder if they improved them because they were terrible. Everything else about them were great. Just those horrible nose pieces.
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    Just looked at the Standard Issue site and I'm pretty sure they were half jackets. I see there's a half jacket 2.0 now so maybe the issue has been fixed but they look like the same piece of crap nose pieces that were on there before. Maybe the way they attach is better now but no way I'll chance it on a $100+ pair of sunglasses. The flak jacket looks to have the same nose piece too.
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    I never had any of those models. The Flak 2.0 (not flak jacket) has them very secure. As does the fivesquared i got issued from work. They seem to be releasing a lot of new models similar to the old half and flak jackets so the nose piece may be one of the things they changed. The Flak 2.0 has a one-piece nosepiece that snaps in and can be swapped (comes with two sizes so the user can find the best fit)

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by bronxbomber252 View Post
    Oakley makes a ton of different models, which ones did you have? Makes a difference. Also not all models use rubber in the same quantities or places. The rubber nose piece on the flak 2.0 are on there really well.
    That's what I was thinking about the flak 2.0. Ive been using mine since '13 and haven't had an issue. I noticed someone mentioned the SI site, and Ive been buying from there also.

    That's interesting about the leaning. I do a mix of both, and think there's a time and place for each; that being said, I'm definitely no pro. Hell, I ride my platforms on reebok crossfit shoes most of the time.


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    Re: Oakley's...I don't have a problem paying a premium for a premium product if there's noticeable difference in performance.

    My polarized Rx sunglasses are Rayban and I love them. Wear them every day and for all outdoor activities incl riding thus far. So comfortable, stay on, don't fog, block wind. They're a gem for my face lol.

    Changeable lenses would be awesome however! Are they easy to swap in and out? Would be nice to just bring the clear lenses and swap to them as it gets dark as opposed to bringing a whole other pair of glasses or whatever.

    Another thing about Oakley is last time I went to buy them (years ago) the high wrap frame I wanted they couldn't fit the lenses because of my Rx. High wrap Raybans weren't an issue...so I went with those. I'll have to look into whether or not these lens swapping Oakley frames are doable for me.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Streetdoctor View Post
    This is your first problem, lean your bike not your body. Drop your outside foot to lower your center of gravity and maintain "downward" pressure on the bike to help maintain traction. I see a lot of guys that ride motorcycles leaning with the mountain bike and it's wrong.
    I haven't had a chance to YouTube this yet and I'm sure that will help me with what to focus on as far as technique. But also, what's the best way to actually practice this? Focusing on technique and just trying the turns at slower speeds and staying off the brakes?

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    Quote Originally Posted by guitarguy View Post
    But also, what's the best way to actually practice this? Focusing on technique and just trying the turns at slower speeds and staying off the brakes?
    Yup. You can practice anywhere, driveway, parking lot, etc.
    Google bike/body separation.
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    Quote Originally Posted by guitarguy View Post
    I haven't had a chance to YouTube this yet and I'm sure that will help me with what to focus on as far as technique. But also, what's the best way to actually practice this? Focusing on technique and just trying the turns at slower speeds and staying off the brakes?
    Here's the snippet that I learned from: https://youtu.be/IoNOvtwxpxo?list=PL...v6oeP-b9&t=182

    Just go in your yard or street and do figure-8s or snake back and forth a ton. Just have to build the habit of leaning bike vs. body and outer foot down.

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    Quote Originally Posted by bronxbomber252 View Post
    I never had any of those models. The Flak 2.0 (not flak jacket) has them very secure. As does the fivesquared i got issued from work. They seem to be releasing a lot of new models similar to the old half and flak jackets so the nose piece may be one of the things they changed. The Flak 2.0 has a one-piece nosepiece that snaps in and can be swapped (comes with two sizes so the user can find the best fit)
    If it's a one piece nose it's probably improved a lot over the older ones I had. The ones I had were two little rubber bits that just kinda attached to a little hook like piece on the frame. Every time I'd wipe the lenses to clean them the nose piece would pop off. And they came off numerous times while just wearing them too. Glad to hear that they improved them. When I bought mine years ago...they were a lot cheaper. Like $60 I think with the discount. Not sure I can bring myself to spend over $100 these days for sunglasses. Maybe a pair for driving or everyday wear.
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  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Streetdoctor View Post
    This is your first problem, lean your bike not your body. Drop your outside foot to lower your center of gravity and maintain "downward" pressure on the bike to help maintain traction. I see a lot of guys that ride motorcycles leaning with the mountain bike and it's wrong.
    Only just recently realized the above tip myself. Makes sense though. If you're a bit more upright while the bike is leaning, you keep weight bearing more downward and hopefully improve traction as a result.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BikeMrown View Post
    Here's the snippet that I learned from: https://youtu.be/IoNOvtwxpxo?list=PL...v6oeP-b9&t=182

    Just go in your yard or street and do figure-8s or snake back and forth a ton. Just have to build the habit of leaning bike vs. body and outer foot down.
    Good video! I will practice this.

    One thing I noticed is they don't discuss pedaling, and they guy is never sitting. When cornering sometimes I'm sitting and just pedaling through. But I think part of it is that I slow down into the turn a lot and then coming out I'm going slow so I wanna pick back up speed.

    Bad idea? Should I be standing and coasting through most turns?

  19. #19
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    Sounds like you had fun! I do group rides here and there and learned a couple of things. To start, taking your time and learning the trade is always a good thing. I am the stubborn type and I refuse to ride beyond my skill even when I ride with a group. My friends and family ride pretty hard due to experience and I took my time to ride with them. Fast forward a year and a half, I can keep up with them much better.

    I also learned that getting dropped can be a good thing. I would recommend you build your experience and endurance levels before you get to this point. I believe getting dropped may be more raced focused than riding with your friends but either way, it can be a motivator. Just don't be reckless!

    It's ok to be nervous too. People tend to get a little nervous around new people with various skill levels. Also, cornering is an art form. Like others mention, watch some of the YouTube videos (like GMBN) to learn how to maximize your ride experience.
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    I've done a few group rides, and I do get a bit edgy as well. Probably not the best advice, but most of the time I ride alone or with a friend. I feel better on my own, at my own pace, where I don't have the extra "pressure". Riding the same trails often, until you know it like the back of your hand, was a huge help.

    I also go the cheap way for sun glasses, I lose them, break them, sit on them. My problem is that soon I will need a RX for riding. getting old sucks!
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    Quote Originally Posted by Streetdoctor View Post
    This is your first problem, lean your bike not your body. Drop your outside foot to lower your center of gravity and maintain "downward" pressure on the bike to help maintain traction. I see a lot of guys that ride motorcycles leaning with the mountain bike and it's wrong.
    Honestly, I think jumping straight to that is too much for beginners.

    First thing I teach is keeping "level" pedals. For raw beginners, it introduces the idea of paying attention to pedal position, but without introducing too many extra concepts.
    Next comes leaning the bike. That takes a rider pretty far, to be honest.

    Pressure control techniques come later as speed increases. That includes dropping the outside pedal, but also handlebar pressure. They come later because they require a finer touch, and a better "feel" for the bike, and you're riding closer to the limits of your bike's and your own ability to stay upright.

    For that matter, there's a whole continuum for "outside pedal drop" that even advanced riders will use, ranging from crank arms at 3 and 9 o'clock to crank arms at 12 and 6 o'clock.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    Honestly, I think jumping straight to that is too much for beginners.

    First thing I teach is keeping "level" pedals. For raw beginners, it introduces the idea of paying attention to pedal position, but without introducing too many extra concepts.
    Next comes leaning the bike. That takes a rider pretty far, to be honest.

    Pressure control techniques come later as speed increases. That includes dropping the outside pedal, but also handlebar pressure. They come later because they require a finer touch, and a better "feel" for the bike, and you're riding closer to the limits of your bike's and your own ability to stay upright.

    For that matter, there's a whole continuum for "outside pedal drop" that even advanced riders will use, ranging from crank arms at 3 and 9 o'clock to crank arms at 12 and 6 o'clock.
    Interesting. I naturally have been keeping my outside foot down pretty consistently, however I'm sure my form for leaning the bike is not correct. I need to work on that part.

    If I'm already in the habit of having my outside foot down, do you advise going back on that habit and working on leaning with level pedals?

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    Quote Originally Posted by guitarguy View Post
    If I'm already in the habit of having my outside foot down, do you advise going back on that habit and working on leaning with level pedals?
    Depends. It's not just about keeping the pedal down, but about weighting it. You should be out of the saddle while doing this, body weight straight down into the pedal and handlebars to maintain traction while the bike is leaned into the turn.

    If the only part of that equation you're doing is putting the outside pedal down, then your focus shouldn't be on that part of it. You should focus on standing up and leaning the bike. If your outside foot drops a bit naturally, I wouldn't sweat it. For me, I've found that the more aggressively I lean the bike, the more my outside foot wants to drop naturally. But don't focus on that part yet. When you start carving those turns fast enough that your tires break loose and you start sliding, and you're doing all the other stuff right (meaning you let the speed FOLLOW the skill development), then you can start exploring pressure control.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    Depends. It's not just about keeping the pedal down, but about weighting it. You should be out of the saddle while doing this, body weight straight down into the pedal and handlebars to maintain traction while the bike is leaned into the turn.

    If the only part of that equation you're doing is putting the outside pedal down, then your focus shouldn't be on that part of it. You should focus on standing up and leaning the bike. If your outside foot drops a bit naturally, I wouldn't sweat it. For me, I've found that the more aggressively I lean the bike, the more my outside foot wants to drop naturally. But don't focus on that part yet. When you start carving those turns fast enough that your tires break loose and you start sliding, and you're doing all the other stuff right (meaning you let the speed FOLLOW the skill development), then you can start exploring pressure control.
    Thank you! This actually clicked a lot. I've been thinking more about having my food down than where my weight is shifted. Gonna work on this!

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    and after you're comfortable with that outside foot down (and going fast enough to notice) focus on dropping the heel on that outside foot and you'll find you can go a little faster You should be pointing your belly button in the direction you want to go as well. Embrace the two wheel slide!
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    Quote Originally Posted by guitarguy View Post
    Re: Oakley's...I don't have a problem paying a premium for a premium product if there's noticeable difference in performance.

    My polarized Rx sunglasses are Rayban and I love them. Wear them every day and for all outdoor activities incl riding thus far. So comfortable, stay on, don't fog, block wind. They're a gem for my face lol.

    Changeable lenses would be awesome however! Are they easy to swap in and out? Would be nice to just bring the clear lenses and swap to them as it gets dark as opposed to bringing a whole other pair of glasses or whatever.

    Another thing about Oakley is last time I went to buy them (years ago) the high wrap frame I wanted they couldn't fit the lenses because of my Rx. High wrap Raybans weren't an issue...so I went with those. I'll have to look into whether or not these lens swapping Oakley frames are doable for me.
    Yeah RX tech has changed a lot. As for switching lenses on the Flak 2.0, it is really quick and easy, I have had multiple interchangeable lens glasses over the years and these are by far the fastest and easiest. The case that comes with them has slots for 2 sets if spare lenses as well.

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    Hey don't worry about keeping up or being off. Ride your pace and have fun. It's not a competition so enjoy yourself. It's always good to ask advise as most people will be glad to help. Of course you'll run into those self righteous, pompous d-bags but know that they are few and far between.

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    Quote Originally Posted by dirkdriller View Post
    Hey don't worry about keeping up or being off. Ride your pace and have fun. It's not a competition so enjoy yourself. It's always good to ask advise as most people will be glad to help. Of course you'll run into those self righteous, pompous d-bags but know that they are few and far between.
    For sure!

    D-bags are everywhere, but so far on here and the people I've met riding have all been cool. And I'm not afraid to admit I'm a beginner and am looking to learn either, so that helps!

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    Quote Originally Posted by bronxbomber252 View Post
    Yeah RX tech has changed a lot. As for switching lenses on the Flak 2.0, it is really quick and easy, I have had multiple interchangeable lens glasses over the years and these are by far the fastest and easiest. The case that comes with them has slots for 2 sets if spare lenses as well.
    I like that it takes less than a minute and doesn't require tools. Plus, they keep updating the new lens coatings for the frame. I now have the polar and the fire iridium that I switch back and forth. To the OP, those two lenses I just mentioned are non-RX (i got laser eye surgery last year), but i still have the smoked and clear RX lenses somewhere.


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    Quote Originally Posted by guitarguy View Post
    3. I need some sporty Rx glasses either clear or maybe low yellow-ish tint
    if you happen to have money coming out your butt to spend on glasses, get whatever you want. if you don't feel like spending a whole lot, look into Zenni glasses. I had my Rx put in this frame 741821 with a light tint put on them for daytime riding for less than $40 all together. they have been just fine for riding for the past few months and if I break or lose them, it won't be as upsetting as having to replace some Oakley's or whatever that cost several hundred bucks.
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    The one thing that helped my riding in the twisty stuff more than anything was to concentrate farther down the trail. If you ride looking mostly at the trail right in front of your bike, you'll end up on some very awkward lines and it will slow you down a lot.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mack_turtle View Post
    if you happen to have money coming out your butt to spend on glasses, get whatever you want. if you don't feel like spending a whole lot, look into Zenni glasses. I had my Rx put in this frame 741821 with a light tint put on them for daytime riding for less than $40 all together. they have been just fine for riding for the past few months and if I break or lose them, it won't be as upsetting as having to replace some Oakley's or whatever that cost several hundred bucks.
    I have some Oakley Jawbones that I like a ton because they fit me really well. Better than a lot of other glasses. I have some very nice Spy glasses that I absolutely cannot ride with because they won't stay put. Anyway, I put Walleva photochromic lenses in my Oakleys and I've gotta say that photochromic lenses are awesome for mtb glasses. And these are only mediocre photochromic lenses.

    I'll be honest, though. While I love the fit of the Oakley frames, I don't love Oakley as a company. Their customer service is entirely nonexistent for the consumer. And, from what I've been told, it's not all that good for dealers, either. It's why I put the cheap lenses in mine. I'm hard on glasses. The lenses on my riding glasses get beat to hell and they eventually get too scratched to be able to see out of. The cheap ones aren't painful to replace when they get to that point.

    Also, for that reason, there's no way I'd ever spring for prescription lenses for them. My riding glasses are protection for my eyes, first. I ride in contact lenses always.

    Maybe if I had vision insurance that paid for the prescription lenses, I'd get some for those occasions where I don't want to mess with contacts (like camping trips), but I don't have that.

    And when it comes down to it, I'd really rather get vision correction surgery.

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    Indeed, i don't have vision insurance, so paying for rx lenses for my old Tifosi sunglasses would have been quite expensive. Rx Oakleys or something similar would cost me a few hundred bucks. No reason to get ripped on that.
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    Sunglasses aren't the first thing that comes to my mind when thinking of ways to improve a group riding experience for a beginner.
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    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    Sunglasses aren't the first thing that comes to my mind when thinking of ways to improve a group riding experience for a beginner.
    I'd send a beginner straight to the local hardware store for some safety glasses for $10 or less. Eye protection is important, but spending more than that is more or less a luxury.

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    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    Sunglasses aren't the first thing that comes to my mind when thinking of ways to improve a group riding experience for a beginner.
    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    I'd send a beginner straight to the local hardware store for some safety glasses for $10 or less. Eye protection is important, but spending more than that is more or less a luxury.
    Obviously you guys don't wear Rx glasses while doing anything active. Athletic framed high wrap Rx sunglasses that are comfortable and stay on my face for me are a necessity for me and have been for years. Running, hiking, walking my dog, doing yard work, whatever. Anything active outside and I'm wearing them. Only recently I added riding to the list.

    The glasses thing and the group ride thing really have nothing to do with each other. That part is simply a coincidence. I could've been riding alone and realized the same thing: that taking my high wrap sunglasses off because it was dusk, and riding in my regular Rx glasses, was just plain motherloving awful. Wind and dust flying into my eyes = no fun. In fact, it barely has to do with biking. I could've been running on a windy day and been just as miserable. But then again, I don't really run at night so I'm always wearing my sunglasses.

    If my eyes could handle contacts, I'd be wearing some cheap safety glasses for sure. But the kind that I can fit over my regular glasses when working using power tools or whatever, aren't comfortable at all and I ain't wearing them while doing anything active. Plus they'd probably fly off.

    On top of that my eyes have always been super sensitive to wind, light, and dryness.

    So for me, high wrap Rx glasses, shaded or not, are more a necessity than a luxury. YMMV.

  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by guitarguy View Post
    Obviously you guys don't wear Rx glasses while doing anything active.
    Only since I was 11 years old

    I've owned some really good Rx shades and they are quite nice but for me more of a luxury item, I inevitably lose or break them so I do most of my riding with $40 scratched up Zenni clear lenses.
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    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    Only since I was 11 years old

    I've owned some really good Rx shades and they are quite nice but for me more of a luxury item, I inevitably lose or break them so I do most of my riding with $40 scratched up Zenni clear lenses.
    Right on. I don't really lose or break mine. Plus I get great value and longevity out of them and use them pretty much every single day.

    The Rx Ray-Bans that I have (4 years or so going strong) are amazingly comfortable. I even got an extra free frame due to them messing up my order when I purchased them...so I'm sitting on a backup frame for when these break or wear out. I don't remember how much they were maybe $125 or something for the frames. I use replacealens.com to have new Rx polarized lenses cut for these...$100 or so every year or year and a half...whenever I go to the eye doc. Call it luxury or whatever you like...but I love them and use them so much that it's $ well spent to me!

    I have heard good things about Zenni from others too. Maybe I'll go for a cheap pair of frames from there for riding if I decide to start going regularly in the evenings. They won't get used as much as my regular sunglasses so I don't care if they're not as awesome...just that they're serviceable and decently comfortable.

  39. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by guitarguy View Post
    If my eyes could handle contacts, I'd be wearing some cheap safety glasses for sure.
    Why no contacts?
    FAR, FAR better than glasses for riding IME.
    They take some getting used to for sure, but there are lots of brands/models that differ substantially as far as comfort level goes.
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    Quote Originally Posted by slapheadmofo View Post
    Why no contacts?
    FAR, FAR better than glasses for riding IME.
    They take some getting used to for sure, but there are lots of brands/models that differ substantially as far as comfort level goes.
    I naturally have very dry and sensitive eyes. No allergies...just always dry. I found contacts absolutely unbearable.

    I've been pondering lasik for several years and I honestly think it's only a matter of time before I bite the bullet and have it done. Eye doc says I'm a fine candidate for it.

  41. #41
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    Lasik, do it! It will put you in in the front of the pack on those group rides for sure!


    J.K. I had it done nearly 20 years ago, and it certainly was a game changer for me.

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    Quote Originally Posted by EABiker View Post
    Lasik, do it! It will put you in in the front of the pack on those group rides for sure!
    Yep...that would be the primary reason for getting it done!! Eat my 20/20 dust boys and girls.


    Quote Originally Posted by EABiker View Post
    J.K. I had it done nearly 20 years ago, and it certainly was a game changer for me.
    But yeah...I have a few friends/family that had it done tell me the same. I really do plan on having it done at some point.

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    Quote Originally Posted by guitarguy View Post
    Obviously you guys don't wear Rx glasses while doing anything active.
    You're right. Sports sent me to contacts after maybe a year of wearing glasses. Late gradeschool sometime or another. Anyway, my family could only afford 1 pair of inexpensive glasses for me, and when I broke my glasses 3 times in one weekend in a soccer tournament, it was straight to contact lenses for me. I've been wearing contacts almost exclusively for well over half my life. Probably over 2/3 of my life if I cared to figure it all out.

    Quote Originally Posted by slapheadmofo View Post
    Why no contacts?
    FAR, FAR better than glasses for riding IME.
    They take some getting used to for sure, but there are lots of brands/models that differ substantially as far as comfort level goes.
    Absolutely. I have always lived in humid climates, and even with sunglasses that ventilate well, I frequently have to take them off when I'm stopped so they don't completely obscure my vision, and so I can see when I start riding again. It'd be a lot more difficult to tolerate with Rx glasses.

    There are definitely a lot of different contact lenses out there that have vastly different properties. Some certainly don't work for me. But others work reasonably well. The only time I really pull out the glasses is when I'm just tired of wearing contacts. Either at the end of the day, if I know I'll be up for an extra long day, or when I'm camping. Much better to grab glasses when I get up in the middle of the night to go pee.

  44. #44
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    Group rides are great. I found a beginner ride group to ride with. The ride leader is excellent. He learns about each rider. Their skills, fitness levels etc. will stop frequently for regroups and to point out features coming up and their bypasses. Will make suggestions on who he thinks should try the obstacles or go the bypass. He is also very encouraging of all riders no matter their skills or equipment.

    It makes it more fun to ride with people that share your passion


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    Quote Originally Posted by HuskyDoo View Post
    Group rides are great. I found a beginner ride group to ride with. The ride leader is excellent. He learns about each rider. Their skills, fitness levels etc. will stop frequently for regroups and to point out features coming up and their bypasses. Will make suggestions on who he thinks should try the obstacles or go the bypass. He is also very encouraging of all riders no matter their skills or equipment.

    It makes it more fun to ride with people that share your passion


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    That sounds great!

    The group I rode with kinda just took off...letting the slower people (read, me) catch up at certain stop points. These were mostly convenient spots when the trail crossed a paved path.

    It was still fun, but more just do your own thing and try to keep up.

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    I guess I'm the only guy on the Rudy Project island. I bought a set of Rudy's a few years ago and mainly invested in them because I needed a good pair of shooting glasses that fit my ginormous head comfortably but they obviously also make excellent all around glasses for just about everything. The ones I have are the Magster frames but they have a gazillion different styles just like Oakley. I bought mine with the the Rx insert that goes behind the outer lenses.

    As for the group ride thing, I totally get pressuring yourself. If I went with the local group recently for the first time in a while and was really tense about it, and I know that for me is just that I want to perform at my best and be able to hang with the best of them, even if it's just an intermediate group. Fortunately I held my own and then some, even on the fat bike. Do your best to relax and ride just like you would if you were by yourself (easier said than done). Also use it as an opportunity to network with other riders who might live near by. People that you can ride with at the same level but in smaller groups. Folks that will help you perform better, support you when you're trying to improve, etc.

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    This may be a little off topic, I can't navigate this website very well and I don't know how to start a new forum so...
    I have been biking all my life trying stupid stuff until I discovered the quality mountain bike, after a few weeks I found a lightly used expert enduro and went for it. Now I am riding around everywhere with confidence and instantly picked up techniques i had been trying to do on my walmart bike. (I take to long to get to the point) And then I found one of my friends wanted to. Now, he is awsome for coming but years of pilot eating and devices have taken a toll on him, and he doesn't want to go ever again. My father came and was all cocky about how he doesn't need suspension and ended up sucking shock up until we came to a part near the road and he said we had to head back (pretty sure he was exausted). Now I need someone who will go with me and is faster. I don't care who or which group it is as long as they ride in Minneapolis trails and elm creek in Minnesota. Anyone know of any groups?

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    And yet again, sorry for being slightly off topic

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    Try posting in the Minnesota/Wisconsin forums. I'm from Minnesota, but well north of the Twin Cities.

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    Quote Originally Posted by guitarguy View Post
    One thing I noticed is they don't discuss pedaling, and they guy is never sitting. When cornering sometimes I'm sitting and just pedaling through. But I think part of it is that I slow down into the turn a lot and then coming out I'm going slow so I wanna pick back up speed.

    Bad idea? Should I be standing and coasting through most turns?
    Yeah, you will have more bike control standing in turns than sitting, and you will start to build strength, technical & balance skills. I highly recommend the GMBN channel on YouTube. They have tons of very easy to follow instructional videos and several on cornering specifically. Check it here:

    https://www.youtube.com/results?sear...gmbn+cornering

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