1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
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2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #1
    Smarter Than He Looks
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    First Clipless Pedals (help me choose)

    I'm ready to go clipless, now I just need to decide on a pedal style. I'm considering one of the dual style pedals like the Shimano PD-M424 that has a platform surrounding the 'working part' of the pedal. Is there a reason to avoid that style?

  2. #2
    In dog years, I'm dead.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sinker
    I'm ready to go clipless, now I just need to decide on a pedal style. I'm considering one of the dual style pedals like the Shimano PD-M424 that has a platform surrounding the 'working part' of the pedal. Is there a reason to avoid that style?
    I recently installed my first set of clipless pedals. I have friends that ride with the 2-sided platform syle Shimanos, & others with the 4-sided Egg Beaters. My observation is that the Egg Beaters are easier to get into. I went with the Egg Beaters. Over the winter I took a spinning class at our local YMCA. Some of the spin bikes were set up with Shimano clipless pedals, so I bought a set of SPD cleats & tried them out. The Shimano's were a little easier to release, but also sometimes released when I didn't want them to. Some of the Shimano pedals may have release pressure adjustment - the ones I tried did not. The Egg Beaters have a release-angle adjustment selectable at 15 or 20 degrees. My Egg Beaters feel much more securely attached than the Shimanos I tried. There are also some Egg Beater style pedals with platforms around them.

    One of the reasons I don't want the platform hybrids is that I want to force myself to get used to clipless riding. You'll need to retrain your panic response so that you slip your foot out to the side rather than lift them straight off of the pedal. I recommend you don't rush that process. I did, & have had some spectacular & painful crashes as a result. I'm still forcing myself, but I'm also backing off on the technical challenges for a while.

    Hope this helps.
    Whatever your hand finds to do, do it with all your might.... (Ecclesiastes 9:10)

  3. #3
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    I got into clipless a couple of months ago, and I really like it.

    I went with the Mallet M, which is the platformed eggbeater, kind of like the Shimano PD-M424. I am glad that I did. Often, I ride the bike without my riding shoes, and I think that he pedal is a lot more comfortible and secure. There is a little bump where the clip comes out of the pedal, but even with my thin soled sandles it isn't a big problem.

    Other than that bump, which made the pedals feel like they had less traction, and the added weight of the platform (which might not be especially useful if you always ride with clip shoes), there doesn't seem to be a downside.

  4. #4
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    We have the Shimano 2 sided platform style on Jason's Moto Lite and I just bought Eggbeaters for my Epiphany. I agree with everything burtronix said. He pretty much said everything for me lol!
    Jenn

  5. #5
    In dog years, I'm dead.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Krellmachine
    I got into clipless a couple of months ago, and I really like it.

    I went with the Mallet M, which is the platformed eggbeater, kind of like the Shimano PD-M424. I am glad that I did. Often, I ride the bike without my riding shoes, and I think that he pedal is a lot more comfortible and secure. There is a little bump where the clip comes out of the pedal, but even with my thin soled sandles it isn't a big problem.

    Other than that bump, which made the pedals feel like they had less traction, and the added weight of the platform (which might not be especially useful if you always ride with clip shoes), there doesn't seem to be a downside.
    Another alternative to clipless/platform hybrid pedals is a platform that clips onto your clipless pedals. I priced them at my LBS for $25. They required a set of cleats for another $25 (since I don't want to constantly swap them back-&-forth with my shoes). Sheesh! For $50 I think I'll just re-install the plaform pedals if the platform bug hits me! Actually, I think I'll see if I can find a better price on the net. I know I can get the cleats cheaper.
    Whatever your hand finds to do, do it with all your might.... (Ecclesiastes 9:10)

  6. #6
    Master of the Face Plant
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    If you ride in muddy conditions the eggbeaters are the way to go. If you ride mostly dry spd's are fine. Egg beaters have more float from side to side which makes them easy on the knees and less likely to clip out accidentally. Spd's however offer some retention adjustability that many like because you can tighten them as your cleats wear, with eggs you have to get new cleats. Eggbeaters also break easier when you slam them into rocks though the mallets may be more durable than my candy c's.

  7. #7
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    If you like cleats than the two sided things will just be a pain in the ass, and you'll want cleats on both sides. Easier to get going on a real steep hill.

  8. #8
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    I bought my first SPD's too last year and went for Crank bros eggbeaters because of weight and good reviews- I found them great, easy to get used to. I was very worried about falling while in clipless but touch wood the 5 or 6 times I've nose dived the I've come unstuck from my pedals without a problem.

  9. #9
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    If you decide to go with a clipless pedal without a platform you should really take a look at the Shimano M520's. There the best first set of clipless pedals in my opinion. Heck, I started on them 3 years ago and I still use them.

  10. #10
    College Boy
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    I am a huge fan of the clipless pedals with a plateform. They are heavy, cost more and I have heard they are not very easy to get in and out of.

    I am a huge fan of the shimano M520's I been using them for years and so has my brother and they have servered us both very well over the years. They ahve taken multiple hard rock hits and only show scratchs for their years of use.

    The m520s are one of the best first clipless pedals some one can get and even for some one who been riding clipless for a while they are still great. Not to expensive and just work great all around.

  11. #11
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    I've been using the Shimano M424s for nearly a year and I think they're great, but I have nothing to compare them to. Easy to unclip, and don't unclip accidentally. Also very easy to clip in. The platform allows you to ride through rough stuff with a foot unclipped. I bought them initially because I have one bike and I also use it for daily commute in city traffic so I thought it would be ideal to wear regular shoes for that. However, it was so easy to clip in and out that I now just wear my cleats all the time.

  12. #12
    Gravity works
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    I bought some Wellgo rodeo pedals and lake shoes (only pair of size 15's I could find) with a recessed cleat about six months ago. Fantastic set up. Easy to clip in and out of. Use the platform side for unfamiliar trails and switch to SPD side when your spinning. They do hold some mud, but so far I haven't been in a situation where I haven't been able to clip in.
    A beginner since 1976

    I still have to explain to my wife how a 46 year old likes to get down and play in the mud.

  13. #13
    local trails rider
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    I am really happy with my Time ATAC pedals. If you want a platform, Time Z would be pretty good too.

  14. #14
    Smarter Than He Looks
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    Thanks for the great info (I love this place). As others said, I'm worried that if I go with a clipless w/platform combo I'll 'cheat' towards the platforms more than I need to. Maybe I should just get the M520s and be done with it.

  15. #15
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    Right now I am using the Shimano PD-M505 w/ the Shimano SM-PD22 Platforms Adapters (Reflectors in reality) because it came stock on the bike.

    The SM-PD22 can be removed so both sides are clipless.

    I should add I haven't ridden a bicycle in many years and until I get used to actually riding it without any hesitation, I will be slowly getting into the habit of using the clipless side of the PD-505's.

    Once I feel 100% sure of myself, I will be swapping them out for the Shimano PD-540's full clipless.

    Basically, it may be a cost efficent way for you to go by getting the SM-PD22 with the PD-520 (since that is the pedel of your choice) and just wear the normal shoes until you get to the park that has a tree to lean against and plenty of soft grass to land on.

    Then pull out the clipless shoes from the backpack and put those on and practice - that is my plan

  16. #16
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    I've got both, a pair of Shimano M424s (my first foray into clipless) and some Crank Bros Candy Cs. Personal preference is the Crank Bros as they have more float but for an entry into the clipless world, the 424s were the right choice. They are spring loaded so the front end pops up making entry pretty easy (to do without looking), they have a tension adjust feature so you can lighten the release pressure and the resin cage is pretty bash resistent.

    Candy C's are probably as small of a platform as I'll go, there's just enough meat on them to use with normal shoes when tooling around my driveway.

    Combine with some Specialized Taho shoes and you'll be happy with the clipless world.
    Happiness depends more on the inward disposition of mind than on outward circumstances. Benjamin Franklin

  17. #17
    backwoods and backwards
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    Truth is that most of the clipless pedals out there are pretty good, and you'll find that every system has a very faithful following. I just switched to time from spd after about 8 years, all is good. If you buy at your local shop, they might offer to set up your cleats with a rotation adjustment device, a nifty tool that finds the optimal placement for your pedaling position. Well worth looking into since it makes finding the pedal/clipping in almost intuitive.Learning with a poorly set up system can be a nightmare, even if all the components are perfect.

  18. #18
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    If you go clip less... go all the way!
    I bought the dual sided Shimano pedal, And since I have gotten used to the clip less pedal I donít like riding un clipped.
    At first I was really skittish about using a non platform pedal.

    I wish I would have gotten a full clip less pedal now!

    Especially when your going down a hill and you want to unclip and put your foot out for a sharp corner. Its hard to clip back in with a dual sided pedal, you have to fumble around trying to find the correct side of the pedal while hauling arse down a hill.

    So I learned a $69 dollar lesson. Well if I buy another set of pedals it will be about $169 dollar lesson. Which I am planning on buying some full clip less pedals soon.


    Hey you want to by some dual sided pedals????????

  19. #19
    Rod
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    The only reason I would suggest not going clipless all the way is if you commute around town and woudln't want to be walking through a store in your cycling shoes. I have a pair of clipless pedals that cost 60 bucks, but now Jenson usa has them on sale for 30. They're great pedals. I have never came out of them on accident and they always work well even in mud. They're a small platform egg beater style pedal.

  20. #20
    College Boy
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    Quote Originally Posted by Radney
    The only reason I would suggest not going clipless all the way is if you commute around town and woudln't want to be walking through a store in your cycling shoes. I have a pair of clipless pedals that cost 60 bucks, but now Jenson usa has them on sale for 30. They're great pedals. I have never came out of them on accident and they always work well even in mud. They're a small platform egg beater style pedal.
    I have never had a problem on my m520's. I bike to school all the time just wearing my every day shoes and leave my biking shoes at home. Hell for short little trips I have never had problem just using my clipless pedals as platforms. Now I would not do any hard riding with out my shoes but then again the stuff you listed is just the hope on your bike and use it as a form of transporation a short distance and the platform size of the m520s is just fine. Hell I gone done a few hill unclip with out a problem. Yeah will admit if you are using the m520s as platform pedals they are not as nice as normal platforms but then again I went clipless for a reason and it few times I ride with out my biking shoes it works out just fine.

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