1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #1
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    New question here. first bike recommendations/suggestions?

    I'm selling my car and replacing it with a bike. If I can get $6500 for he car, my bike budget will be $1500. I'll be using the bike mainly to get to and from appointments; grocery shopping; and just getting around. Would a hybrid be best for me? fwiw, I just measured my in-seam, and it's around 33 inches. I'm 5' 7" and weigh roughly 175 pounds. Keep in mind that I haven't ridden a bike in at least 25 years. With my expected budget, along with my background, which bikes should I look at?

    Thank you.

  2. #2
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    Are you wanting to ride the bike off road at all? Maybe going out on some local trails at the weekend. Or is it going to be purely for town/road use?

  3. #3
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    not likely; recently had total hip replacement, so balance/stability is my main concern.

  4. #4
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    Then you are probably on the right track with a hybrid or city bike.
    They have road biased tyres but still a wide range of gears, and the riding position is more relaxed/comfortable.

  5. #5
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    Thanks, lotusdriver

  6. #6
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    Transport - Trek Bicycle

    a bike like this?

  7. #7
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    Not unless you want to carry a load of stuff with you, maybe if you are a window cleaner!

    Have a look at the Trek 7.4 FX for the kind of bike you are looking for.

  8. #8
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    Is this your year round primary transportation? A fat bike like you see in the Cargo Bike section should be an option.
    Cargo Bikes

  9. #9
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    Yes, this will be my year-round, do-everything bike. I'll check out the cargo bikes. Thanks!

  10. #10
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    Well, l guess if you want to carry that much stuff with you.
    I have never seen a "cargo bike" here in the UK, at least not out on the road. So am not familiar with that branch of cycling.

    Maybe it is a good idea over in the USA where the weather is better.

  11. #11
    Clueless genius
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    Really, any touring bike would be a good fit for what it sounds like you want to do. Plenty of places to mount fenders, racks, panniers, bags, etc. More upright geometry for long distance comfort, sometimes flat bars and sometimes drop bars. Even a steel cyclocross bike (Provided it has rack and fender mounts) would be a good option!
    2009 GT Sanction 2.0
    2007 C'dale Prophet 5
    1994 C'dale M400

  12. #12
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    How about these three?

    520
    7.4 FX
    CrossRip

  13. #13
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    Are you going to by using this for grocery shopping during the winter?
    If you think you may ride in snowy conditions, then a fat bike with wider tires could be a fun option.

  14. #14
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    yes, I will most likely be riding in the winter, eb1888...have any 'fat tire' bikes in mind?

    Thank you.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by NHBiker2013 View Post
    yes, I will most likely be riding in the winter, eb1888...have any 'fat tire' bikes in mind?

    Thank you.
    If you can start a thread in this section or read some others I think you will get some good recommendations.
    Fat Bikes

    And of course test riding for fit is free and a good info source.

  16. #16
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    Thanks...sorry about that.

  17. #17
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    Re: first bike recommendations/suggestions?

    Where do you live and what weather do experience? I would never get a fat bike as my only bike.

    Also, there is no need to spend $1500. For a daily use bike, a $300 used beater bike is the perfect bike, I'd put a bike rack in the back.. You can lock it up without it being targeted by thieves, its more secure. Different larger tires for winter maybe.

    A bike might not play friendly with your hip, you might try and incline bike, spending less now will give you more options later.

    Check the commuter subforum on here. Those riders are very experienced and you'll find better guidance there IMHO.

  18. #18
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    I live in NH, where the winters are long, cold, and snowy.

    I plan on around $700 or $800.

    Off I go to the commuter sub-forum. Thanks!

  19. #19
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    I just ordered a Schwinn Protocol 1.0 Men's Dual-Suspension Mountain Bike (26-Inch Wheels, Red)
    Sports

  20. #20
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    I'd cancel that order. That would be my last pick bike for commuting.

    This costco bike gives better value imho, but there are often better deals.
    Northrock XC6 bike 3x8, 18" and 19.5" $379 at costco

  21. #21
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    The Shwinn Protocol 1.0 is one of those very cheap full suspension bikes, selling at about 300 in the UK.
    It will work, but will be very heavy and clunky. The suspension will move but it won't be much help and the cable front disc brake will be marginal at best. The gears will work but you will always be adjusting them, and various parts on the bike will soon go rusty as the chrome plating peels off.

    On flat roads it will probably roll well, as these heavy bikes often do. It will be useable but it won't do you any favours.
    At the very least call the bike shop and pay the extra for the Protocol 2.0.
    At least that one has a SRAM drivetrain.
    Although it is still made from steel, so will probably weigh as much as a small car.

  22. #22
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    order canceled, new order placed at Bob'sbicycles.com for a 2013 Flightline

  23. #23
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    That looks a lot better!

    I think you will be much happier with that one, than the Schwinn.

  24. #24
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    thank you. It'll be my first bike of any kind in 25 years.

  25. #25
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    I skimmed the thread last night and glanced in the commuting forum this morning.

    While it wouldn't have been my choice, I think a hardtail MTB is a much better place to start than either a FS or a hybrid. They're basically the Dutch bikes of our country.

    For commuting, I found I wanted a lot of accessories. I had a powerful headlight and multi-LED blinker, and my commuters have had a rack and fenders. I have the Kryptonite NY U-lock, which is probably good enough for most places outside Manhattan.

    What to wear can be tricky. I used to commute a little over two miles. It was long enough that a jacket that didn't breathe well could be a real bummer and my shoes would get sprayed with water and I'd get rained on on wet days, but short enough that I didn't really want to pull on the spandex and change at my destination, which can be awkward. For me, the key was a wind resistant hoodie on most days and a really expensive cycling specific rain jacket when it actually rained. On rainy days, I also wore some gore-tex pants I'd chewed up snowboarding and some gore-tex running shoes. This meant I'd get to school wearing clothing I could wear all day, except the jacket and pants on days I wore those. Once I had an office, I left a sweater there for those days.

    For longer commutes, wearing more cycling clothes and changing at the office can be the way to go.

    For commuting, I think clipless pedals are overrated. I like 'em on bikes I ride as a sport, but toe clips work with whatever shoe I happen to be wearing. That's one less thing to store, and one step less messing around.

    For short commutes, I like a messenger bag. Around a half hour or if there's a major climb, I prefer a pannier.

    Those douchey little cycling caps are great for bad weather and helmet hair reduction. I have a couple.

    Leave nothing removable without a tool on your bike when you walk away from it.

    Don't be afraid to take the lane. If there's not enough space for a car to pass you comfortably on the left, you're less likely to get clipped, IMO, when you're riding in the passenger-side wheel track. Don't ride in the gutter. That's for garbage, and usually doesn't have enough space to either side. Signal your turns, and place yourself for left turns (or not to turn right when a lane gets tacked on) as you would in a car.

    What else... slick tires are nice but unnecessary when the roads are dry or only have water on them. Knobbies are enough for snow but not black ice. I haven't tried studded tires.

    Sometimes, the ride to work can be the nicest part of the day. Usually my days go at least a little better than that. Be safe and have fun. You'll figure out what stuff you do and don't care about.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

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