1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 37
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    25

    First bike, maintanance, xc ht on road

    Greetings everyone,

    That's my first post on this forum, but i have read lot of stuff here in the past few days. I have some questions and i couldn't find a more suitable place To do them.

    1. I am searching, more than i should for sure, to buy a new bike. I live in a city but i really enjoy some Mountain biking, trails and such. The thing is to reach the nearest trails i will need To bike at least 20km (40km with the return). Also i may need To go To my work or university if it has a nice sunny day which is about 30km total. I chose to look for a xc ht 29er, cause with my little theoritical knowledge, it is the lighter (good for my daily routine) and also can give me a decent amount of riding Mountain trails! Is my logic right? Did i chose the appropriate type?

    2. If the answer is yes, i am thinking to buy a bike like cube sl Ltd (~1400euro). Everyone is telling me that is wrong and i should spend 500-700 euro for my first bike and that is stupid To buy a bike like this. And my question is : the Bike will 'suffer' with the daily road use and he ll need a lot of maintanance? In my mind things like the fork fox FLOAT CTD 32 won't be damaged at all on road so i won't have To worry about that... Am i wrong on that?

    If anyone has the specific bike or any scott scale 950 i would be grateful if he share his experiences with me!

    Thanks in advance!

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    2,459
    Where do you plan on storing it? For a commuter that would be my first concern. You can't just lock up an expensive bike and hope for the best. I would probably buy two bikes. The fork, you will be adding wear, but its not a major concern if you keep up with the maintenance.

    Another thing is tires. Riding on concrete with xc tires will wear them out pretty quickly. Just riding my bike a few miles to the trail I can see my rear tire wearing down quickly.

    Sent from my 831C using Tapatalk

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    25
    Quote Originally Posted by ou2mame View Post
    Where do you plan on storing it? For a commuter that would be my first concern. You can't just lock up an expensive bike and hope for the best. I would probably buy two bikes. The fork, you will be adding wear, but its not a major concern if you keep up with the maintenance.

    Another thing is tires. Riding on concrete with xc tires will wear them out pretty quickly. Just riding my bike a few miles to the trail I can see my rear tire wearing down quickly.

    Sent from my 831C using Tapatalk
    Inside my uni and next To me on work so storage would not be a problem for me. As far as maintanance would not suffer at all with the road use right?

    I ll buy a second set of road tyres if i use it daily on road!

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    2,459
    The fork is still being used on the road.. Maybe not as vigorously as on a technical trail, but i would still do the required maintenence intervals.

    Sent from my 831C using Tapatalk

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    25
    Quote Originally Posted by ou2mame View Post
    The fork is still being used on the road.. Maybe not as vigorously as on a technical trail, but i would still do the required maintenence intervals.

    Sent from my 831C using Tapatalk
    This fork needs typically service every 100 hours and it costs ~70 euro. The LBS told me that this is very typical and with rough Mountain use and i will be Ok with 1, max 2 services per year!! Should i believe him?

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    2,459
    It really depends on how much you ride the bike. I hit 100 hours in a month and a half, maybe less depending on what I do during the week. You can do the work yourself though instead of paying them. I dunno.. If you want to go past the service intervals, it's kinda like changing the oil in your car.. You might not notice the difference right away, but it will definitely affect the overall longevity.

    Sent from my 831C using Tapatalk

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    5,573
    Fox forks like the most maintenance. But there are vids for doing it yourself.
    The Cube is well spec'ed with good geo. I don't like to spend on aluminum hard tails.
    A carbon bike with compliance is more capable and comfortable.
    I'd suggest this Canyon.
    Canyon | Mountainbikes | Grand Canyon CF SL 29 6.9

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    288
    ^kinda makes sense but u would like a carbon bike as a daily commuter? u would need to bubble wrap that thing.. chaining it to postst, next to other bikes, risk of crashes.. not like carbon bikes are made out of paper but commuters usually takes most abuses, so that might be nice but impractical...

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    5,573
    Quote Originally Posted by joel787 View Post
    ^kinda makes sense but u would like a carbon bike as a daily commuter? u would need to bubble wrap that thing.. chaining it to postst, next to other bikes, risk of crashes.. not like carbon bikes are made out of paper but commuters usually takes most abuses, so that might be nice but impractical...
    No one rides road bikes except carbon these days because of the comfort compliance.
    If you are just getting one bike you might as well really enjoy yourself commuting and on the trails. This mtb can handle any road surface abuse it will ever encounter better than any road bike.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    25
    @eb1888 i know Canyon and i liked it a lot, but i read a a lot about their frame and that many people order and they have To send them back and w8 a lot till Canyon replace it. That's why i stopped looking at them..

    Also about carbon, i think i ll choose alloy for my first bike, cause carbon is more fragile and i am inexperienced... Is better To fall with alloy ;-)

    Thanks a lot for the suggestions thought. Does anyone has Canyon experience?

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    2,459
    I really wouldn't ever chain a high priced bike to anything... If you do say goodbye lol

    Even just going into a store for a few minutes. There are bikes getting stolen from the bike stores out here in long Island today, nevermind bikes outside.

    Sent from my 831C using Tapatalk

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    288
    1,400eu is a good budget, why not get 2 bikes? nice mtg for the weekends and a cheap road/cx bike for a daily banger

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    25
    Quote Originally Posted by joel787 View Post
    1,400eu is a good budget, why not get 2 bikes? nice mtg for the weekends and a cheap road/cx bike for a daily banger
    I will prolly Do that as soon as i finish paying this bike in about 6 months! If i see that the Bike need a lot of maintanance and Its Hard To Do my everyday use ofcourse!

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    5,573
    Quote Originally Posted by Spanias Harris View Post
    @eb1888 i know Canyon and i liked it a lot, but i read a a lot about their frame and that many people order and they have To send them back and w8 a lot till Canyon replace it. That's why i stopped looking at them..

    Also about carbon, i think i ll choose alloy for my first bike, cause carbon is more fragile and i am inexperienced... Is better To fall with alloy.
    Every manufacturer, because of the nature of offroad biking, will have product failures.
    But the riding you are going to be doing is at the bottom range in terms of stress on a product designed as a mtb. A failure is possible but not probable enough to be part of a rational decision.
    Carbon is not fragile, as every material can fail.
    Santa Cruz has a good technical video.
    Pinkbike Visits The Santa Cruz Test Lab Video - YouTube
    with the non technical test at the end.
    You are denying yourself the best product options.

    Another slightly higher cost bike frame which I personally ride is the Trek Superfly 9.6.
    Compliance engineering from Trek's top quality road bike division brought to their mtb frames.
    New geo which rides and tracks to perfection fast or slow.
    Lifetime warranty.

    I've been riding it over rocks and roots every day this season with zero problems.

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    25
    @eb1888 Thanks for the infos.

    Trek Superfly 9.6 is 2,500$ which is almost double price of what i am looking, but thanks for the suggestion.

    I mean that as an amateur i ll fall for sure many times and its better to have an alloy bike instead of a carbon cause i can damage it easier!

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    5,573
    Quote Originally Posted by Spanias Harris View Post
    I mean that as an amateur i ll fall for sure many times and its better to have an alloy bike instead of a carbon cause i can damage it easier!
    At your level and with the type of equipment you are choosing mountain biking is a slow speed exercise. Falls are low impact. Much less than the beating they gave that carbon frame at the end of the video I hope you watched. Consider that same degree of force applied to an aluminum frame. It would have dented badly on the first impact.
    Enough so that you would have replaced it.
    Carbon handlebars are another example. The damping benefits and significant weight savings makes them a good choice. Mine have repeatedly taken hits against trees, some flipping me right off the bike, or the rocky ground with no adverse effects. I would not choose aluminum.

    The Trek may be outside your budget. The Canyon is comparable and that much better of a great value long-term in your location.
    After all, you will be riding more fun/difficult trails in the future with that bike.

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    25
    I saw the video, nevertheless my budget is max 1400 euro and the carbon bikes, except canyon's but they didnt even reply to me yet, are all >1600 euro!

    I would love grand canyon bike but i don't know if they want cash or i can arrange doses or if even they still have problems with their frames! If they reply me soon enough and i can buy a bike with doses then i ll ask some canyon riders and see if they have any complains about their bike!

    If something of all above can't be done, then i ll buy ltd sl or scale 950. The Canyon is the prettiest bike in this price range !

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    5,573
    I've followed the development of that carbon bike, although it isn't available in the US. If it was, I would own one. Their Customer Service Group has always been helpful and prompt whenever I have emailed them.
    Here is some review info. Imo it is a very well engineered and designed option- in some locations it is by far the best value. And a top quality frame.
    Canyon Presents 2013 CF SLX Carbon Hard Tail 29"ers

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    25
    Still Canyon's carbon is >1700. The canyon i would choose was the Grand Canyon SLX 7.9 which is 100 euro less (i guess with shipping would be about the same as the others) and by 800 grams ligther! But i ll see...So far the lowest price between cube / scott, found cube with 1365 euro in 6 doses. If that doesn't change the next days i ll go for that!

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    5,573
    Good luck. Sometimes a product you will use often and rely on can be worth the additional when it is exceptional. The jump between an aluminum bike and the Canyon carbon with compliance is a major one.

  21. #21
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    25
    True i get your point. But the budget is already stretched for 1400 for my 1st bike, so i can't raise it more cause i ll end up in jail

  22. #22
    mtbr member
    Reputation: wickerman1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    3,272
    Quote Originally Posted by eb1888 View Post
    No one rides road bikes except carbon these days because of the comfort compliance.
    If you are just getting one bike you might as well really enjoy yourself commuting and on the trails. This mtb can handle any road surface abuse it will ever encounter better than any road bike.
    Really? well I guess im no one, i ride steel road bike and its not old its only 2 years old. my cross bike also steel, and im going to order a steel frame for my ht 29. carbon is nice but if any damage to the frame, it is done.

  23. #23
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    5,573
    Carbon doesn't damage easily but it is easy to repair in many cases.
    I'm no one too. My road is an 80 Raleigh Pro with updates.
    I wouldn't go for steel over my SF 9.8 because the compliance and light weight are not matched by something in steel.
    But the subject is a comparison between aluminum and carbon for the OP not the rest of the universe.
    I don't see as much value in an aluminum hardtail when you start to spend more than $1000.

  24. #24
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    25
    Μaybe i need a bike like this Hardtail 29er 'Gives Immediate Confidence Boost' On Tough Trails, Says Reviewer | Gear Review | Gear Junkie ! ?

    Everyone tends to tell me that the bikes i am looking are pure designed for XC races and i will need a bike more for general use - trails, especially if i want to experience a bit of downhill!

    What's your opinion ?

  25. #25
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    2,459
    A bit of downhill will be dangerous on an xc.. You're missing 20lbs is metal.

    Sent from my 831C using Tapatalk

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Shimano Hydraulic Disc Brake Maintanance
    By deadone in forum Brake Time
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 09-02-2013, 07:40 PM
  2. Road bike restoration...worth it? 1998 Miyata road bike
    By nycstripes in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 05-30-2013, 11:15 AM
  3. Maintanance of steel and rust?
    By tangaroo in forum Fat Bikes
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 11-02-2012, 09:42 AM
  4. trail maintanance
    By SHIVER ME TIMBERS in forum California - Socal
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: 11-29-2011, 05:06 PM
  5. FYI enduro seal 32 talas maintanance fluid change
    By terrible in forum Shocks and Suspension
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 07-15-2011, 08:35 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •