1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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Thread: first bike

  1. #1
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    first bike

    I need some help on deciding which bike i should choose,im looking at a used 2010 trek fuel ex 8 in good shape or a new 2012 x caliber,im 36 years old 6 ft 175lbs and getting back into biking,i have not rode in 15 years and like staying active,i run alot but have a few back problems and decided to start biking,i will ride just for fun and plan on doing a few small jumps,i will ride local woods and turkey mountain in tulsa,plus ride it on the rode with my 3 kids,is the lifetime warr worth it,thanks for your input.

  2. #2
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    Unless you are positive about what you are getting into with a used bike ( suspension wear, damaged derailleurs, broken/missing cogs, un-truable rims), go with a new one. There is nothing quite like the feel of a brand new bike ( and being the one to ding it up ; ) Both will be fun on Turkey Mountain - plenty o peeps ride both. You will like the speed of the 29er. Can you test-ride any of them from a shop?

    FYI - there is a race at Turkey in September. Google "Tour de Dirt." Great way to meet people!
    If its not a bumpy ride, I'm not interested.

  3. #3
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    Personally for me for a first bike in a new area of cycling I like to go with something used that I can throw around a bit and not worry too much about smashing up before investing in something nicer once I get my skills up a little bit, but thats just me, both are solid bikes and you couldn't go wrong with either.

  4. #4
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    I too would go with a new bike. Too many ghosts can be hiding in a used bike.

  5. #5
    Flow like water
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eyetattoo View Post
    I too would go with a new bike. Too many ghosts can be hiding in a used bike.
    I like ghosts. If you don't, there are simple ceremonies to get them to leave.

    I also don't pay new prices for used gear. New is good, though, if you do not have the experience to check out a used bike. Some things have changed in 15 years. Others are not much different.

  6. #6
    Single(Pivot)and Happy
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    Proper fitment is the Number One determining factor everyone needs to pay attention to. Forks, wheelset, color, # of gears and raving positive reviews mean nothing if the bike you buy doesn't properly fit YOU.

    The only way you can be properly fitted for a bike is either knowing a rider that is knowledgeble in proper bike fitment or finding a bike shop with employees that know how to conduct proper bike fitment. Raising or lowering the seatpost IS NOT bike fitment. Simply swapping stems IS NOT bike fitment.

    The OP mentions having a "few back problems". A "good" bike shop with knowledgeble staff will not only be able to provide proper bike fitment, but also let you test out a couple of options. The shop will also be able to swap out parts to dial-in the best riding position that takes into consideration your existing back issues.

    The Trek Fuel EX8 is a very good trail bike which I have saddle time on. If it doesn't properly fit you or you start throwing money into it arbitrarily buying stems, seatposts, handlebars etc, you can expect more back pain issues and a much lighter wallet.
    The suspension of your bike sucks if it's different than mine. Really. It sucks. Big time.

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