1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1
    mtbr member
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    Finally bought some Bikes

    Hello everybody. I would assume I am on the upper end of the age curve being 42. The last 6 months have been a fitness mission for me. I have been borrowing bikes from my friends, and trying different types of riding. XC is just awesome, and I also love sprinting asphalt hills on a Cyclocross bike, then cutting thru fields and easy trails on the way home. I was losing sleep trying to decide which bike to buy. So I comprimised with myself. I got them both. Bought them used. Which brings me to my first question. What are the must carry items when out for a extended ride of 3 hours or more? These must fit in a camel back, or a small wedge pack. Thanks for any suggestions!

  2. #2
    The Martian
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    Congrats on the new rides! I wish I were so lucky.

    I tend to overprepare, so I'll try to boil my list down to what I absolutely wouldn't leave home without (for a 3hr ride).

    Must haves:
    ANY ride:
    Water
    ID, insurance, and credit card ($20 is not a bad idea either)
    Helmet
    Cell phone

    3hr time frame:
    Spare tube, patch kit, pump
    multitool
    basic first aid kit
    food of some sort (energy bar, granola bar, etc)

    I have a medium sized camelbak and all of this fits (as well as lube (I'd loose the stuff otherwise), flashlight, keys, ipod, maps, and a LARGE first aid kit (I am paid to ride with a group (college class) so I have a splint, CPR mask, the works...)). The camelbak had plenty of room to spare until I beefed up my first aid kit, so you should be more than fine even with a smaller camelbak.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
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    How about a shock pump? Thinks thats needed?

  4. #4
    Still learning
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    Maybe I just haven't been around long enough but I've never (ever) heard of anyone actually needing a shock pump while out on the trails.

  5. #5
    Currently in Exile
    Reputation: Frozenspokes's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LarsXC
    How about a shock pump? Thinks thats needed?
    If you need a shock pump on a ride, your shock needs to be rebuilt or replaced. They can leak some air over extended periods of time, but they shouldn't leak that much. I will generally top mine off about once every other month or so.
    "There are those who would say there's something pathological about the need to ride, and they're probably on to something. I'd wager though that most of the society-approved compulsions leave deeper scars in the psyche than a need to go and ride a bicycle on a mountain." Cam McRea

  6. #6
    Former Bike Wrench
    Reputation: mtnbiker72's Avatar
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    good to have at first

    Quote Originally Posted by LarsXC
    How about a shock pump? Thinks thats needed?
    When ever I get a new bike or shock, I'll carry one to play with my settings. But once I find a pressure I like, it stays home.

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