1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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Thread: Entry Road Bike

  1. #1
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    Entry Road Bike

    I'm looking for an entry level roadbike but I'm a total newb in road stuff.

    I really fancy Specialized Bicycle Components but i'm clueless about groups and stiffness and design on a roadbike..

    I want a road bike for some cruising/training on the road between my MTB rides.
    Price about 1200$ not more then 1400$

    Anyone got some advice on nice roadbikes?

  2. #2
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    For 2013, Shimano road bicycle groupsets include:
    Dura-Ace Di2 [9070] (11 speed electronic)
    Dura-Ace [9000] (11 speed)
    Dura-Ace Track [7710] (NJS-approved, which is a requirement of all bicycle components used in professional Keirin racing in Japan)
    Ultegra Di2 [6870] (11 speed electronic)
    Ultegra Di2 [6770] (10 speed electronic)
    Ultegra [6800] (11 speed)
    Ultegra [6700] (10 speed)
    105 [5700] (10 speed)
    Tiagra [4600] (10 speed, 9 speed on older models)
    Sora [3500] (9 speed, 8 speed on older models)
    Claris [2400] (8 speed)

    SRAM Double Tap shifting technology:
    SRAM Red22
    SRAM Red 2012
    SRAM Black Red (Introduced 2011)
    SRAM Force22
    SRAM Force
    SRAM Rival
    SRAM Apex (Introduced for 2010)

    Personally I would look for a lightly used entry level road bike, especially if you are not sure if you will enjoy it. Many people go out and spend 1500 bucks and find out being a roadie is not for them, or they just dont have time and it sits in the garage.

  3. #3
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    I find my self riding my mtb on the streets when I dont have the time to clean my bike or take a ride to the woods.. I'm fine with riding on the road, looked at some used bikes but it's hard to find a decent one in size and price.

    What brands are best to look at?
    Canyon/ridley/..?

  4. #4
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    I ride a lot on the road as well, but I just invested in a second wheelset, a cassette and Panaracer Protex road tires. It ran me about $350 for everything and just saves me trouble from swapping out tires, which I did for a while.

    I was looking at a road bike as well, but I think I'll be getting a hybrid like the BMC Alpenchallenge or a KHS Vitamin A

  5. #5
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    Road bikes are kind of like running shoes: it's really important that they fit, and everything else is of much less importance.

    Try a bunch of bikes and buy your favorite. Try to ride at least one that's too small and one that's too big, so you get a sense of what that feels like.

    Two things I wish I knew when I bought my first one are that the brake hoods are the home spot for a roadie's hands and the riding position is pretty much the same as for cross-country mountain biking.

    Disc brakes are a nice feature on road bikes. So if you like the one in your link when you ride it, awesome. Just make sure to try some others too.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  6. #6
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    anyone got experience with planet-x? Planet X Pro Carbon Shimano Ultegra Road Bike 999.99 | Planet X looks too cheap for ultrega + carbon frame

  7. #7
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    Procure spare Wheelset
    Procure road tyres
    Procure spare Cassette
    Take current MTB switch Suspension to "lock"

    Stir well with love in a mixing bowl and bake for a few minutes. Boom you have an urban tank.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brockwan View Post
    Procure spare Wheelset
    Procure road tyres
    Procure spare Cassette
    Take current MTB switch Suspension to "lock"

    Stir well with love in a mixing bowl and bake for a few minutes. Boom you have an urban tank.
    Urban tank is not an option riding a fully atm with disk breaks, wouldn't look/roll well me thinks can't fully lock rear susp even.. would have smoothest of rides tho haha

  9. #9
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    Entry Road Bike

    Quote Originally Posted by Restyle View Post
    Urban tank is not an option riding a fully atm with disk breaks, wouldn't look/roll well me thinks can't fully lock rear susp even.. would have smoothest of rides tho haha
    I hear ya, my current urban tank...


    When I ride it, it kind of takes corners like the bat bike. You roll from side to side. It's heavy but it beats rehab on an exercise bike!


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  10. #10
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    It was mentioned before, but ride a bunch of bikes and it's important that the bike fits you. For your budget, you shouldn't have a problem finding a 105/Apex level aluminum bike. I got into road riding on a Specialized Allez Sport, which I think is a great starter bike, and a couple of months ago sold that and upgraded to the Race Rival version of the Allez. 4 lbs lighter and better spec'd...it was a good decision.

  11. #11
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    In your budget cruise your local craigslist for a cannondale caad9 or caad10. With either a 105 or rival build it should fit right into your range.
    Those bikes are legit.
    If you find that that's too aggressive for your taste look also for a giant defy or spesh allez. They're all somewhat comparable in price tho the caad frames carry much more street cred if that matters.

    Adrws.... is right. Fit fit fit. It's all about the fit. So even if you find a spankin deal resist if its not the exact right size.

  12. #12
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    +5 on the fit question. It would be worthwhile to spend a few extra bucks at a shop where they are willing to spend some time and find the right size for you. Even when you get the bike, you should consider having it fit to you. Some shops may do this for free if you buy the bike from them, or some may charge up to 150. Point is, if it don't fit you will not ride it.

    You should be able to get into a reasonable road bike for $1200. The CAD 10 is a great bike you can get into for about this range.

    Last point and bring on the haters! A mountainbike with slicks is not a road bike. Sure it may be fine for cruising around town, but if you get to the point of riding this more and putting in longer and longer rides, you will learn that a road bike is better suited. Look at it this way, I can ride my road bike on many trails. It gets by and kind of does the job, but it's limited. Same goes the other way. Who knows, you may even start to like it.
    - 2013 Pivot Mach 429 C
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  13. #13
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    Identify how you want to ride this bike and what your goals are for riding.

    There are different categories of "road" bikes, just as there are different categories of mountain bikes.

    Actual racing, and pretending to race on group rides doesn't appeal to me. While I can appreciate a go-fast racy road bike, it's not my cuppa tea when it comes to the bike I choose to take out for a ride.

    I like a little more comfort, with a little bit more of a relaxed mentality when I ride. To be honest, I have the same mentality when I ride my mtb. But anyway...

    Check out cyclocross bikes, touring bikes, and gravel grinder bikes, too. They all have some variation on road bike geometry, with different capabilities. These three types, for example, tend to have capacity for larger volume tires that provide a little more cush/comfort. Cyclocross bikes and gravel grinders will have more racy/aggressive geometry, while a touring bike with have more relaxed geometry.

    While I don't tour, I found the relaxed touring geometry to be what I was looking for. I have tires ranging from 32mm wide to 38mm wide that I will use depending on the season and where I plan on riding. Most road bikes you will find on the market will have a hard time with anything larger than 25mm tires. Great bikes if you want to hammer and go fast. But if that's not your thing, you might as well look at different bikes.

    I suspect this is at least part of the reason why so many folks buy road bikes and never use them. The other main one being that a lot of people don't actually like riding on the road. Sharing with drivers who don't want to share or who are oblivious (really, you HAVE to expect that every car is trying to kill you to go very far) is one big reason a lot of people don't like riding on the road.

    If you don't know if you will like/tolerate riding on the road, I'd avoid spending a bunch of money immediately. Go ride on the road with your mtb for awhile.

    I started riding my existing mtb on the road, when the trails were too wet, or when I just wanted to ride out my door to the trails without driving. I didn't even bother buying road tires for it. I just replaced my knobbies when they wore out. After a few years, I got an inexpensive mtb for commuting and those rides when the trails were too wet (mostly spring rides when I HAD to get out, but the trails were pure slop). I did this with a couple of mtb's. It took quite some time before I actually bought a real road bike for riding on the road.

  14. #14
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    I love riding my road bike. (it's actually a 'cross bike)

    I find it much more fun to ride on the road than the slick tired MTB I was riding before I got the CX bike. It handles better, is faster, lighter, and feels much more nimble. I still ride it like the MTB, I bunny hop it, jump it up/down curbs, and even take it in the dirt once in a while.

    The drop bars took some getting used to, but the thought has now crossed my mind that I'd like drops on my MTB, lol.

    One thing with road bikes is that they're even more expensive than MTB's in a lot of cases to get good components. Looking at the prices, and considering they have rigid forks, you wonder why the cost is so high.

    My Ridley retailed for 1,995 when new, and spec wise IMO it's nothing special (Full carbon fork (tapered), SRAM Rival and the wheels are mid level at best). I paid much less than that, but even then I still had a hard time pulling the trigger on it. I'm glad I did though, I love it. I use it way more than the MTB, I've put a little over 1k miles on it since I got it in late April.

    Not saying you need to buy a CX bike, but for me it was a tad more versatile than a road bike. Plus of course CX racing looked like so much damn fun! And it was, I did a race and had a blast.

    If I were to do it again though, I'd definitely shell out the extra cash for disks. Canti's suck.

    It might be a good idea to rent/demo one for the day to see how you like it after a few miles. A parking lot test ride doesn't tell you a lot.

    If getting fitted on one wasn't so important, I'd say check out the Sette Forza bikes from Pricepoint. They have a full carbon road bike with a complete 105 group for 1,299. It's an amazing value.

    Also, Competitive Cyclist has some good deals on Ridleys.
    '13 Salsa Horsethief 2
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    '11 Ridley X-Ride

  15. #15
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    ^^^
    Try mini-Vs. Cheap, and a hell of a lot better than traditional cantilevers.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndrwSwitch View Post
    ^^^
    Try mini-Vs. Cheap, and a hell of a lot better than traditional cantilevers.
    Yeah, I actually already bought them, I just Havent installed them yet.I'd still prefer disks though.
    '13 Salsa Horsethief 2
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    '11 Ridley X-Ride

  17. #17
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    LOL, discs are nice, and with a welding kit, some finesse and an industrial oven, all things are possible.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  18. #18
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    Last summer I was looking for a road bike. Plan was to have one for occasional triathlons and ride mid week when I did not have time to do a proper mtn bike ride. After much looking and and with a limited budget I picked up a used Trek 5200 from a local guy in MTBR. That bike is carbon with Ultregra group triple with 9 speed rear for$500. Since then I have put 1600 miles on the bike and it has worke great. I went through one rear tire and the front has never been changed. Fit is good, but I might have been better on an 54 instead of the 52 I have. Not really sure though as 54 could have been a tad big. I swapped the 90 mm stem to a 110 and this seems to work. The riding position is different from the mtn bike and the fit needs to be different. Much more forward centered on the road bike. I need my hips farther forward to make good power in the drops. Anyway I have really happy with it as I much better on the road than the mtn bike. I mostly do short 20 mile road rides, but have done the occasional 40-60 mile road ride as well.
    Joe
    2003 KHS Alite 4000 26" Hardtail - XC, All mountain, blah blah blah.. I just ride.

  19. #19
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    When I got my Trek 1.5 road bike cheap in the sales the first thing I noticed was how poor the rim brakes were compared to my MTB's discs. The next was road bikes have to be finely adjusted to fit you well or they can really beat you up if you ride hard or for hours at a time. Now mine has had new brakes, new saddle I can ride it for hours with no problems.

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