1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
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2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #1
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    Easy to upgrade a Raleigh Avenger?

    I just bought a used Raleigh Avenger. I've been wanting to get into mountain biking for a while and it seemed like a good entry level bike. It shifts gears a little clunky and I would like to get some disc breaks. How easy is it to upgrade this bike, I'd like to get new gears and breaks?
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  2. #2
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    You would need new wheels and a new fork if you wanted to move to disc. Rock the bike until it brakes, then upgrade the bike. As far as the chunkyness, you should be able to just make a few minor adjustments and possibly new cables and housing.

  3. #3
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    thanks for the info. I do have one more question for you, I realize this bike isn't working putting a lot of money into but if I can buy some components for a few hundred bucks what do you recommend?

  4. #4
    beautiful jackass
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    That bike is not worth a few hundred bucks. Ride it and spend time learning about biking. Open a savings account and put that few hundred bucks into it. By the time the Raleigh breaks you will have enough money for a nice new bike with all the nice parts you're looking for. You'll have learned enough about biking by then to make an educated purchase.

    I recommend saving your money until you have around $500.00. At that point you will have enough to go to your local bike shop and buy something like this Specialized Hardrock with disc brakes

    P.S. If your current bike is not smoothly shifting gears, the problem can most likely be worked out with a little tuning. Do a Google search for rear derailleur tuning and you will find out how to get it smooth.
    Last edited by one incredible donkey; 06-04-2008 at 06:52 AM.

  5. #5
    Cheezy Rider
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    Quote Originally Posted by one incredible donkey

    I recommend saving your money until you have around $500.00. At that point you will have enough to go to your local bike shop and buy something like this Specialized Hardrock with disc brakes

    P.S. If your current bike is not smoothly shifting gears, the problem can most likely be worked out with a little tuning. Do a Google search for rear derailleur tuning and you will find out how to get it smooth.
    I agree. You could spend $500 on upgrades and the bike still wouldn't be as good as the Hardrock. Tune the shifting, ride it, and save your money for a hardtail with discs.

    Looking at the picture, it appears that your seat post is almost touching the rear shock. That can't be good, you should raise it or cut it. That suggests that maybe this bike is a bit big for you, another reason not to invest too much in it.

  6. #6
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    I'm going to take all of your advice and put my cash away for the Davinci Hucker I've always wanted. Regarding the seat I haven't adjusted it and will try and fit it when I get home

    I would like to replace the tires and tubes just because the ones I have look old and am not exaclty sure what tire and tube size I need to get?

    All of this leads me to the question Is this bike good enough for me to get started on riding trails?

  7. #7
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    Your tires should have the size printed on the side, odds are those are 26-inch tires, very common. They come in different widths, from 1.5 to 2.5 inches, and any width should fit your rim, although a 2.5 might not fit in your frame. 1.9 or 2.1 are the most common widths.

    I wouldn't hesitate to take it on trails, it's probably heavy but sturdy. I wouldn't go crazy on the jumps, but I would expect it could survive 2-foot drops.

    Make sure the brakes are adjusted properly, I would replace the cables and maybe the housing. If the brake pads are worn smooth (they should have some grooves on the face), then replace those too. You should be able to do this yourself, but if you don't want to learn a shop shouldn't charge much. If you have a shop do it, buy the cables/pads from them, after paying shipping you won't save anything by buying over the internet anyway.

  8. #8
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    thanks for all the input you guys have been extremely helpful! Bike goes in for a tune up as soon as I get back from Ottawa.

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