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  1. #1
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    Drop-offs at low speed onto a flat?

    I've watched the video's posted on this forum(even own the first one on dvd) I don't see anything explaining how to hit a drop-off from a stand still or at low speed. I've seen pics of guys dropping off park benches etc.and was wondering what type of pedaling/position to employ to pull this off.My best guess would be ratcheting the pedal so your strong leg is just forward of 12:00, then pump hard and throw your weight back?
    Does this sound right and are there any videos you know of out there?
    I've been practicing off my curb but that's only 6" and you really don't pay if you mess up

  2. #2
    Picture Unrelated
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    You sound like you're on the right track; maybe check out trials moves like pedal kicks if this is something you need to do regularly.

    Practice is a frame of mind; if you aren't assigning any negative feelings to not dropping the curb properly then you'll never learn. You have two options: mentally up your penalty for messing up the curb drop (be hard on yourself) or start finding new (more penalizing) obstacles to practice with. If you're in the right frame of mind you can put in a lot of practice even if you aren't replicating the exact circumstances that are giving you trouble.
    Don't you hate it when a sentence doesn't end the way you think it octopus?

  3. #3
    EDR
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    Re: Drop-offs at low speed onto a flat?

    Wheelie drop. The only way I know how to drop from slow or no speed. Start with curbs,.. then find drops of increasing heights working your way up to two then three feet.

  4. #4
    dru
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    Yes, wheelie drops. The only way to do them is to be brave and keep pedaling as you go off the edge and DON'T STOP PEDALING until the back wheel clears the edge. If you don't you'll land on your face. When I was younger I could wheelie drop off a picnic table, but old age and being away from the sport for a while has made me chicken these days.

    Drew
    occasional cyclist

  5. #5
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    Start small and work your way up, that move can potentially be very hazardous.

    Bicycle Off The Back Of A Truck Stunt FAIL !!!!!! - YouTube

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    Start small and work your way up, that move can potentially be very hazardous.

    Bicycle Off The Back Of A Truck Stunt FAIL !!!!!! - YouTube
    Hahaha! I was going to post something like that, but you beat me to it

    Definitely start small and work your way up. Even practicing wheelies and practicing getting your front wheel up and balancing on your rear wheel while not rolling will help with low speed drop-offs. If you can keep your front wheel up long enough to begin the "drop off", you'll be set. Once you get that balance down, work on your bravery. Start with curbs, move on to rolling off bigger curbs, picnic tables, truck beds, the roof of your house, moving semi trucks, the possibilities of things to ride a bike off of are nearly endless
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  7. #7
    FKA Malibu412
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    Also start with drops you can roll onto so that you're carrying a little bit of momentum then slow your speed as you get comfortable with how to handle the bike as you clear the lip, fall, and land properly. Eventually you'll be doing wheelie drops standing still from that same drop.
    Everything that kills me, makes me feel alive

  8. #8
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    Thanks guys,I guess I'm on the right track.I go into a wheelie as the front tire approaches the edge then force myself to pedal through it as this doesn't feel natural.I try to nail the landings level or with the front slightly up.My next concern would be getting the front up too high on bigger drops.I'll be looking to go a "little" bigger and work my way up.

  9. #9
    dru
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    My next concern would be getting the front up too high on bigger drops.
    This is actually what you want, at least for landing to flat. You need to take the hit with your legs and then transfer the weight to the front.

    As for pedaling as you go off, yes it feels really weird, but you NEED TO DO THIS, until the back wheel clears the edge.

    Some how as you are falling your feet will end up level for the landing, although I don't know why this happens.

    Drew
    occasional cyclist

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by dru View Post
    This is actually what you want, at least for landing to flat. You need to take the hit with your legs and then transfer the weight to the front.

    As for pedaling as you go off, yes it feels really weird, but you NEED TO DO THIS, until the back wheel clears the edge.

    Some how as you are falling your feet will end up level for the landing, although I don't know why this happens.

    Drew
    Got it. Thanks!!

  11. #11
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    Make sure your drivetrain is working well - nothing worse then getting getting a little chain-skip when doing a wheelie drop. Great way to get way too familiar with your stem and bars.

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