1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
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  1. #1
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    Drop-offs + Hardtail = Flat Tire?

    I just started riding about a month or two ago. I have been riding a lot though so the experience is coming fast. I do have one question though. I found a pretty sweet drop-off to ride off of, it's about 3.5 feet tall and I finally got enough guts to go off. It was so much fun that I went off again and again. Then the next day I noticed that my back tire would loose air pressure and be flat about every 3 or 4 hours of sitting. My bike is a hardtail and I had my back tire pressure at around 60-65 psi when I was riding off this drop off, also, I weigh only about 145 pounds.

    So basically I just was wondering what went wrong. From the forums I can see that most people keep their psi around 45 psi or so. Did I just have my tire too full, not full enough, is this too big of a drop-off for a hardtail. Also, am I just landing too hard? Is there a technique to landing to make it easier on your back tire? I would love to be able to continue hitting this drop-off so any ideas/suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

    PS - If a 3.5 foot drop off is not too large for a hardtail, then what would be?

  2. #2
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    Reputation: snaky69's Avatar
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    I can do 6 foot to flat concrete without flatting on a hardtail, you just have to have technique. Was your landing sloped or flat? If it was sloped, try landing both tires at once, absorb as much energy from the impact as you can by bending your knees and generally crouching on the bike(I can't explain it much better) and let the fork soak up whatever's left, IMO you should not be using full travel on a 3.5 foot drop to a nice transition. If the landing was flat, then you should land rear wheel first, try watching a few trials vids to see how it's done.

    Drops aren't too bad on tires, missed 180's and general mayem on the streets/skatepark are another story...

    What type of flat was it? Pin hole? Snake bite? Pinch flat?

  3. #3
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    It's a flat dirt landing and i think i've probably just been landing on both tires at the same time, but would that really kill my back tire? Anyways, I think probably what killed it was landing without soaking it up with my knees. I didn't check on what kind of flat.

  4. #4
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    If it's taking that long to loose air, you probably just ran over a thorn on your way out of the woods. First thing to do is to check what kind of a puncture you have, then people will be able to tell you more.

    As for style, make sure you drop your seat before hitting the drop, you will find you have an extra couple inches of suspension in your legs and your rear wheel isn't taking such an abrupt stop.

    How big can you go on a hardtail? Well, the dirt jumps near me regularly have kids throwning 10 feet over lips across 30 foot gaps. It's all about the landing.
    I call for a mandate to allow only road bikes on trails to limit our speeds and increase our line picking skills-FB

  5. #5
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    I have been able to pull off drops close to 6 feet on a hardtail- make sure that you are running a high pressure on the tires, or else you will certainly run the risk of pinching the tubes- resulting in a speedy deflation.

    The bottom line is, (as the posters above me said) if the frame is of good quality, and you have the proper technique, it is possible to pull off a 3.5 feet drop on a hardtail.
    "Winners never quit. Quitters never win. But those who never win and never quit are idiots."

  6. #6
    pronounced may-duh
    Reputation: Maida7's Avatar
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    I doubt the drop has anything to do with the flat. Like others have said it could be a thorn or glass or even a bad valve. Just fix your flat and keep on having fun.

  7. #7
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    AWESOME!! Thanks guys!! Looks like I can just keep on having fun (and try to dampen my landings with my knees a little if anything). I'll make sure if I get any more flats to pay attention to the kind of flat.

  8. #8
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    In the meantime if slow flats are a regular occurrence (ie from thorns) put some slime into you tubes, you won't have to worry about fixing flats after every ride then. Where I live there is a shitload of them so slime is a must.
    [SIZE="2"]Life's a bi&*h & then you Ride![/SIZE]

  9. #9
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    I have a Ht but why does everyone praise them so mcuh, obviously you ca only take big hits on FS rigs..

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by taikuodo
    I have a Ht but why does everyone praise them so mcuh, obviously you ca only take big hits on FS rigs..
    I beg to differ, taking a drop on a big full on dh/fr rig takes a lot less skill and smoothness than on a hardtail. Just watch some bmx street videos, those guys do crazy drops fully rigid better than any DH/FR guy could dream of.

    It's not the bike, it's the rider.

  11. #11
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    Theres not a single video on the internet of a hardtail doing a 20 footer iirc. (im prob wrong tho)

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by taikuodo
    Theres not a single video on the internet of a hardtail doing a 20 footer iirc. (im prob wrong tho)
    Highest drop done a hardtail was 34 feet, there is a video on the internet floating somewhere.


    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hZLrNlnHJTA

    Here's a 30 footer, couldn't find the video I was talking about.

  13. #13
    All Mountain Rider
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    Quote Originally Posted by snaky69
    It's not the bike, it's the rider.
    Agreed totally!

    Just keep loss on the bike and adsorb the drop with your body. All of what is mentioned above.

    Also I recommend cleaning the inside of the tire and rim well before you put a new tube in. you be surprised at what can get in there.

    I have taken 5 foot drops with a Fully rigid (no shocks) Huffy! (old steal frame with good rims ) So its not the bike. Was 230 lbs back then

    good luck
    Donít matter how many mm of travel, If your a 26 or 29. or if its SRAM or Shimano

    We all ride. Why can't we all get along?

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