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  1. #1
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    Reputation: Hotrodvw's Avatar
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    Dreaming of a new gearing gig

    The more I ride, the more I think a 1x9 or similar would be great. I'm all about fewer moving parts, quieter drivetrain, less weight and less maintenance.......not to mention a more simplistic gearing selection. I don't use all of my gears anyways, so why not? I run the small chain ring 80% of the time, and some middle chain ring. Out back I'm running 4-7 on an 8 ring casette. Thoughts on this? I'm just kicking it around, may switch it up over the winter. Anyone have a 'rough' idea on cost?

  2. #2
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    Reputation: jeffj's Avatar
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    Why don't you try 2x8 first. It doesn't lose much weight, but it is considerably easier to adjust a front derailleur to work well for two chainrings than for three, it gives you increased chainring clearance if you ride where you might need that, and it makes gearing choices less complex.

    You can find a bashguard to replace your big chainring for around $20 to $40.

    For me, I would also want to increase the size of the (formerly) middle chainring from 32t to 36t. Also, would want to go to an 11-34 cassette (which Shimano just started making again) to increase the range.

    The cost to do all of the suggested changes (plus applicable taxes and shipping):

    bashguard: $20 to $40

    36t chainring: $25 to $50

    8 speed cassette @ 11-34t: $20

    So, it could be done for (well) under $100 if you shop carefully.

    ===========

    If you really want to go 1x9 (instead of 1x8), you're going to spend more money (somewhere between $100 to $150 if you shop carefully, and could easily go higher). The physical spacing between rear cogs is different on 9 speed than it is for 8 speed, so you'll need a new front shifter (and I'd replace the cable and housing while I was at it), 9 speed cassette, and 9 speed chain at a minimum, and then, many (if not most) that go 1x9 usually go with a slightly smaller (than 32t) 30t chainring. But since you use you small chainring "80%" of the time, this seems like it could be a problem. And I would have a hard time recommending someone go 1x with only a 22t chainring unless they were in true billy-goat terrain 95% of the time or you really don't mind only having a very low gearing range.

    JMHO.

  3. #3
    Fat-tired Roadie
    Reputation: AndrwSwitch's Avatar
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    I'm used to thinking of single-ring setups as being something for people who don't use their granny rings. And so are the parts manufacturers. Single-ring cranks for mountain bikes are most typically 104 BCD cranks, giving a minimum 32t gear, or 30t if you get something a little expensive and a little uncommon and maybe attack your crank spider with a milling tool.

    I find your terminology a little confusing. When you say you run 4-7 - do you mean you run the higher gears, that are physically smaller cogs, or the lower ones? (As in, which side are you counting from?) I ask because there's a lot of redundancy in a mountain bike drivetrain, and if you're using those higher ratio cogs with the small chain ring, you can probably get the same gear ratios from lower ratio cogs and the middle chain ring, and just do the more common single-ring setup.

    Anyway, if you do use the granny ring most of the time and you're not using redundant gear ratios, I mostly second jeffj's post. But, I don't know if I'd bother with the 36t chain ring - you're not using your 32t ring much as it is, and the 36 is so that people don't give up so many gear ratios when they get rid of their 44.

    Another option is the Widgit. It's way too expensive for what it is, $140, but can give you as low as a 28t single ring - good if 32t is too high for you riding 1x.

    The Widgit - Single Chainring for MTB and Road bikes

    The cheapest possible version of a single ring modification is about $30. This would only work if you decide that you're content with your 32t ring only, which would be if you're using the harder cogs only on your cassette. Get the 104 BCD and 64 BCD bash guards for a 32t chain ring from this guy and put one on each side.

    Products

    You can also do an outer bash guard and an inner chain drop device, but shipping would probably drive the price a little bit higher.

    A little rambly. I woke up because I was hungry.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  4. #4
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    Yes, personally this kind of gearing sounds great but you have to decent amount of money to do it... :/

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndrwSwitch View Post
    I find your terminology a little confusing. When you say you run 4-7 - do you mean you run the higher gears, that are physically smaller cogs, or the lower ones? (As in, which side are you counting from?) I ask because there's a lot of redundancy in a mountain bike drivetrain, and if you're using those higher ratio cogs with the small chain ring, you can probably get the same gear ratios from lower ratio cogs and the middle chain ring, and just do the more common single-ring setup.
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  6. #6
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    If you're mostly on the 22, 1x9 (or 1x8) is probably not for you. You can run the gears you use most often through a calculator and figure out what the comparable gears would be with a different front ring, but my guess is you'd need a 1xwhatever setup with something like a 26 or 28 up front.

    Here's a good calculator to play with: Sheldon Brown's Bicycle Gear Calculator

  7. #7
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    there are a lot of good options out there 1x9 1x6 even 1x3 but each requires an effort to make it work.

    A 1x9 requires at least a chain guide of some kind whether it be like the e13 single or a bashguard and a inner keeper device.

    The 1x6 or 1x3 options are designed around fitting a minimal cog set on a singlespeed cassette wheel to get the more equal spoke length so a stronger wheel.

    My best recommendation is to buy a singlespeed conversion kit (a tensioner, gear and a new chain). Try out singlespeed for awhile. You might realize that you don't need a small chainring to make it up your trails plus you can build some strength. Then you might want to go back to looking at the 1x8 setup.
    Try this: HTFU

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