1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
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2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #1
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    Dr. says I need to be walking, but I'd rather be riding!

    My cardiologist says I need to be walking 12 miles a week but I'm of the opinion riding would be more fun. I've logged 34 miles since last Sunday and picked up a new bike for me on Friday. I've been doing 6.5 miles in 1/2 hr on hilly roads the past few days. Not much I know but I gotta start somewhere. It's been some 30 years or so since I parked my old ten speed.

    The new ride is a stock Giant Revel 1 29er.

  2. #2
    Rogue Exterminator
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    Yup, riding is much more fun.
    Just stick it in granny and start grinding.

  3. #3
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    I'm sure your cardiologist would be fine with bikes, it's a good thing.

    I would mention that your bike setup looks strange. Saddle very low and bars very high. I would look into that. It is much more typical to have the bars within a couple inches of each other.
    Don't you hate it when a sentence doesn't end the way you think it octopus?

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by zebrahum View Post
    I'm sure your cardiologist would be fine with bikes, it's a good thing.

    I would mention that your bike setup looks strange. Saddle very low and bars very high. I would look into that. It is much more typical to have the bars within a couple inches of each other.
    Maybe he's doin' trials.
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  5. #5
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    With a 27" inseam he set the seat low so I could reach the pedals.

  6. #6
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    I prefer riding than walking also. Sure it could be a little bit more dangerous but I find it to be more exciting which is my motivation to exercise.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by NABodie View Post
    With a 27" inseam he set the seat low so I could reach the pedals.
    Reach the pedals or reach the ground? I hate to keep pressing the issue but I don't think I could comfortably operate a bike set up like that. Not to suggest that no one could, simply that I would not be comfortable.

    At any rate, I would consider lowering the handlebars in the stack, perhaps flipping the stem to bring a more balanced riding position. With such a large discrepancy between the bars and saddle you may find yourself having difficulty washing out in turns because you are unable to put any weight on the front wheel.

    Then again, without seeing a shot of you on the bike, it is difficult to make any determination and maybe it's just a trick of the camera angle.

    No matter, welcome to the forum and welcome to bikes!
    Don't you hate it when a sentence doesn't end the way you think it octopus?

  8. #8
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    About half way through my ride this morning I started getting some posterior discomfort and remembered the conversation here. I stopped for a moment, raised the seat about half an inch and petaled on. Felt much better.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by NABodie View Post
    About half way through my ride this morning I started getting some posterior discomfort and remembered the conversation here. I stopped for a moment, raised the seat about half an inch and petaled on. Felt much better.
    That's because when your bars are high compared to your saddle your pelvis rotates and you end up sitting more on the fleshy parts of your bottom. It's why cruiser bikes have enormous saddles on them and why you can't ride them for long without numbness.

    Your saddle height should be set for pedaling not for reaching the ground. I'll bet you need to come up higher still. A quick check is to sit on your bike, put your heel on the pedal then pedal around so your heel is at the bottom of the pedal stroke. If your saddle height is set properly then your knee should be almost fully extended. From here you can make some adjustments but that should get you close.

    Now, you can move your saddle up and down depending on the terrain you're encountering and your comfort level, but for proper pedaling (so you don't hurt your knees) your saddle should be pretty high. This does mean you won't be able to touch the ground from the saddle, but that's normal. If you see a section coming up that worries you, put your saddle down. Once you're through, put it back up. Eventually you'll move it less and less. Dropper seatposts are very popular because it means you don't have to get off the bike to change the saddle.
    Don't you hate it when a sentence doesn't end the way you think it octopus?

  10. #10
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    Zebrahum I think you may be correct about raising it a bit further. I'm planning on looking at it this evening as well as checking if the seat position is forward enough as well.

  11. #11
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    Zebrahum is definitely correct. The only time I'd have my seat that low is if I'm raging downhill and I want it out of the way (i.e. I'm not sitting on it).

  12. #12
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    Needs pic with you on the bike. The only way that fits you correctly is if you're three feet tall.

    Also, take the reflectors off the wheels. If/when they come loose and move you won't be a happy camper regardless of your seat height.
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  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by NABodie View Post
    My cardiologist says I need to be walking 12 miles a week but I'm of the opinion riding would be more fun. I've logged 34 miles since last Sunday and picked up a new bike for me on Friday. I've been doing 6.5 miles in 1/2 hr on hilly roads the past few days. Not much I know but I gotta start somewhere. It's been some 30 years or so since I parked my old ten speed.

    The new ride is a stock Giant Revel 1 29er.
    Riding is more fun indeed and even better cardio than walking!

  14. #14
    Now, THAT'S gonna hurt!
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    Regarding bike fit, from the looks of that pic, something is definitely askew. I would just recommend searching Youtube for proper mtb fit. There's tons of solid info that will get you familiar with where you should be on the issue.

    As for your cardio, good for you for getting started. I hate walking and enjoy riding immensely more. I can blow off going on a long walk but I actually welcome a ride and I'm doing it just about every day. I'm sort of in a similar situation as you in that I needed to get off my ass but mine was brought about by cervical spine fusion where the problem caused severe muscle mass loss in my legs. One thing I have done that has helped me a great deal at 51 years old was buy a watch/heart rate monitor with HRM strap(Timex fitness HRM ($100). Instead of being out there blowing up my lungs and wearing myself out, I'm working in my specific heart rate zones as depicted by the monitor. My endurance has improved hugely and I'm finding that I have that quick burst energy that is necessary when I need it as compared to getting nowhere fast when I was always pushing so hard on the trail everyday and just beating myself up.

    I'm getting so much more out of this now that I ride almost everyday, usually alternating days between riding single track and then riding on rural roads for 20+ miles on alternate days on a hardtail mtb that I built/set up for the street without the gnarly tires.

    Good luck and stick with it! Just make sure you stick within the parameters that your Cardiologist suggests and have fun with it!

  15. #15
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    At #5 the OP states they have a 27" inseam.

    There are several formula to calculate seat height.
    Using the 109% as an example. from here

    for a 27" inseam seat height would be (excuse me i am a metric person)
    27" equals 68.6cm
    1.09 x 68.6 cm = 74.77cm = 29.4"

    measuring off the picture the saddle should be about the same as the tire diameter ie 29" above the pedal when it is in line with the seat tube, at it lowest position.

    Then in that picture the seat height is correct if not a little high.

    Too short for a 29er?
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  16. #16
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    OK so I worked with the seat position last night and took it back out this morning for a 10.7 mile trek. No sore buttocks today! The higher position worked much better, in fact I raised it a bit further half way through the ride. It sucks I can't reach the ground as easily but then that's not a new problem for me with things like this. So no I don't think I'm too short for the bike but just need to get the setup fine tuned.



    I looked at some youtube videos yesterday to set it up a little better.

    Walking or running for me just don't excite me in the least, but the bike ride is fun. I'll ride the bike so I am actually doing the exercise, and I enjoy it so I will keep at it. I've gone from 3.5 miles Sunday week ago to 10.7 miles this morning. The heart monitor watch is in my future but for the time being I'll just have to keep a manual check on it. I had my quad bypass surgery at the end of 2011 and I have made pretty much a total recovery. It put me on my butt for awhile but it's not going to keep me down. The Doc wants me walkin 12 miles a week but that wasn't happening. So far this week I've done 21 miles on the bike. 11 miles in the morning before work is a pretty good workout I think.

  17. #17
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    Now that looks much better.
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  18. #18
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    riding is much more fun.

  19. #19
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    Next step is to lower those bars. Move those spacers above the stem and your handling should improve with a better attack position.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by NABodie View Post
    ..snip.. It sucks I can't reach the ground as easily but then that's not a new problem for me with things like this....snip...
    Depending on which of my bikes I an riding I either can't touch the ground or only just touch the ground with the tip of my shoe. It is normal not to be able to touch the ground when you are sitting on the saddle.

    +1 on removing the spacers under the stem ( if you are 'flexible enough") I would remove them one at a time, not all at once.

    Keep up the riding

    The bike "set up" looks much better
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  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by mitzikatzi View Post
    +1 on removing the spacers under the stem ( if you are 'flexible enough") I would remove them one at a time, not all at once.
    Clarification for new rider: do not "remove" spacers, move them from under the stem to over the stem. and make sure you understand how to adjust a threadless headset before you do anything.
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  22. #22
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    Is your shop close to you? They should spend 10 minutes with you explaining and helping with fit. Do you feel comfortable with taking the wheels off, adjusting the brakes, correcting the headset spacers, etc? If not, they can help with that, too.
    Quote Originally Posted by Fuglio View Post
    You guys suck im all bummed now

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigSteve in CO View Post
    Is your shop close to you? They should spend 10 minutes with you explaining and helping with fit. Do you feel comfortable with taking the wheels off, adjusting the brakes, correcting the headset spacers, etc? If not, they can help with that, too.
    Yeah I wish they had done all this before I left with it.


    I'll swap the spacers as soon as I can fill the hole in my allen wrench set! All of em are there but one, ain't that the way!

  24. #24
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    Ok so I moved all but one of the smaller spacers to the top and the bike does seem to handle better. Should I move the last one up top? Will it hurt anything not to have one down under?

    Now Big Steve said something about adjusting the brakes. What needs to be done with them? Anything else you guys think needs doing?

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