1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #1
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    Dr. Says I need to get out, Diamond Back 2014 Recoil or Daws Roandgouse 2750.

    Looking for a beginner budget FS bike, mostly trail riding with some hills. Dr says I need to get out and start moving, I'm 5'6" 265.

    2 bikes that are in my range ar a Diamond back 2014 Recoil with 29" wheels. Closeout on amazon right now for $525 and being a prime member free 2 day shipping.
    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00...pf_rd_i=507846

    Or the BikeDirects Dawes Roundhouse 2750. with 27.5 wheels.
    Save up to 60% off new 650b and 27.5 Mountain Bikes - MTB - Dawes 29 SS Full Suspension new 650b and 27.5 Mountain Bikes

    Don't know much about the components compare to each other.

  2. #2
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    where do you plan to ride this bike? neighborhood streets, easy bike paths, rowdy and rocky mountain bike trails, open roads? is this just for exercise or are you planning to make a "serious" hobby out of cycling?

    Recoil suspension is horrible. Don't waste your time. I fact, anything in that price range that is full suspension is a joke. cheap, poorly designed frames with multiple moving parts tend to wear out quickly, especially with a heavier rider such as yourself. Is there any reason you think you need a full suspension bike? If not, a hardtail would be a much better value. Fewer parts to wear out or break.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by gottria View Post
    Looking for a beginner budget FS bike, mostly trail riding with some hills. Dr says I need to get out and start moving, I'm 5'6" 265.

    2 bikes that are in my range ar a Diamond back 2014 Recoil with 29" wheels. Closeout on amazon right now for $525 and being a prime member free 2 day shipping.
    Amazon.com : Diamondback Bicycles 2014 Recoil Full Suspension Mountain Bike (29-Inch Wheels), 16-Inch, White : Dual Suspension Mountain Bicycles : Sports & Outdoors

    Or the BikeDirects Dawes Roundhouse 2750. with 27.5 wheels.
    Save up to 60% off new 650b and 27.5 Mountain Bikes - MTB - Dawes 29 SS Full Suspension new 650b and 27.5 Mountain Bikes

    Don't know much about the components compare to each other.
    What's your budget and how often do you plan on riding? What are you really looking to get out from this hobby? Just exercise?

  4. #4
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    Riding mostly open trails nothing complicated. Don't plan on making this a serious hobby, with 2 kids playing competitive sports my weekends are limited, and my wallet. My last MTB is a 15 year old Diamond bike hard tail that needs a lot of work and may not be worth it.

    Recoil suspension, is that the rear shock type? Or they way the rear suspension pivots?

  5. #5
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    For sub 1,000 pricing and new, you want a hard tail. Avoid low-dollar FS bikes... there's a reason they're cheap.

    Do you have a local craigslist? That's probably the best bang for your buck. Post up here, maybe we can find something.
    2012 Specialized Camber Comp
    2014 Kona Taro
    2014 Giant Trance 27.5 1

  6. #6
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    he's talking about the bike model, the Recoil. cheap suspension is NEVER worth it. You'll get a better bike for the price if it does not have rear suspension. It's a very basic single pivot, but a single pivot needs a good shock on it to perform well, which that one does NOT have.

    Spend the same amount on a hardtail, and you are likely to get better drivetrain components and possibly a better suspension fork.

    And for the money, the DB is a better deal, anyway.

  7. #7
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    What kind of shape is your old bike in? ie what kind of work do you think would need to be done to it?

    If you're not sure you'd have time to ride, I'm not sure it'd be good to make a significant investment in a new bike.

    I know people have posted good results in losing weight by riding a bike.

    But personally I still prefer running if your body/knees can take it. I tried/thought about incorporating the bike into my workout. But my time is limited as well and I find maintaining the intensity level while running is easier than on the bike. ie when running, you're always working even though it might be easier when you go down hills.

    But with a bike it's too easy for me to coast and don't get as good of a workout. And I don't have the patience to pedal at a gear where you have to pedal more because of less resistance.

    So to get a decent workout on a bike I figure that I'd have to spend a lot longer on a bike than I would if I was running.

    But that's just my opinion and I'm sure there are differing opinions on this. The most important thing is for you to find something that you'll enjoy doing. So if you think you'd enjoy biking more and it will get you out of the house and moving, then go for it. But I kind of question if you really need a full suspension bike as well.

  8. #8
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    Cool-blue Rhythm

    I lost 27 pounds, The bike helped but the weight loss was simple, I stopped
    eating fast food and sodas plus I managed my portions.

    I can stand at attention, look straight down and see my,,,, Feet !
    now that's a good feeling I tell ya,,,
    Loosing the gut made me feel much much better.

    Go to your local bike shop or ask people who ride where you want to ride...

    A few extra hundred on a decent bike will make you want to ride it more..
    A Hard Tail makes you want to get out and stay out of the saddle more,
    that's a good thing for getting into better shape..

    Just sayin.


    5'6" an 265 stones,, Your really muscular or dangerously fat.

    Yeah a good hard tail will work you better.
    If you get our addiction a full squish can be your next bike,, say,,
    when you break under 200 pounds..

  9. #9
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    Don't even bother getting a full suspension bike at that price point; the suspension will be terrible. Get a hardtail and for the same price you will get a nicer fork and better components overall.

  10. #10
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    I know this is MTBR, but...

    I was very heavy when I first started riding. I know there are a couple of factors that will correlate with whether and how much you will ride your bike and whether you'll ride enough to make it a habit.

    The first and most important is whether the bike fits you properly. Go to a bike shop and have someone help you find the proper fit. If it fits (and if you like the color), you are golden and that will go a looong way toward providing a foundation for a cycling habit.

    Second one is this: simplicity and ease of use. I would recommend a hardtail for you first starting off. Here's why: You can get more bike for your buck. The components will be better and the bike will most likely function better. Plus, you can ride it on pavement.

    While the idea of "mountain biking" may seem attractive at the outset, it's not as easy as it appears or as others here might tell you it will be. Therefore, you may want to devote several months to just getting on your bike and riding it for a half-hour to an hour several times each week without fail. This probably means you'll be riding on pavement, unless you have some very conveniently located trails near your home.

    Building your fitness up first will help you immensely when you finally decide to ride your bike off of pavement.

    Bottom line? Buy a bike that fits you, spend as much as you can reasonably afford on your first bike, ride it as much as you can (yes, you can find the time to do so), build up your fitness, learn basic bike skills in the process, learn to have fun while riding (the best way of doing this is not thinking of each ride as "exercise"), and eventually take your bike off road to learn skills and increase the fun--and the bloodshed.

    If you successfully develop a riding habit (you will know whether this is going to happen within the first four weeks of purchasing your bike), squirrel away as much money as you can so you can graduate to a better bike in a couple of years.

    More than anything, though, don't forget to have fun.

    Bicycling literally saved my life! Had I not taken it up, I'd more than likely be dead by now. I would be thrilled if others could and would have the same experience as me (and I know they can). I rejoice with each added day I'm alive and with every ride I take.

    I don't say this halfheartedly when I wish you all the luck and success in the world.

    Best wishes for a long and happy bicycling romance!
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  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Osco View Post
    I lost 27 pounds, The bike helped but the weight loss was simple, I stopped
    eating fast food and sodas plus I managed my portions.

    I can stand at attention, look straight down and see my,,,, Feet !
    now that's a good feeling I tell ya,,,
    Loosing the gut made me feel much much better.

    Go to your local bike shop or ask people who ride where you want to ride...

    A few extra hundred on a decent bike will make you want to ride it more..
    A Hard Tail makes you want to get out and stay out of the saddle more,
    that's a good thing for getting into better shape..

    Just sayin.


    5'6" an 265 stones,, Your really muscular or dangerously fat.

    Yeah a good hard tail will work you better.
    If you get our addiction a full squish can be your next bike,, say,,
    when you break under 200 pounds..
    Wow, thanks for all the feedback. Yes, I am dangerously fat, that is why I'm here. Don't like running, to much on the knees. Always like riding Lake Chabot area.

    LBS had a Giant Talon 27.5 3. and a Raleigh hardtail Tokul 2. Raleigh felt the best and had hydrolic brakes vs cables on the Giant, but $100 more at $749.

  12. #12
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    I was 285 15 years ago. I'm 5'6. I graduated high school at that weight and started riding to get it off. I haven't stopped riding and when my weight hovers near 190 I get more aggressive about riding for a few months and get back down to 170 or so. It's a constant battle, between my job and some injuries it's hard to push yourself, but you've got to do something.

    As for bikes I don't think you need a high dollar bike, and hydraulic brakes are just more complication to achieve the same goal. If you planned on riding more aggressively that would be one thing but since you're not i would try to keep it simple and cheap. If you do find that you like the sport and its something you could see yourself benefiting from a better bike, then dump the money. By then you'll know what you're buying and what your style is. I hate seeing people drop money on bikes and then it's just not the right bike for them. Pretty much all lbs bikes will have the same or similar specs at their given price points give or take, so I would look more at comfort and budget than specific models and brands. As for bikes direct, my friend just got the gravity g1 27.5 and he's very happy with it. It will get a fork upgrade next season but we also ride really technical trails. For the money it's a solid bike.

  13. #13
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    I just looked up Lake Chabot and it looks like it's in the San Francisco bay area and actually closer to Oakland.

    I'm not familiar with that area but would imagine that there is a pretty big bike community there and craigslist is used pretty widely there.

    You know based on the stereotype,which maybe off base, of some areas of California being more health conscious then other areas and I think Craigslist started in the SF area.

    So as others have suggested, check out some of the used offerings in your area if you're comfortable with going used. There are some advantages with going new, such as shop support so you don't have to spend much time tinkering with your bike and you can get a bike immediately instead of waiting for the right bike to come up. Not sure how big of a factor cost is for you, but going used will help reduce the cost to get out riding.

    For example I'm not sure how far this is from you and what size bike you should get at 5'6 but here is a small Talon(might be different then the on you checked out at the lbs) in Modesto:
    Giant Talon 27.5 Small

    I'd guess that you might be a medium though. But this is just an example of what's out there. As the other person mentioned, you can post what you find here and people can give you their opinions or help suggest a bike for you.

    Also I'm still wondering if your old bike can suit your purposes, at the very least to use it to get back into bike shape and help you determine what you want in your next bike. Then when you're ready can spend a little bit in a nicer bike. I think there have been others that have posted pictures on their bikes on here for suggestions on what needs to be done for their bike. I would maybe consider fixing up the old bike if it could be done for maybe less than $100 and I'm actually wondering if it'd be a lot less. But if the bike is a lower end bike that was $100 new to start off with can see how it might not be worth fixing up. And as others said, a nicer bike might motivate you to get out and ride more.

  14. #14
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    A chain some lube in the cables and brake pads would be the bare minimum if it's sat for a long time most likely. Post some pics of it and tell us what wrong and we can steer you in the right direction if you wanna go that route.

  15. #15
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    Cool-blue Rhythm

    Hydro, 'wet' brakes are worth every penny.
    Much more power and feel when you need it most.

    Cable disk brakes do ok, but Is ok good enough, after you popped over that
    steep drop by mistake and need the perfect amount of drag brake front and
    rear or you will skid and damage the trail or go over the bars,,,

    Rim brakes suck when sand is a factor, that's more than half the time off road.
    Rim brakes really suck when wet.

    Just saying :P

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by nmum View Post
    ...here is a small Talon(might be different then the on you checked out at the lbs) in Modesto:
    Giant Talon 27.5 Small
    Man that is a sweet bike. Been looking (north bay only) for an upgrade for my kid(s) and that is legit.

    Quote Originally Posted by Osco View Post
    Hydro, 'wet' brakes are worth every penny.
    Cable disk brakes do ok, but Is ok good enough
    Rim brakes suck
    Totally on board here. My kids' bikes have cable disks and rim, and they are pretty awful.

    I'd put hydro brakes on the must-have list. 26/27.5/29 who cares. You'll want something with an air shock though - at your size you'll be too much for a coil.
    2012 Specialized Camber Comp
    2014 Kona Taro
    2014 Giant Trance 27.5 1

  17. #17
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    The 2015 Giant Talon 3 27.5 has hydraulic bikes. I know because I bought one about a month ago. It's a very sweet bike. My LBS sold it to me for $620 plus tax.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by ou2mame View Post
    A chain some lube in the cables and brake pads would be the bare minimum if it's sat for a long time most likely. Post some pics of it and tell us what wrong and we can steer you in the right direction if you wanna go that route.
    Well here are some pics of the old Diamondback, needs rims as they are bent, and tires. Not sure if it's worth it or not.
    Dr. Says I need to get out, Diamond Back 2014 Recoil or Daws Roandgouse 2750.-20141101_094106%5B1%5D.jpgDr. Says I need to get out, Diamond Back 2014 Recoil or Daws Roandgouse 2750.-20141101_094115%5B1%5D.jpg

    That Talon in Modesto is a sweet ride, just sent over a txt and see if he still has it.

  19. #19
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    Re: Dr. Says I need to get out, Diamond Back 2014 Recoil or Daws Roandgouse 2750.

    Quote Originally Posted by Osco View Post
    Hydro, 'wet' brakes are worth every penny.
    Much more power and feel when you need it most.

    Cable disk brakes do ok, but Is ok good enough, after you popped over that
    steep drop by mistake and need the perfect amount of drag brake front and
    rear or you will skid and damage the trail or go over the bars,,,

    Rim brakes suck when sand is a factor, that's more than half the time off road.
    Rim brakes really suck when wet.

    Just saying :P
    So for years we've all been in danger? Seriously? I've ridden hydraulic brakes and while the articulation is smoother, my bb7s have the same stopping power and gradual pressure. If you can only coast and stop with disc brakes you just don't know how to use your brakes. Cable brakes are perfectly acceptable, and in some cases better.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by nmum View Post
    For example I'm not sure how far this is from you and what size bike you should get at 5'6 but here is a small Talon(might be different then the on you checked out at the lbs) in Modesto:
    Giant Talon 27.5 Small
    .
    So the Talon is still available and I might drive out today and take a look. Thanks for the heads up.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by gottria View Post
    So the Talon is still available and I might drive out today and take a look. Thanks for the heads up.
    Found a few that look right. Meeting with the guy in Modesto tomorrow to take a look at it. Price seems right, bike got good reviews and upgraded to hydro brakes.

    specialized hard rock sport disc 29er

    specialized hard rock sport disc 29er

    FS: Gary Fisher Mountain Bike

    Specialized Rockhopper 29er

    2013 Specialized Rockhopper 29er Mtn Bike, Small 15.5 inch

  22. #22
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    Depending on how "bent" they are the wheels could be fixed .You could get a set of tires for under $50. There are some shops in Oakland and Berkeley with used bikes ,and the Recyclery in San Raphael that used parts.

  23. #23
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    Those all look pretty good. If you can stretch your budget another couple hundred (I know, I know) you can probably find something with an air fork instead of coil. The coil will probably be okay for very light riding, so you could conceivably upgrade later if you want/need to.
    2012 Specialized Camber Comp
    2014 Kona Taro
    2014 Giant Trance 27.5 1

  24. #24
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    Meeting with sell for the Giant Talon tomorrow, for $400 it gets me good starter bike that is more that I need at this point. Thanks for the advise guys.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by gottria View Post
    Dr says I need to get out and start moving, I'm 5'6" 265.
    Chances are, you'll never meet bigger bike advocate than me, but to be honest, unless you can ride EVERYDAY, in all weather, your progress will be super limited. I would start with something more basic.

    1. Sincerely evaluate your diet. If you're eating crap food, stop. You don't have to go kale and carrots, but make some changes. I'm stunned by the sh*t people eat.

    2. Buy a bathroom scale. Measure and track your weight. You can fool yourself, but the scale does not lie.

    3. Start walking. Get your a** out and walk for an hour everyday. Make the commitment, even in crap weather, to yourself. You can do it!

    Good Luck!

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