1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
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2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #1
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    Downhill and bunnyhopping

    Is it required to know bunnyhopping on fast downhill runs?

    I want to do downhills but I do not know how to do bunny hopping and want to learn the tricks.

  2. #2
    don't move for trees
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    yes and no. it isn't really necessary, but once you do learn to bunny hop you can improve your riding so much. On down hill runs you hop over rock gardens, rocks, roots, weird dirt, or any thing that might take your speed away, so it does eventually help to know how to hop
    "Get a bicycle.You will not regret it if you live." Mark Twain

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by BKnight
    yes and no. it isn't really necessary, but once you do learn to bunny hop you can improve your riding so much. On down hill runs you hop over rock gardens, rocks, roots, weird dirt, or any thing that might take your speed away, so it does eventually help to know how to hop
    plus it's just so much fun to hop over stuff when going dowhill. I can't really do proper bunnyhops (where you pull the front way up then sortof roll forward pulling up the back), but going downhill using clipless pedals (or a less so with platforms because I ride mostly with clipless) I can hop over a lot of stuff by just compressing the bike then hopping straight up pulling up both the front end and the pedals at once (the front end a little higher). I don't get much vertical, but going downhill it feels like you're getting big air. This does not take near as much skill as proper bunnyhopping though I'm still working on learning to bunnyhop the right way.

  4. #4
    don't move for trees
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    an easy way to learn the proper bunny hope technique is to stand over your top tube and pull back-lifting the front tire, then roll/push your handle bars forward making the back wheel come off the ground while the front is off. Its best if you have a bmx to try this on, cause if you don't have the clearance your going to nut your self. you can also stand to the side of the bike that works too. then when your riding do the same motion, but add in your weight to, shift backwards on the pull up, then throw it all forward
    "Get a bicycle.You will not regret it if you live." Mark Twain

  5. #5
    local trails rider
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    Depends.
    Trails might or might not have obstacles where bunnyhopping is the best way. Pretty often you can find a ground feature that you can use as a kicker for getting the wheels off the ground, though.

    One of my local trails has a fallen tree right in the middle of some rocks. A good rider could hop over it but my nerves are not allowing it yet. I suppose it is the rocks in the landing area that make me nervous. The rocks that are before the tree would work as a launch platform. I either stop, lift, and continue, or take the established optional line around that spot.

  6. #6
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    I find it hard to lift the bike, I am 5'4 and weighs around 55kg, the bike weighs around 17kg, it is Haro X6, is it possible for me to practice bunny hop on this bike?

  7. #7
    El Pollo Diablo
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    yep.

  8. #8
    local trails rider
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    Now, I am no authority on this but apparently hardtail bikes and full suspension take different timing to accomplish a hop.

    On a HT you "compress" the rear tyre to get a bit of extra bounce. Or that is at least one way to think about it. On a big FS bike you might want to try compressing the rear suspension and then bouncing on the rebound.

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