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  1. #1
    TimB
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    Done with hydro pack , how do you bring water

    I'm still a noob here, I ride a local cross country trail for about 1 1/2 hr on a normal ride. I was wearing a cheap back pack / hydration pack with my bike multi tool, snack bar etc, I am pretty much tired of carting all that on my back, riding a circle trail that I could hike out of if my bike breaks down or I fall and get much of a cut or such .
    So this brings me to the question, what' do you all take on a ride? Last ride I just left my water battle in my truck and drank when I was done riding. Then I thought about maybe a water bottle rack on the frame , then how do I carry multi tool, first aid pouch etc,,, maybe a small seat back pouch for tools. ,, what works for you all???

  2. #2
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    On a trail like walnut where I can walk 1 mile to the car no matter where I am, I have started carrying just a water bottle and the Multi in a pocket.

    Same goes for street rides <1:30

    Race Strap - MTB Saddle Mount

    Other than that, I race and ride with a camelback, and pay attention not to over fill it in races and only put the amount of hydration for the period of riding. I used 32 OZ for 1.5 hour races and get a bottle on the hand up.

    Here come the Fanny pack boys with their compromised solution which is still problematic...

  3. #3
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    Get a good camelbak or osprey, fitted well. Water bottle with gatorade or such on the bike. Seat bag with multitool, levers and inner tube. 100 oz reservoir for the camelbak, fill as needed. Where would you carry the bacon, sandwich and figs? Handsaw? Pump? Yup, fits right in there.

  4. #4
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    I use a Backcountry Research strap for tube, tire levers and multitool, a small saddle bag for things like zip ties, spare chain link and derrailure hanger. And a bottle cage for water and a minipump.

    But still carrying a Evoc backpack, wouldn't want to ride without back protection.

  5. #5
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    Like others have said, get a quality backpack (fit is important) and carry only what you need. I used to carry a tube with me all the time until I realized that I rarely got flats and when I did, I was no more than 40 mins walk from my car. Now I carry only water, phone, and identification. I leave all my tools and spares in the car. Experiment and find what combination works for you.

  6. #6
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    For my short rides I got one of these bags, plus saddle bag and a water bottle on my bike. This thing seems bulky but it really isn't fits my phone then a big pocket where you can fit a tube/cliff bar - I have it on two bikes - for the trail I like to be prepared even though I do mostly quick loops as well. (I'll be honest I dread the back pack)

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  7. #7
    Fat Is Where It's At Moderator
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    For rides less than 1:30 on familiar trails a bottle is just fine, for longer rides the pack tags along; this is what I do on weekday rides.

    On my weekday rides usually don't carry anything with me but for group rides, long rides or new to me trails always carry the essentials on the pack.

  8. #8
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    Nice - very hot topic.

    As touched on, where it's a short walk back home (or to car), you can put mini-bottles in the back of a racing shirt (pockets on back), and probably stuff a multi-tool in your pocket (or not even carry one if close enough).

    Alternatively, a bike with 2 bottles in the front triangle can be a bonus: one for water, second for "stuff".

    Or, if like me, you can whittle down your previously heavy pack to something you won't feel (except for water weight fluctuations):
    My Heavy Pack (Alternate Title: I'm Stupid)

  9. #9
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    I'm looking at the Dakine Low Rider 5L to keep all that stuff off my back..for longer rides you still probably want the hydro backpack though

  10. #10
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    While I don't love wearing my hydration pack, I do a lot better job of keeping up with my drinking if I'm wearing it vs. just using a bottle or 2 in the frame. Most of the time, I just have trouble finding spots to reach down and grab it. I use a seat bag for a tube/multitool/Co2. Warning on seat bags: I've had 2 fail and dump my stuff out on the trail. Luckliy, both times I was on an out and back and found my stuff laying in the trail.

  11. #11
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    I have a saddle bag on my hard-tail. I find it the perfect solution. It's got tools, a tube etc in it and I just grab the bike and go.

    A bottle cage works fine as long as the trail isn't too rough and fast or the bottle can get thrown out!

  12. #12
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    For short rides, I just put my stuff into my rear jersey pockets. I'll carry one large bottle on the bike.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Runfox View Post
    So this brings me to the question, what' do you all take on a ride?
    I hate packs too. I wear dorky jerseys because the rear pockets are super handy and hold my phone, pump, multi-tool and snack(s) for longer rides. Spare tube lives under my seat secured by an awesome strap and 2 bottles are good for up to 3 hours. I don't wear a pack on any ride these days and never miss having one.

    Seat packs are a good substitute for jersey pockets but just not as easy access.
    I brake for stinkbugs

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    I hate packs too. I wear dorky jerseys because the rear pockets are super handy and hold my phone, pump, multi-tool and snack(s) for longer rides. Spare tube lives under my seat secured by an awesome strap and 2 bottles are good for up to 3 hours. I don't wear a pack on any ride these days and never miss having one.

    Seat packs are a good substitute for jersey pockets but just not as easy access.
    You guys don't worry about falling on your multi tool w/your back? I get worried of putting heavy/metal stuff near my back. I have to admit one of the two I have is huge! - I always put them in the saddle bag.
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  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by jcd46 View Post
    You guys don't worry about falling on your multi tool w/your back? I get worried of putting heavy/metal stuff near my back. I have to admit one of the two I have is huge! - I always put them in the saddle bag.
    Neoprene sleeve & rounded corners.

    Done with hydro pack , how do you bring water-lezyne_blox_23_enhance100003.jpg

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by jcd46 View Post
    You guys don't worry about falling on your multi tool w/your back? I get worried of putting heavy/metal stuff near my back. I have to admit one of the two I have is huge! - I always put them in the saddle bag.
    The one I carry is a micro Park so it's pretty small. I don't worry so much about the back thing because I figure a sharp rock or stick would probably get me anyway. I throw it in the jersey because it's easy and handy in case anyone needs it but I could, and should stash it under my seat along with the tube because I pretty much never use it, same with the pump. Also it would save me from having to remember them.

    Thanks!
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  17. #17
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    ^^ Thanks for the replies guys. It always crosses my mind when someone says they carry it on their shirt pocket.

    Good point on the rock analogy though.
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  18. #18
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    I have a bottle cage on the frame - get one of the cheap aluminium ones and you can bend it to hold the bottle tight.

    A small pump mounted the same place as the bottle cage.

    A small (0.6l) saddle pack containing a tube, self adhesive patches, tyre lever, chain link, multitool with chain splitter, spare mech hanger, a yard of duct tape, tyre boot, a few zipties and a small folding pliers (to take the thorns out of my tubeless tyre if I ever need to fit the tube).

    Food goes in jersey pocket if I think I'll need it (unusual for a ~2 hour ride).

    Car key, phone & emergency money in shorts pocket.

    One bottle does me for a few hours (drink well before setting off). If I'm out longer then I'll take a sack with a water bladder in. This is for the UK, where we don't have deserts though!

  19. #19
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    Buy a pouch of dehydrated water. Comes in powder form. Easier to carry

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G891A using Tapatalk

  20. #20
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    Can only fit a small water bottle in the cage on my medium Marin, and have to use a side-loading cage even for that. The only other mount is on the bottom of the tube, inaccessible while riding and sure to get covered with mud.

    Tools, etc in saddlebag, but that bag is usually attached to the stem & handlebars because it rubs on the rear tire If I slam the seat.

  21. #21
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    While I'm new to the whole scene and don't even have a bike yet, I am an avid hiker and can say I love my Osprey Raptor 14 and plan on using it for my rides. This pack was actually designed for cycling use so it has some cool features.

  22. #22
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    1.5hr, I just take a .5L water bottle on the downtube, and wear a little $10 Totes fanny pack for my phone and keys.
    Rail trail or long mtb rides, I've got an Osprey Raptor 14 hydration pack, typically loaded with snacks, first aid, TP/trowel, multitool, pump, tire levers, sealant or tube, all kinds of crap. Have a larger fanny pack otw. Wanted something that'd hold a couple of bottles securely and some minimal gear for this summer, so ordered this:

    https://www.rei.com/product/880880/u...viti-waistpack

  23. #23
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    Dropper post - I use awesome strap to hold my tube, co2, tire lever and co2 head.
    Baggy shorts - ziplock bag with multi tool, derailleur hanger w/ bolt, chain links, presta to Schrader adaptor, dollar bills and small zip ties
    Bike frame - bottle cage with either small or large bottle
    I like bikes

  24. #24
    TimB
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    Wow great info and thanks for all the replies!! My local trail has a lot of roots with very bouncy drops and very tight, S turns over roots, so a lot of standing up , bouncing ride, and most of the year here in Florida, it's warm to hot, so the back pack gets a bit hot and annoying , I think I'll try the front stem pack and maybe a saddle pack with a bottle rack and bottle on the lower frame , trying to keep the gear off my body and on the frame, I'll see how that works and then maybe get a good HoFo pack if I want to go back to a pack

  25. #25
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    I keep things to a minimum.

    Spare tube gets taped to the frame with electrical tape.

    No water if ride is less than 2 hrs.

    Modified multi-tool. Its a small one and I've replaced un-needed components (like a Phillips head driver) with more useful components from unused tools.

    Old school, compact, Columbia "fanny-pack". $10 used off ebay. I have 3 of them.

    If I do take water its with a 1L Platypus-type bladder (or Wally World version). No hose, just a bottle top lid.

    The urgency to hydrate or die, on the fly, is such BS.
    Last edited by Miker J; 04-30-2017 at 05:11 AM.

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Miker J View Post
    No water if ride is less than 2 hrs.
    I keep things to minimum too but that's hardcore! I'll often go through 2 bottles in less than 2 hours if it's hot and I put in a hard effort, I'd be suffering for sure with zero.
    I brake for stinkbugs

  27. #27
    since 4/10/2009
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    I don't love wearing a backpack, but I'm even less of a fan of retrieving dropped bottles.

    I also don't like swapping stuff around based on the ride. Right now, I keep everything in one pack, and I can just grab it and go. That convenience is the major attraction to me.

    I don't use a pack for my road/commute bike. I use bottles and a seat bag for it. And they always live on that bike. But I don't need to carry as much of a repair kit on that bike.

    On my mtb, I'm packing my repair kit (which is small enough to go in a seat bag or similar arrangement if it wasn't for the tire pump and shock pump), water, food, and a first aid kit, which kinda puts it over the top for packless carrying. I regularly will spend 5+hrs out on the trail. Maybe not riding a ton of miles, but some of the places I ride, walking out isn't a viable option. You might reach the nearest road in half a mile, but that isn't any consolation when you're still miles away from any assistance.

    Plus, I've lost track of how many times I've helped out "minimalists" with something from my kit - like the shock pump last weekend for my friend who was demoing a bike from a shop and wanted to tweak her suspension settings.

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    I don't love wearing a backpack, but I'm even less of a fan of retrieving dropped bottles.
    There's some good cages out there these days, mine are far from the best and I've been averaging about 1 dropped bottle per year on rides that included lots of fast chunky terrain.

    Even a minimalists bike can be pretty much grab & go. Multi-tool, pump and tube under the seat and it's always ready, just add water.
    I brake for stinkbugs

  29. #29
    since 4/10/2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    There's some good cages out there these days, mine are far from the best and I've been averaging about 1 dropped bottle per year on rides that included lots of fast chunky terrain.

    Even a minimalists bike can be pretty much grab & go. Multi-tool, pump and tube under the seat and it's always ready, just add water.
    I ride a fatbike. So my spare tubes are big and my pump can't be wimpy. And your solution doesn't account for the shock pump or first aid kit I carry, let alone the other small items from my repair kit. Again, even though I may not love wearing a pack (especially in hot, humid conditions), it really is the best, most convenient way to pack. A good frame bag is probably a close 2nd, but it would take some work to keep the small items from rattling around in chunky terrain. And frame bags for most FS bikes aren't exactly cavernous.

  30. #30
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    This topic is so geographically dependent it's laughable. I respect that some guys live in a place where taking no water is an option, but for most riders living in AZ, NV, NM, UT, TX, SoCal, and even some places north and east of there it's not only ill-advised, it's downright stupid.

    Living in Phoenix, I don't leave the house with less than 2 bottles, even in winter. At any point later than about mid April, it may be literally suicide. it was 100F here last week.

    I rode with 2 bottles and a small saddle bag carrying a tube, 2 16gm Co2s and a multi tool for short rides during part of winter, and while no 'monkey on my back' was liberating, I didn't much care for the extra 6-7lbs (2lb per bottle, 2lb saddle bag) on my bike. I also didn't like the ever prevalent water-rationing game when I'm thirsty and my first bottle is gone, but I'm an hour from the car- hence the reason I limit bottle rides to short rides.

    It sucks, but I've just decided to live with being chained to my Camelbak Skyline pack.
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  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    I also don't like swapping stuff around based on the ride. Right now, I keep everything in one pack, and I can just grab it and go.
    This is a big deal for me too. It's bad enough sorting stuff out for a ride without having to think about where all the tools etc are so I keep tools and a spares on each bike. Never need to think about it.

    When it's warm, an insulated hydration pack keeps your water colder than a bottle does. You can also fill the bottle or pack with ice. By the time you're out on the ride it will be melted but still a lot colder than just water would have been. Works pretty well.

  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    I ride a fatbike. So my spare tubes are big and my pump can't be wimpy....
    As mentioned everyone should do whatever is comfortable and necessary for themselves and I'd never argue otherwise. The op was looking for suggestions to lose the pack for ~1.5 hour rides though and there are a lot of good and viable options to do that. I was just relaying some of the positive sides of being pack-free based on my own experiences.
    I brake for stinkbugs

  33. #33
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    Check out some of the bikepacking downtube bags. I have an older rouge panda oracle bag and it fits a pump, two tubes (maxxis ultralight cinched down with velcro straps), multitool, patch kit, headlamp, etc... Water bottle on the frame, strapped down with a rubber band if I'm riding gnar. If the weather looks sketchy I'll strap an outdoor research helium 2 jacket to my frame with velcro straps.

    Here's the bag on my intense, no backpack required although sometimes I'll wear a jersey with pockets for my phone and keys.
    Done with hydro pack , how do you bring water-20170419_191115.jpg

    Also of note, the downtube spot there seems to be the best without messing with the handling, if you strap stuff near the fork between the top tube and downtube it changes the balance point more when doing a manual.

  34. #34
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    I have a pretty full Camelbak. I'm so used to riding with it I can't the last time I went on a proper ride without it. To the poster above I'd rather not attach anything to my bike. Given that I've got an hour drive to the nearest trailhead I want everything in one place at all times.
    To be honest, aside from water and food, I've used tools more for other people I encounter than I do on my own bike. If I had trails within riding distance of home it might be different. I view a backpack as essential as gloves or a helmet.

  35. #35
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    Since I have lost weight, I notice the weight of a pack a lot more. I don't know why, it is way out of proportion to the 30 pounds I lost since I started riding.

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    I keep things to minimum too but that's hardcore! I'll often go through 2 bottles in less than 2 hours if it's hot and I put in a hard effort, I'd be suffering for sure with zero.

    We are so humid at times I think I return from my ride more hydrated from osmosis!


    I've ridden in the Rockies were its much drier and I'm shocked as to how much water is lost through evaporation. So, I'd likely change my style if I did not live in the NE.

  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Miker J View Post
    We are so humid at times I think I return from my ride more hydrated from osmosis!


    I've ridden in the Rockies were its much drier and I'm shocked as to how much water is lost through evaporation. So, I'd likely change my style if I did not live in the NE.

    No doubt. On a recent 2 hour ride I barely went through 1/2 bottle because it was overcast, fairly humid, cool and no wind which is a rarity around here. Add some heat, wind and sub-10% humidity and it's totally a different deal.
    I brake for stinkbugs

  38. #38
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    I've used a hydration pack for rides of any duration since the mid 90's. Saw nearly all my riding buddies come down with nasty cases of giardia after getting contaminated water splashed on their water bottles. Having the drink tube up higher really minimizes that risk, especially if the bite valve is covered.

  39. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by Notched View Post
    I view a backpack as essential as gloves or a helmet.
    Me too, for the most part. If I'm doing a short ride, I just fill my bladder less.

    Quote Originally Posted by Miker J View Post
    We are so humid at times I think I return from my ride more hydrated from osmosis!


    I've ridden in the Rockies were its much drier and I'm shocked as to how much water is lost through evaporation. So, I'd likely change my style if I did not live in the NE.
    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    No doubt. On a recent 2 hour ride I barely went through 1/2 bottle because it was overcast, fairly humid, cool and no wind which is a rarity around here. Add some heat, wind and sub-10% humidity and it's totally a different deal.
    Cool and humid is one thing. Heat with humidity is far worse, than heat with low humidity. You warm up because of a combo of exercise and high ambient temps. High humidity reduces the effectiveness of evaporative cooling, so sweating doesn't cool you off. So you sweat more. It's at least obvious that you're losing lots of water, which is different than heat with low humidity. But it generally means I'm carrying even more water - not for drinking, but for cooling off.

    The only times of year I could really manage to get by with just a bottle for short rides would be short periods in spring and fall. But I don't generally do as many short rides in the fall. That's when I really like to do LONG rides. 10hr days, multi-day bikepacking rides, etc. I typically reserve bottles for drink mixes when it's especially hot in summertime or when I'm doing really long rides and need extra capacity. I have even been known to pack 2 full 3L bladders in my pack, but that kind of weight doesn't carry well in the pack I tend to use.

    Quote Originally Posted by Fairbanks007 View Post
    Saw nearly all my riding buddies come down with nasty cases of giardia after getting contaminated water splashed on their water bottles.
    Good point. I wonder how frequently this happens and the dots don't get connected.

  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold View Post
    Cool and humid is one thing. Heat with humidity is far worse, than heat with low humidity. You warm up because of a combo of exercise and high ambient temps. High humidity reduces the effectiveness of evaporative cooling, so sweating doesn't cool you off. So you sweat more. It's at least obvious that you're losing lots of water, which is different than heat with low humidity. But it generally means I'm carrying even more water - not for drinking, but for cooling off.

    I agree, once you get up into the double 90's (90 degrees/90% humidity) it's brutal, I don't miss the midwest in that regard.

    The ultra arid environments of the SW have their own challenges too, your sweat evaporates so fast you don't even realize your sweating which makes it easy to just forget to drink until it's too late. 100 degrees in the shade @ 5% humidity can feel deceptively comfortable. Super dry air and wind makes it even worse IME, especially at altitude.
    I brake for stinkbugs

  41. #41
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    I don't have room on my frame for a water bottle, but I can fit a tool keg. I am getting a small bag to strap on my top tube, and plan to put 600ml of water in the keg. I also have SWAT bibs that can carry a 1l bottle very comfortably, and even that and a 600ml pretty well. Much more comfortable for me to carry water there than in jersey pockets. The SWAT pockets are higher up than jersey's, and I don't have to wear a sausage casing top. I will be able to carry tools, tube, CO2, phone, vest, and 2.2l of water, with no pack, and a very tight front triangle.
    I got some bad ideas in my head.

  42. #42
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    I've though about going without a pack in the past but was never able to make it work. Tools and such can fit on the bike easily enough. But I can't take enough water to last a ride. On a cool day I drink around 1 liter every hour. When it's hot out it's around 2 liters per hour.
    I also don't like having things in pockets, it's either got to go in a backpack or on the bike.
    I also find it convenient to be able to drink while on the go.

  43. #43
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    Cool-blue Rhythm

    I ride 'Packless' on Hard rides under two hours..

    If fully hydrated before the ride and needing to take a piss at the trail head and pissing almost clear I then need 8-10 oz's of water every hour during the ride and a full re-hydrate back at the trail head.
    I carry one 24oz bottle with a 50/50 mix of water and Red Low Calorie Gatorade.
    Tools, tube and phone In my frame pack, munchies In the top tube pack..

    Done with hydro pack , how do you bring water-img_20170315_141603_996.jpg

    On 3-4 hour rides I use my Camelbak Palos 4LR,,, Holds 50 oz of water.

    Done with hydro pack , how do you bring water-camelbak-palos-4lr-2016-photo-1.jpg

    On Half day rides or more I carry 100oz In my Camelbak Volt 13R.

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  44. #44
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    Living in southern AZ (Tucson), I simply do not ride off road without a camelbak that also has my gear to include first aid and bike stuff. If I am doing a short ride in the trails near my house that are all interconnected loops within a 3ish square mile (5is square km) area, I will just fill it to what I think I need for the ride (as little as 1L for short rides), since help is never more than a few mile walk or a cell phone call (with a fire station a mile up the road) away.

    If I am going to more remote areas such as AZ trail segments or whatever, I do not leave with less than a full 3L camelbak and 24oz bottle full. Works out to about a gallon.

    Even though, most of my rides would never result in using all of this water, it is also a survival thing. if I am injured and not in cell range, that water needs to keep me alive until someone finds me.

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    carry water, it's safety.

    I dont like backpacks either. there are posters on here who will only consider a bike with two bottle cages because they collected data and are faster with bottles on the cage. camelbak podium is the only bottle i use.

    i ride a saddlebag with tire levers, crankbros multitool, patches, zip ties. small pump attached to frame, spare tube wrapped around frame. For shorter looped riders, i would probably carry less stuff, but I like my bike set it and forget and sometimes i'm 6 miles away from my car.
    Last edited by bob13bob; 05-04-2017 at 12:03 PM.

  46. #46
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    I stopped the water bottles after a number of rough rides and tumbles and them always popping out or getting dislodged. So a nice form fitting pack stuck to me wherever I go. And I'm normally out for anywhere from 4 - 7 hrs on a trail so I def need my pack to be filled. Heavy, but it's saved my butt a handful of times.

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    Most rides under 2 hours, I go packless. Bottle cage with up to a 24oz bottle. It's a Spesh SWAT cage with the tool mounted to it so no leaving home with out it. Also have the SWAT chain breaker in the steer tube. May never use it but it's nice to have. Backcountry Research strap holds a tube, Co2, and tire tool. Phone, food, and extras go in pockets. For longer rides, I have a Camelbak Skyline.

    Be safe. Take water. Dehydration is serious business.

  48. #48
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    Just read an article in dirtrag about this. Pretty scary sounding, keep hydrated!

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rhabdomyolysis
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  49. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by Miker J View Post
    I keep things to a minimum.

    Spare tube gets taped to the frame with electrical tape.

    No water if ride is less than 2 hrs.

    Modified multi-tool. Its a small one and I've replaced un-needed components (like a Phillips head driver) with more useful components from unused tools.

    Old school, compact, Columbia "fanny-pack". $10 used off ebay. I have 3 of them.

    If I do take water its with a 1L Platypus-type bladder (or Wally World version). No hose, just a bottle top lid.

    The urgency to hydrate or die, on the fly, is such BS.
    2 hours? Hmmm. Do you ride when it is above 60F? At all? Some folks sweat more, thus the need for regular hydration in the heat of 70-95 F here in MA. Ever had heat stroke? Not fun.

  50. #50
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    Odd thread. Hydration pack all the way for me for any ride beyond the corner store or pub. Have used them for ever; I can't even see how people think they are inconvenient. I use a bottle carrier for my tube levers and multi-tool, keeps it all together, lower on the bike and less guff in my pack

  51. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by leeboh View Post
    2 hours? Hmmm. Do you ride when it is above 60F? At all? Some folks sweat more, thus the need for regular hydration in the heat of 70-95 F here in MA. Ever had heat stroke? Not fun.
    I've done 2 hour rides without water, just preload at the car and drink a bunch after when you get back. I looped the hiline trail in Sedona with all the connectors to get there from bike n bean and didn't stop for water, but that only took an hour and it wasn't that hot out.

    Depending on your trail system if you have loops that end up at your car that helps too, did a bunch of loops in Eagle, CO last Sunday and didn't bother taking water for a 1000ft climb / downhill that only takes 40 min, did 4000ft that day with 3 water stops inbetween loops at my car.

  52. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by Miker J View Post
    I keep things to a minimum.

    Spare tube gets taped to the frame with electrical tape.

    No water if ride is less than 2 hrs.

    Modified multi-tool. Its a small one and I've replaced un-needed components (like a Phillips head driver) with more useful components from unused tools.

    Old school, compact, Columbia "fanny-pack". $10 used off ebay. I have 3 of them.

    If I do take water its with a 1L Platypus-type bladder (or Wally World version). No hose, just a bottle top lid.

    The urgency to hydrate or die, on the fly, is such BS.
    No disrespect man but don't post stuff as ignorant as that last line on here, you'll get people killed.

    Fact:. High humidity combined with high temps is more dangerous for heat stroke because body can't cool off due to sweat being able to evaporate being inhibited greatly.

    I've spent years working in conditions that most would quit or collapse. Inside is 15-20F hotter than outside and humidity was up to 30% higher. Now combine that with being in the Midwest:

    96F at 3pm, 60% humidity OUTSIDE. 110-115F inside the plant with humidity in the 80-90% range. And hotter near the machines (seen over 125F a few times).

    Not hydrating properly before shift and continuing during shift was why we placed bets on how many would get sick or collapse. "Can lead a horse to water, can't make them drink" is meant in a literal sense here. I was a safety coordinator and Emergency First Responder. I did everything I could and people just like you are the ones I was carrying out of the plant every summer, usually just to the break room but a couple were to an ambulance.

    You may be lucky enough to get by with that (will catch up with you in time)but don't try to convince others your right. Good way to get people killed. And not a scare tactic, someone collapses miles from anything on a trail and either gets badly injury or passes out and goes hours without being found. Funeral instead of hospital trip.

    Don't need to carry a hydro pack for everything, but you need to carry enough water so you don't get sick. I do a standard bottle for anything over 30 minutes up to an hour, anything an hour or more depending on temp dictates a 1L bottle of water in the cage (smart water bottles fit perfect so I buy a few every season to use as water bottles for average rides on hot days) or if it's really hot/long ride it's a pack for sure.

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  53. #53
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    Lots of factors at play here, humidity, outside temp, how crowded the trails are, etc... if it's that hot with that kind of humidity I probably wouldn't bother riding my bike.

  54. #54
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    I do all the time, less people on the the trails lol, just usually not out more than an hour

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  55. #55
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    Don't be a Donut, carry water.

    Living in las vegas, yes there are times when i will go out around my neighborhood without water but i will never ever go out in the desert without hydration. Especially not if i'm riding alone.

    Even though you may have been ok before, all it takes is something like you getting hurt on the trail and being out there without any relief from the sun and that 1 hour easy ride that you usually don't need water on now turns into a problem.

  56. #56
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    aluminum or stainless bottle cages bent in slightly so there's tension on the bottle work awesomely and I've never ejected a bottle over anything bumpy with this configuration. I ride with a small pack to carry my gear(it's a hydration pack without the bladder lol), but simply prefer hydrating from bottles. I typically carry two on the bike and one or two in my pack as a reserve depending on how warm it is out and how far I intend to bike.

    When I used to ride packless I had a small pump attached to the frame alongside one of one of the bottle cages and most everything fit into a saddlebag.

  57. #57
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    A couple of you guys have cited dropped/shaken out bottles as atleast partial reasons for not using bottles.

    Have you tried Specialized Ribcage? (I think that's what it's called. I haven't bought any new ones in a while so the name might be wrong) Anyway, I have never dropped a bottle with one of those. Not once. I have noticed the rivets on the frame getting creaky however. I think it might be symptom of the bottle being held well and the jostling force being transmitted to the frame/rivets.

    Me personally, I ride with two bottles on the frame, and one in my center jersey pocket. That one is the first to get emptied. I don't mind packs either but don't ride with them much anymore. Always used bottles except for a short stint when packs were sorta new back in the late 90's. My one pack is an overly large Camelback Transalp, that sees duty as a basic backpack most times, and when riding with wife and son, we have a small Camelbak that carries everything for the three of us.

  58. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by jochribs View Post
    A couple of you guys have cited dropped/shaken out bottles as atleast partial reasons for not using bottles. Have you tried Specialized Ribcage?
    I actually have one of those in the shed that I have never used. No need as I don't have a problem with the Hydrapack for rougher rides. It does look pretty secure, which is why I've never used it. I like to be able to grab the bottle easily on the move. Catch 22 I guess ;0)

  59. #59
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    Ha, hear your reasoning on that MP. But they're not bad for getting the bottle out oddly enough.

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    you're using the wrong bottle cages if they ejecting bottles. i've had excellent luck with chinese carbon fiber cages.

  61. #61
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    My vote is for Arundel cages (plastic about $15.00 @ Jensons) and my bottle cage is under my down tube.. messy but the bottle holds quite well. Disclosure: I don't ride heavy rock gardens.

    The one my CX is a cheap Alloy one, but it's the other way around where its a real... beetch to get out which is also a problem. Holds well though, if I can get it back in
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  62. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by bob13bob View Post
    You're using the wrong bottle cages if they ejecting bottles. i've had excellent luck with Chinese carbon fibre cages.
    It depends on what you're riding at the time. A hard-tail on certain trails will shake the fillings out of your head.

  63. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Pig View Post
    It depends on what you're riding at the time. A hard-tail on certain trails will shake the fillings out of your head.
    OR what you are riding.. i.e. Rigid - That was a wake up call on the trails
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  64. #64
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    not really, i could pick up my complete bike from just the bottle on my previous cages. There were too tight imo.

  65. #65
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    Thanks for all the input guys, Im learning a lot. I had a great ride yesterday morning, I ride about 8 miles in the woods, usually takes me about an hour and a half, but I cut it down to an hour, after a young guy passed me by. Im 62 so Im a bit older than most of you Im guessing.

    I ride in Florida heat and humidity, so staying hydrated is really important.Though mornings are cool now, in summer, they will be hot. I like the Opsrey back pack, I might get that one, I sued my back pack but it needs replaced. The water bottle on the frame would not work for me I guess cause my tires throw up a lot of sand all over my legs, so Im sure a bottle would be all sandy too.I have a fist aid pouch and a multi tool, need to get a tire infiltrator too. But I can walk out of my trail in about a half hour so a flat tire would not be a disaster anyway.

  66. #66
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    I ride prepared so will always have my camelbak.. have had the occasions where I went unprepared and had something go wrong and hiking out of trails in the cold or at night is never ideal. But you seem to have your answers so put a bottle rack on and a small seat pouch. It'll work for you.


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  67. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by Runfox View Post
    The water bottle on the frame would not work for me I guess cause my tires throw up a lot of sand all over my legs, so Im sure a bottle would be all sandy too..
    Same problem here. Got the fanny pack I linked to before, but may still use a water bottle on the frame for short rides, or to supplement the two on the pack for longer ones.
    I've been using a 21oz Camelbak Podium. It would(did) get dirt and mud all in the mouthpiece, but I started covering it with a Ziploc bag. Kind of a pain, and I'm going to buy another bottle with a screw top, but it works.
    Done with hydro pack , how do you bring water-wb.jpg

  68. #68
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    I really dislike wearing a hydration pack when I ride and have had problems with bottle cages in the past. I ride a rigid bike on rocky trails in Southern California so they often bounce out. I carry all my bike stuff (tools, patch kit, tape, tizties, tube.) in a medium sized seat bag. Never had a problem with one failing before. Carry my cell phone and keys in shorts pockets. Always in pockets with a zipper, have lost stuff with normal pockets.

    For water, I will agree its safer and a good idea to carry water when you ride but I usually didn't on my typical hour long ride in the morning. Though, I hydrated well beforehand, ate a light breakfast like a banana and some walnuts/almonds and had plenty of water and food back in my truck. For longer rides I carried a .5L bottle in a cage on the downtube and used a small rubber strap to hold it in place. I've still had that fail on me but carry it anyway. Another good thing was I often rode through Balboa Park which has great trails but also water fountains if you look hard enough. Once I knew where a few were I would start my ride with an empty bottle (or no bottle) and stop to drink or fill it halfway along the ride depending on how I felt. That way I wasn't carrying a heavy bottle all the time. Not complaining about weight but a full/heavy bottle seems more prone to bounce out of the bottle cage. An empty bottle always stays put.

  69. #69
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    Don't see the drama with just putting a few cages on your bike and using bottles...works for so many people. For that kind of ride, 1 bottle is more than sufficient unless you are killing it/maxed out/its 100 degrees out. Get a small seat bag for your other bits or an Awesome Strap if you are really living on the edge. Stick your candy bar in your pocket. Ride. It never ceases to amaze me how much $hit people carry on a 1-2 hour bike ride in a backpack.
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    As an avid hiker I can appreciate and support those who are stating to bring water whether it's a long or short ride. Mother Nature has no forgiveness and anything can happen. Best to be over prepared than not.

    Case in point, I was hiking a local mountain and after summiting I noticed the clouds rolling in and starting to come up the ridge. Quickly grabbed my gear and started heading down the mtn and sure enough 1,000ft below the summit i was hiking in a white out situation. Trail was completely covered in snow and was very easy to lose sight. Eventually I was able to navigate another 3,000ft down and get to the trailhead but had I not had all my gear and had to stay the night on the ridge, it would have been a very different outcome.

  71. #71
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    Replying to OwenM

    I always thought everyone squirts water into mouth without ever contacting the mouthpiece. In some conditions, squirt a little out to clean and then squirt into mouth.

  72. #72
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    Didn't read the whole thread. I've moved away from packs on short rides. I also use a back country research mutherload for my pump and tube. Small multi in the pocket and bottle on the bike. Here's a pic


    I've not yet dropped a bottle but my frame is so small I can only use small bottles without tire rub.

    I look forward to trying these bibs from Pactimo. They have pockets built in for stuff.
    https://www.pactimo.com/collections/...t-liner-mens-1

    I tried a Camelback Fanny pack and didn't like it at all. Didn't stay put unless uncomfortably tight. I've heard the Osprey ones are pretty good though.

    Good luck!


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  73. #73
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    I tried to order some Pactimo's but they don't ship to Canada, so I have been wearing the Specialized Swats, and Sombre Smuggle shorts. I love having the bottle back there, as it's unobtrusive, and always clean. Where I live it's sloppy 1/2 the time and every thing gets covered in mud
    I got some bad ideas in my head.

  74. #74
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    Quote Originally Posted by Runfox View Post
    Thanks for all the input guys, Im learning a lot. I had a great ride yesterday morning, I ride about 8 miles in the woods, usually takes me about an hour and a half, but I cut it down to an hour, after a young guy passed me by. Im 62 so Im a bit older than most of you Im guessing.

    I ride in Florida heat and humidity, so staying hydrated is really important.Though mornings are cool now, in summer, they will be hot. I like the Opsrey back pack, I might get that one, I sued my back pack but it needs replaced. The water bottle on the frame would not work for me I guess cause my tires throw up a lot of sand all over my legs, so Im sure a bottle would be all sandy too.I have a fist aid pouch and a multi tool, need to get a tire infiltrator too. But I can walk out of my trail in about a half hour so a flat tire would not be a disaster anyway.
    Yep I ride Swamp trails also, I take a small swig then spit on the bottle and suck very little sand now and then, no biggie.

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  75. #75
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    Quote Originally Posted by bob13bob View Post
    "carry water, it's safety."

    "and sometimes i'm 6 miles away from my car."
    Same principal as a condom,

    "I'd rather have It and not need It, Than need It and Not have It"

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  76. #76
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    Quote Originally Posted by SunnyRidge View Post
    Replying to OwenM

    I always thought everyone squirts water into mouth without ever contacting the mouthpiece. In some conditions, squirt a little out to clean and then squirt into mouth.
    Pack it with mud and see how that works out for you. I don't put that Ziploc on there for aesthetic appeal

  77. #77
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    This thread reminds me of something that happened a couple of years ago.

    My wife works in schools and the deputy head of one of the local high-schools and her husband were on holiday in California. They were keep walkers and went out for a long walk one day. They were both very fit, used to long walks and were carrying water.

    While out she started to feel unwell and they headed back. Realising they weren't going to making back, the woman's husband called 911. By the time the emergency services arrived she had passed out and she did not regain conciousness. She died of dehydration.

    Going out without water in hot weather is very silly. even if you only expect to be out for an hour, you don't know what might happen. You could fall off your bike or take unwell and be unable to get back. If you're going to a place where no water is available, take plenty.

  78. #78
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    Quote Originally Posted by TiGeo View Post
    Don't see the drama with just putting a few cages on your bike and using bottles...works for so many people. For that kind of ride, 1 bottle is more than sufficient unless you are killing it/maxed out/its 100 degrees out. Get a small seat bag for your other bits or an Awesome Strap if you are really living on the edge. Stick your candy bar in your pocket. Ride. It never ceases to amaze me how much $hit people carry on a 1-2 hour bike ride in a backpack.
    1. not all bikes accept 2 or even 1 full size bottle.
    2. Human sweat rates are unique to the person
    3. Its hot in Texas, Florida, etc. I ride when its 100+ for several hours. I can loose 5 pounds of water per hour.
    4. 1 Gallon is ~8 pounds an there are no stops for water on my trail
    5. I'm "killing it"

  79. #79
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    Thanks to bikepacking's popularity we now have more ways to mount bottles/cages. I ride a rigid 29er and have never lost a bottle with Arundel, Elite, or King cages.
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  80. #80
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    me problem here. Got the fanny pack I linked to before, but may still use a water bottle on the frame for short rides, or to supplement the two on the pack for longer ones.
    I've been using a 21oz Camelbak Podium. It would(did) get dirt and mud all in the mouthpiece, but I started covering it with a Ziploc bag. Kind of a pain, and I'm going to buy another bottle with a screw top, but it works.
    when it's wet, i have the same problem on my trails. I unscrew the cap and drink that way. This wouldn't work in race conditions, but i don't race as much as I ride. still prefer this over a backpack. Also i can dissemble my podium bottles quickly and dishwash.

    if you do any sort of group riding like i do, you'll always want ot have tubes,patches, quality multitool on you. I'll fix it, but my time is too valuable to deal with dinky tools.

    In my van, in my riding duffel. I care spare helmet, extra water, extra sweater and gloves. I've learned from experience. I just like maximizing my ride time / mess around time ratio.

    yeah, i've seen a hiker die from probable heat stroke on a trail. If you're even asking how much water you need, then the answer is never

  81. #81
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    Lots of variables in this discussion, including location, temperature, weather, remoteness of ride location, etc. For me, 30 years of seat bags and bottle cages on my mountain bikes have worked very well, unless I am going to be out for 4+ hours or in a remote location. Only then do I wear a hydration pack for additional water, clothing, and supplies.

    I have been using the light and inexpensive Cateye plastic water bottle cages since they were introduced, and only lost one bottle in that time due to a 20 year old cage being worn enough to allow the bottle to pop out in a rock garden. I have been finding these in very good used condition at the local co-op and used bike shops for $1 each lately.
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    On my frames that have room, I use two bottle cages for water and a seat bag for spare tube, tools, and inflation.
    Done with hydro pack , how do you bring water-18237967_10212935912781522_3474548187158051131_o.jpg

    When going on a longer ride with a bike that only has room for a single bottle cage, I will use a handlebar mounted feed bag to carry a second bottle (or use it for a 3rd bottle on the 2 cage bikes where the additional capacity is needed). Tube, tools, and inflation still go in the seat bag.
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  82. #82
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    Quote Originally Posted by leeboh View Post
    2 hours? Hmmm. Do you ride when it is above 60F? At all? Some folks sweat more, thus the need for regular hydration in the heat of 70-95 F here in MA. Ever had heat stroke? Not fun.

    Only seems to be a few really hot days a year around here.

    Within a hour of leaving before a ride I drink about a liter of water.

    I would not advocate others riding with out water. But going without for relatively short periods might not be as radical as the hydration pack manufacturers would have you think. I'd think it not rare for some to do physical labor in moderate temps without a drink for a 2 hour or less span.

    Of course there would be exceptions to how I pack. If the ride might last more than 2 hours; if riding where there would be a lot of sun exposure; riding with others who might not know their way around; unusually hot days; etc...

    If a rider thinks their environment or physical make up might predispose them to significant dehydration, by all means take plenty of water. Don't risk that.

    For the sake of the OP I wanted to point out its ok to try to be minimalistic. For every one rider I see run out of water, I see dozens hauling around 15# packs full of stuff they don't need, and sweating their balls off doing so.

    The other point I wanted to make to the OP was the "need" to hydrate on the fly with a hose is really not necessary for most. I"m not so hard core that I can't stop to smell the roses and unscrew a cap. When I do bring water it goes in a 1L soft bladder with a bottle top cap and it goes in my old Columbia "fanny pack". Along with a small multi tool, small knife, bandana, CO2/inflator, and a small roll of electrical tape. Tube is taped to the bike.


    Anyone know the science on how much one really needs to drink when exercising?

  83. #83
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    so much good info and experience here guys, thanks, My ride is a 2016 G TKarakoram 29er hard tail. I love my bike, its giant improvement over my cheap dept store full suspension bike. But I do bounce like crazy over the palmetto roots and such. One day when I retire in a few years Ill have the money for a good full suspension bike, which will help over all the bumps. I think Ill get a good hydration pack soon , looking at an Osprey Raptor 14 a,d need to get my Co2 tire pump and some other things, as money is available.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Miker J View Post
    Anyone know the science on how much one really needs to drink when exercising?
    Yes, it is dependent upon the person and factors such as personal sweat rate. Sounds like you don't ride very hard at all. I don't think you are comprehending very well either. Sure I can go out and hammer on the bike in zone 4 for 1:30 without water and come back. Performance will suffer. I will come back in 6-8 pounds lighter and at risk for severe dehydration/headache. Others would be on the verge of heat stroke, but I'm acclimated to riding in heat.

    What happens when I have a mechanical 6 miles out after going real hard for an hour without the appropriate amount of water? Even worse, what if an injury takes you down?



    YOU are just moving water from the body to the frame anyways. The right hydration pack is not hot. I'm not going to add 4 pounds to my bike... kind of defeats the purpose of having a carbon bike. Handling characteristic suffer, arms are more fatigued, Traction out of the saddle is slightly higher for braking and climbing.

  85. #85
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    Quote Originally Posted by FJSnoozer View Post
    Yes, it is dependent upon the person and factors such as personal sweat rate. Sounds like you don't ride very hard at all. I don't think you are comprehending very well either. Sure I can go out and hammer on the bike in zone 4 for 1:30 without water and come back. Performance will suffer. I will come back in 6-8 pounds lighter and at risk for severe dehydration/headache. Others would be on the verge of heat stroke, but I'm acclimated to riding in heat.

    What happens when I have a mechanical 6 miles out after going real hard for an hour without the appropriate amount of water? Even worse, what if an injury takes you down?



    YOU are just moving water from the body to the frame anyways. The right hydration pack is not hot. I'm not going to add 4 pounds to my bike... kind of defeats the purpose of having a carbon bike. Handling characteristic suffer, arms are more fatigued, Traction out of the saddle is slightly higher for braking and climbing.
    For climbing it's more efficient to have the weight of the water carried by the wheels on your bike than adding it to your body weight. If something serious happened regarding dehydration, where I ride there are tons of fresh mountain streams everywhere. In Moab or other desert places I'll always bring lots of water.

  86. #86
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    Quote Originally Posted by FJSnoozer View Post
    Yes, it is dependent upon the person and factors such as personal sweat rate. Sounds like you don't ride very hard at all. I don't think you are comprehending very well either. Sure I can go out and hammer on the bike in zone 4 for 1:30 without water and come back. Performance will suffer. I will come back in 6-8 pounds lighter and at risk for severe dehydration/headache. Others would be on the verge of heat stroke, but I'm acclimated to riding in heat.

    What happens when I have a mechanical 6 miles out after going real hard for an hour without the appropriate amount of water? Even worse, what if an injury takes you down?
    Perhaps you need so much water because...

    Where I ride we have the cooling effecting of mountains and their downhills

    And where you ride in Florida and Texas it's just flat and full of hot air.

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    "You must spread some reputation around before giving it to Mikerj again"

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    Frame mounted bottle cage for short rides.

    Longer rides I mix n match with Revelate feedbags (have a pair, sometimes just use one, if that's all I need), and also have a Two Fish adapter to attach a bottle cage to my seatpost (put it in front...use a few wraps of grip tape to minimize it rotating and hitting my legs, but every once in a while I use a thigh to straighten it back up).

    Use a Topeak seat bag to house all my repair stuff.
    Anthem Advanced
    ECR

  89. #89
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    I made and tested the first version of my frame bag yesterday. Fits a 3L bladder, snacks, cellphone, keys, etc.... Have the bladder hose routed out and bite valve mounted on the bars, will attach it with an id badge reel when one arrives. Previously with a bottle cage due to the shock location on the Spider I could only carry one 20oz bottle.

    Tested it on a ride with 4,550ft of climbing yesterday over 31 miles. I was way faster on every segment when compared to carrying the same amount of water / weight in a backpack. Used ROK straps (bungee straps with clips) to keep the bladder / pack tight to the downtube as well as keeping the bladder from bulging out (had zero issues with crank arm rubbing).

    I would say there is a new favorite order.

    1. frame bags
    2. hip / fanny packs
    3. backpacks

    I made it myself, but rouge panda makes some awesome similar frame bags, they are where I got the idea from (I have their downtube bag and it works excellent).

    Done with hydro pack , how do you bring water-20170513_142055_1.jpgDone with hydro pack , how do you bring water-20170513_162340_1.jpgDone with hydro pack , how do you bring water-20170513_162346_1.jpg
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Done with hydro pack , how do you bring water-20170513_142055.jpg  


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    I really don't get this framebag, reinvention of a mousetrap. How is it going to make you faster? Plenty of straps to come loose and get tangled in moving bits. Said straps and bag will end up wearing holes in the frames paint. The hose routing looks like it will be a mission to drink. How do you fill it? With the garden hose?

  91. #91
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    Quote Originally Posted by MozFat View Post
    I really don't get this framebag, reinvention of a mousetrap. How is it going to make you faster? Plenty of straps to come loose and get tangled in moving bits. Said straps and bag will end up wearing holes in the frames paint. The hose routing looks like it will be a mission to drink. How do you fill it? With the garden hose?
    The idea was new to me too, learned about it from bikepacking. 3m scotchgard protects the frame, straps are holding up fine, it unzips just like a backpack to pull the reservoir out and fill it. Hose routing will be fixed once I get a proper clip and reel to attach it with. It is faster since I no longer have a bulky backpack flying all over the place when I'm bombing a rock garden, or a pack weighing me down or constricting breathing on the climbs. This was the first version with cheaper fabric, next version will be sleeker and weigh less with x Pac fabric.

  92. #92
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    I've landed on my backpack more than once. It stays.

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    Quote Originally Posted by kitejumping View Post
    I made and tested the first version of my frame bag yesterday. Fits a 3L bladder, snacks, cellphone, keys, etc.... Have the bladder hose routed out and bite valve mounted on the bars, will attach it with an id badge reel when one arrives.
    This hydration frame bag is a great idea. Especially with the ID reel attached. It does look a bit weird and prone to problems on a full suspension bike but most frame bags do. The only thing I would change is mounting the hose on the stem close to the steerer tube. It would minimize snagging it on a branch and it wouldn't get pulled as much when you steer. Awesome idea, I may copy it for my frame bag build.

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    Quote Originally Posted by sgltrak View Post
    Lots of variables in this discussion, including location, temperature, weather, remoteness of ride location, etc.
    Well, before it somehow turned into an epic trek across the desert landscape, it was about a guy who's riding for 1.5hr on a short loop trail that he's already done with no water.
    As a backpacker, there's a huge variation in how much water I carry, though, and all depending on where I am, and what I'm doing there. 2 .75L Smartwater bottles are what get used most often, but I've carried no water at all(with a Sawyer Mini and straw in a shoulder strap pocket) when hiking along flowing water, and 4L in unfamiliar territory with the next certain water source 19 miles away. IMO, the right answer is always whatever works best for the situation.

    Quote Originally Posted by kitejumping View Post
    I made and tested the first version of my frame bag yesterday.
    While personally more interested in just a downtube bag like yours, I think it's really cool that you made your own frame bag.
    Looks nice, and obviously makes use of all the available space
    I'm another who's leery of putting too much on the bike itself(weight matters to a point-just not sure where that point is for me), but that's a neat solution for a hydration bladder without having to wear it.

  95. #95
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    Yeah, initially I wasn't sure if it would mess with the handling too much, but with having the weight low and centered on the bike it is barely noticeable, I can still manual a whole block length no problem. Another bonus is as the ride goes on the bike gets lighter haha. It also helps that this bike is stupidly light, 28ish lbs with full coil setup (have a ti coil in my pike).

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    USWE pack for me.

    Light, doesn't bounce around, almost perfect for rides longer that require more than a bottle.

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    Sweet job kitejumper! Line that puppy with reflectix from home depot and that water will stay icy all ride and till morning.

  98. #98
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    Quote Originally Posted by OwenM View Post
    Have a larger fanny pack otw. Wanted something that'd hold a couple of bottles securely and some minimal gear for this summer, so ordered this:

    https://www.rei.com/product/880880/u...viti-waistpack
    This Ultimate Direction Kaviti is working out well for use on the bike.
    I wouldn't want to run with it, since it does bounce around then, but it's solid for riding and walking. Being surprised at how heavy the pack felt when taking it off, when I didn't even notice it while wearing it, kind of tells the tale. Very comfortable.
    It doesn't have room for my pump, which is getting attached to the bottle cage, and I hate the included bottles, which were instantly replaced by 20oz Gatorade ones.
    Other than that, it's great. It will completely replace my hydration pack except for long rides that don't have me going back by my car, which is unusual, since I typically do stacked loops and figure 8s with the car parked in a central location. Might miss having a hydration bladder packed with ice some when it gets hotter, but won't miss the river of sweat running down my butt from having a pack on my back.

  99. #99
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    Quote Originally Posted by RAKC Ind View Post
    No disrespect man but don't post stuff as ignorant as that last line on here, you'll get people killed....

    Sent from my XT1565 using Tapatalk

    "The urgency to hydrate or die, on the fly..." was a reference to being too busy to stop and drink, and sucking water from a tube.


    The trails were not littered with dried up dead bodies prior to the over priced Camelbak.


    The OP was inquiring about options to hydration packs. Marketers would have us believe that we are far to radical to stop and drink from an old screw top bottle, or that the body will turn to dust without a continuous infusion of fluid during physical exertion

    No one here is advising against others hydrating on a potentially long, hot ride. If my post came across that way that should help to clarify.


    You do raise an excellent point that when offering advice to the general public one has to be careful. People will often misinterpret what you are trying to say. That, coupled with lack of proper outdoor skills/woodsmanship, they can get hurt.

  100. #100
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    Quote Originally Posted by bamwa View Post
    Sweet job kitejumper! Line that puppy with reflectix from home depot and that water will stay icy all ride and till morning.
    Excellent idea, might have to do that on version 2, keep the snacks cold too haha. I tried the id reel trick but it isn't secure enough, used one of those magnetic camelback clips to the bars though and that works well.

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