1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
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2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation: BantamSLK's Avatar
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    Does side matter? (Front axle quick release)

    Hey all, just snagged a new bike today (Salsa Big Mama), and while I was assembling it I realized that I didn't know which side the front quick release goes on. I originally thought that it should not be on the same size as the disc brakes, but on the non-brake side it's not snug against the fork (it sits parallel to the ground), while on the brake side it sits snug against the fork. I googled for pictures, and it seems to be split.

    So, on the front wheel, with disc brakes, which side should the quick release be on? Does it even matter? Am I overthinking this?

    Thanks.
    The Trail Bike: 2009 Salsa Big Mama

    The Race Bike: 2010 Niner Jet 9

  2. #2
    local jackass
    Reputation: biggoofy1's Avatar
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    no it doesnt matter but i try to keep all my QR's on the same side
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    2010 ALLEZ
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    2009 Cannondale Synapse 5
    Down East Cyclists

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by biggoofy1
    no it doesnt matter but i try to keep all my QR's on the same side
    I like it. Any reason to keep them on the same side? Or just OCD?

    Rear one is on the left side (to keep it away from the drivetrain), so front would go up there as well.
    The Trail Bike: 2009 Salsa Big Mama

    The Race Bike: 2010 Niner Jet 9

  4. #4
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    It doesn't matter. Some DH'ers put it on the opposite side of the rotor since they can get hot bombing hills.

  5. #5
    local jackass
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    OCD lol
    His
    2010 FSR XC
    2010 ALLEZ
    Hers
    2012 Myka 29'r
    2009 Cannondale Synapse 5
    Down East Cyclists

  6. #6
    Riding or Drumming
    Reputation: funkydrum's Avatar
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    Front on the R side where it can tucked behind the fork when closed.
    Tallboy
    Salsa El Mariachi SS
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  7. #7
    What could go wrong ...
    Reputation: Zoke2's Avatar
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    I run my front qr on the right so when I have to open it I dont burn myself on the rotor ... and yes it is parallel to the ground and it also protects my rebound knob in this position, but it makes no diff which side you use
    I used to ride to Win ... Now I ride to Grin

    While my guitar gently weeps, my bike sits there mocking me

  8. #8
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    +1 - spot on.
    "Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit." - And I agree.

  9. #9
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    It depedns...

    but generally for a rim brake bike the rear QR goes on the non-drive side as this keeps it clear of the derailleur etc. and allows easy access. for the front it goes on the non-drive side simply for looks. On a disc brake bike it's usually easier if you put in on the drive side. This serves to purposes, easy access and it keeps your hands away from a potentially HOT rotor. It doesn't take hairy downhill runs to get a rotor hot enough to burn you. And since it's the wheel that your most likely to remove when the ride is over while the rotor is still hot, it just makes sense. For the rear on a disc brake bike it's a toss up. If you can manage to get the qr into a position that works around the derailleurs and cables and such that's fine. If not then the brake side will work as well. On my fs bike the drive side is a no go, the design of the rear triangle and the way the derailleur sits, and the cable routing make it nearly impossible to close the qr properly. So the lever in on the brake side. I rarely remove the rear wheel after a ride, and since going tubeless I rarely have to remove a wheel during a ride. So I worry more about toasting my pinkies when pulling the front wheel to head home.

    Bottom line is, it isn't that big of a deal. As long as you can close the qr properly and are able to open it with little hassel it isn't an issue. Just let safety and ease of use be your guide.

    Good Dirt
    "I do whatever my Rice Cripsies tell me to!"

  10. #10
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    Not saying I'm a hundred percent correct but I was having trouble with disc rub on the front wheel no matter how tight I closed the quick release. Checked out the manual and it said you should keep the quick release on the opposite side of the rotor to help with this problem. Solved it. So something to keep in mind if your having that problem.

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