1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
Results 1 to 10 of 10
  1. #1
    teen mtber
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    does it matter what kind of mtb you have to mountain bike

    do you need shocks or a special kind of bike to mountain bike?

  2. #2
    sushi lover
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    you do not "need" anything -- it is entirely up to your own preference and budget

  3. #3
    teen mtber
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    thanks

  4. #4
    wannabe corporate shill
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    I did very well on a rigid Cannondale in the 90's. I now have a hardtail, and wouldn't neccesarily be opposed to going back to rigid (as my current trails are less rocky and am more laid back about my riding now).

    Your budget and riding style/interests will dictate what you get.

  5. #5
    Bike to the Bone...
    Reputation: rzozaya1969's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nfmtb
    do you need shocks or a special kind of bike to mountain bike?
    I think that while they are diferrent bike categories that marketing is throwing at us, and I believe there is a valid reason for it, I think the margins or boundaries between each is very blurry.

    I guess a lot is on how you like to ride, your budget, your experience and fitness. It would probably be very hard to go on a 50 mile ride on a downhill bike, or do hucks and jumps on a lightweight cross country bike. There are a lot of in between those two obvious extremes.

  6. #6
    Witty Title.
    Reputation: nordeaster's Avatar
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    It would be easier if you would tell the class "What does 'mountain biking' mean to you?"

    With that info, we could tell you what would be valuable to you for your style of riding. But anyway, if you're going to ride on dirt trails and want to get into riding regularly, I think the general consensus would to be to find a good local shop who can walk you through your options. Another consensus would be to not buy a bike at a department store... they can be dangerous, both poor quality bikes and worse quality assembly, and people who don't know jack about bikes.

    You may be OK at some sporting good stores (probably up to luck) and some outdoor stores (eg REI, EMS) may have bike-store quality sections that may be a good place to shop as well. Personally, I stick to my locally owned bike-only shops.

    Write in with what you'd like to ride and we'd be happy to offer some suggestions...
    --

    ~bc

    member, nemba.org

  7. #7
    teen mtber
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    i ussualy just ride in the urban area and at my grandfathers farm on the gravel roads and once in a while i hit the bushes.[trans canada trails

  8. #8
    teen mtber
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    my budget would range from 50 to 150 dollars. im 11 but turning 12 in july

  9. #9
    local trails rider
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    I think you need a second hand bike. And a pretty uncomplicated one too. At your age, you will grow out of a bike within a couple of years.
    ... Can you find a larger BMX bike or a cruiser? Those bikes apparently can take a beating. Some people prefer single speed bikes anyway. A rigid fork may slow you down a bit but it also makes you learn good bike handling.

  10. #10
    Collector of Scars
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    With your budget and age, I'd look for a large BMX style bike secondhand. That's gonna be about your only choice. The good news is this: the less suspension your bike has, the quicker your riding improves (generally). You have to learn REALLY QUICK how to pick a line so you don't get thrown from the bike, instead of relying on some new-fangled techno-invention.

    To answer your original question: just a bike. I've even seen a guy on the really easy trails with a road bike. Granted, he was having a hell of a time, and probably hating every second, but it can be done.

    Anyway, as has been said before, I'd check into a secondhand BMX or low-end MTB to start. When you grow, as your interest does, you can upgrade to nicer stuff. Right now, it doesn't make sense to dump a ton of money into a bike that you might get 1 or maybe 2 seasons out of.

    Just my opinion. Good luck!

    Ross
    "I don't wanna die without any scars. So come on, let's do it before I lose my nerve" - Tyler Durden (Fight Club, Chuck Palahniuk)

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