1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
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2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #1
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    Do I Need a Shock Pump?

    I recently bought a 2008 Specialized Rockhopper, front suspension only. Do I need a shock pump? I'm not exactly sure what they're used for. Thanks!

  2. #2
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    Shock pumps are for shocks that use air pressure as the spring. The base rockhopper uses the Dark 3 fork, which has a coil spring. No shock pump is needed.

    The Rockhopper comp which has a Tora 302, uses a coil spring and air, so you will need a shock pump.

    The Rockhopper pro has the Recon Race fork which I think also uses a coil spring and air.

  3. #3
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    I rode my RockShox Duke XC for 6 years before it ever saw a shock pump. If you get periodic tune-ups from your LBS, don't sweat it. Save your money for something more worthwhile. Shocks are mostly just bling anyway, although they will reduce arm and shoulder fatigue on REALLY long rides. If you race, you might shave a few seconds as well. Otherwise, they're just a tried and true way to part you from your money.

  4. #4
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    no need for a shock pump, unless you decide to replace your fork to one that needs it

  5. #5
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    Wouldn't a normal floor pump work as long as it could reach the maximum pressure?

    I have a Tora 318 SL air.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by tduro
    Shocks are mostly just bling anyway, although they will reduce arm and shoulder fatigue on REALLY long rides. If you race, you might shave a few seconds as well. Otherwise, they're just a tried and true way to part you from your money.
    Have you ever ridden a bike with good shocks?
    I've hit stuff on my bike that would most likely have snapped the frame or fork of a bike that was rigid.

    To the OP...........What fork is on your bike, and which model RH did you get?
    If it is indeed an air fork you should get a shock pump.
    Look, whatever happens, don't fight the mountain.

  7. #7
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    Yes, a floor pump will work

    ...BUT...

    shock pumps are designed to output high pressure in low volume increments. These smaller increments allow more precise and accurate control of the pressure you're using in the fork and fine-tuning the ride quality/spring rate is more repeatable when using a shock pump. If price is a concern when purchasing the pump, look here:http://www.pricepoint.com/detail/162...Shock-Pump.htm

    This is a nice product that I personally own that works well for both air-sprung forks and rear shocks. Before I purchased the shock pump, I went to an auto parts store and bought a schraeder valve extender and threaded it onto the air valve and used a floor pump. It worked fine, but is not the correct method.
    "What Would Doug Do?"

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by tduro
    I rode my RockShox Duke XC for 6 years before it ever saw a shock pump. If you get periodic tune-ups from your LBS, don't sweat it. Save your money for something more worthwhile. Shocks are mostly just bling anyway, although they will reduce arm and shoulder fatigue on REALLY long rides. If you race, you might shave a few seconds as well. Otherwise, they're just a tried and true way to part you from your money.
    I don't agree with your post. :-)
    When under pressure, your level of performance will sink to your level of preparation.


    Shorthills Cycling Club

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Langdog
    Before I purchased the shock pump, I went to an auto parts store and bought a schraeder valve extender and threaded it onto the air valve and used a floor pump. It worked fine, but is not the correct method.

    Funny, thats what I did to get my RS SID pumped up before I had a shock pump. Bought a 4 pack of the chrome valve extenders for $2.....= )
    Look, whatever happens, don't fight the mountain.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by savagemann
    Funny, thats what I did to get my RS SID pumped up before I had a shock pump. Bought a 4 pack of the chrome valve extenders for $2.....= )
    I guess great minds think alike...but I do have a shock pump now.
    "What Would Doug Do?"

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