1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #26
    Picture Unrelated
    Reputation: zebrahum's Avatar
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    Jun 2005
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    Maybe everyone is a little harsh on not spending money on your 4300, but it is very true that you shouldn't bother putting disc brakes on it. I have the good fortune to be able to have several bikes and I have two disc brake bikes, one V brake bike, and one cantilever bike (also a coaster brake bike and a fixie but those are out of this conversation) and I can say that there is little benefit to gain from switching to V brakes for no good reason. You can set up your V brakes with probably something like 90% (did you know that 95% of statistics are made up?) of the power of a disc brake in normal conditions. Putting a Kool Stop pad on, making sure they're aligned properly, and having cables and housing and brake noodle in good working order will help you keep your braking power at its best.

    Just because everyone is saying that you shouldn't put a ton of money into your bike doesn't mean that your bike is worthless. Keep your bike running well, put money into it as needed, and ride the crap out of it but don't get sucked into thinking that you can make it something it's not. You're running a solid beginner bike, nothing wrong with that. If at some point you decide that your 4300 isn't meeting your needs on the trail, that's when you start thinking about upgrading to a different bike. Until then, put money into your bike when it's not working well but don't put money into it unless you know exactly what you're trying to get out of that money.
    Don't you hate it when a sentence doesn't end the way you think it octopus?

  2. #27
    mtbr member
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    Apr 2009
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    468
    I completely upgraded a 4300 including a Tora fork. It for sure wasn't worth it. I outgrew the bike quickly and there was no way to get the money out of it I spent on it when I sold it. Ride it and save for what you want next.

  3. #28
    Anti-elitist
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    Sep 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by shockfinder View Post
    I completely upgraded a 4300 including a Tora fork. It for sure wasn't worth it. I outgrew the bike quickly and there was no way to get the money out of it I spent on it when I sold it. Ride it and save for what you want next.
    Tora?! Now that's a horror story.
    Someone said this to me: "Don't upgrade your bike. You'll have paid enough to buy a good bike but you won't have one." I paraphrase.
    Point is, just keep it running. No doubt you have outgrown it. But if you upgraded every part of the bike you have outgrown, you would be shockfinder.
    But you've already made up your mind. This is just for anybody who feels like their starter bike aint good enough.
    It's pronounced "so pro and cool."
    It was an impulse decision.

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