1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #1
    mtbr member
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    Disc Brake Question?

    How long will they last till you need to replace them ? I am very new to MTB so forgive the question. Also I heard that if you remove the tire and accidently squeeze the brakes it will lock them and require servicing at a dealer. Is this true or can I unlock them myself... Thanks again

    Muskratt

  2. #2
    I post too much.
    Reputation: snaky69's Avatar
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    The lever squeezing problem is only for hydraulic disc brakes, if you have mechanical disc brakes then this isn't a problem at all. And yes, you can easily re-set them yourself using a flat head screwdriver and prying the pads apart very slowly and carefully so as to not break anything.

    How long do they last? It all depends on your use, I know some guys that use them for 2-3 seasons in a row, and some that burn through them in 2-3 months. There is no sure way to tell you how long they'll last.

  3. #3
    too tired to be clever
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    I saw from the other thread you are getting a Trek Hardtail. I'm not familiar with the model you are getting, but I started a couple years ago with a cheaper Trek hardtail with mechanical disk brakes.

    I weigh about 200 and I went through brake pads about every 500 miles on that bike. On my newer bike I have hydraulic disk brakes (and more skill) and the pads are still good at the 500 mile mark.

    The first response to your question covers the question of closing the brakes with the wheel removed. My newer bike came with a plastic wedge to push apart the pads. A knife blade or a small screwdriver would work just as well, I think.

  4. #4
    Still learning
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    It also depends on the pad compound you use. If you use a metal pad with, say, titanium rotors, you'll screw the rotors up pretty bad pretty quickly.

    For racing I run black pads on XTR rotors, which will wear through much quicker than what I use for practice/training - green pads on Avid G2 rotors.
    In the wet however, I'm well aware that a single enduro could wear through an entire set of blacks.
    Reds and golds I don't really use, though there is the trick of using a black on one side and a gold on the other side for better performance - these will of course wear at different rates.

    As for being told they needed servicing at a dealer if they were pushed in, who told you this? A dealer hoping to make more business? Most multitools will have a flat lever, or a stanley screwdriver will do the trick (just be careful not to damage the pads).

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