1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
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2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1
    mtbr member
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    Differences in stems?

    Can someone tell me the differences in the degrees of the angles of stems??My stock one is 8 degrees. Would a higher degree help me in downhills?

  2. #2
    Hoosier
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    Possibly

    The degree determine how much the stem rises. 0 degree stems are flat. With a larger rise you wouldn't lean over so far and that would help diminish that going over the bars feeling. A riser bar or shorter stem would have similar effects. Your lbs should allow you to try different combinations on your current bike to see what feels best.
    SS is like beer...its an acquired taste.

  3. #3
    OnTheTrailAgain
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    Quote Originally Posted by Keatan
    0 degree stems are flat.
    "Flat" meaning horizontal to level ground?

    Also, what are the differences in lengh?

    How is is measured? (mm?)

    What's considered a long stem?


  4. #4
    OnTheTrailAgain
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    Found it... -17 degree stem.

    Anybody riding anything like this?



    Stem angle is one of the factors that determines handlebar height.
    A listed angle of 0 degrees actually provides a rise of 16-20 degrees, depending on the bike's head-tube angle.
    Flexible, athletic riders prefer lower-rise stems, while recreational riders usually favor higher-rise stems.

    Stem length is measured along the side of the stem from the center of the steerer to the center of the handlebar clamp (see diagram).
    Keep in mind that as a stem provides more rise, its effective length decreases.
    In the example above, if the +17-degree stem measures 135 mm, it actually extends 108 mm parallel to the ground.

    http://wheelandsprocket.com/itemdeta...features=14732

    __________________________________________________ __________________________________________________ _______

    Today, I see speed riders with long low stems.

    Now, on to stem "length"...what's considered long?

    Does proximety/relation to hub distance from handbars matter?

    I ask because when I used to BMX, I see most racers have their bars straight up inline with thier fork, but trick riders with their bars tilted forward.
    Last edited by 2ndgen; 07-29-2008 at 05:04 PM.

  5. #5
    What's "social pace?"
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    the negative angle stems usually go on roadies.

  6. #6
    OnTheTrailAgain
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    That's how I'm going to build up my street MTB.


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