1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #1
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    Did I get a good deal? 08 SC Blur XC

    Hey everyone,
    New to biking but decided I wanted a low-impact training alternative to supplement my regular running/calisthenics workouts. Leaving for the Navy in a year or two while I finish school so I wanted an XC bike that I could grow into and possibly use for an XC race or two.

    Drove out to meet someone off Craigslist, selling their 2008 Santa Cruz Blur XC. A bit beat up but I think I got a decent deal for $800. What worries me is that i've been reading on the durability of aluminum frames and the guy I bought it from is on a bike team and mentioned that he likes to do jumps. So im assuming he's ridden it pretty hard for about 4 years. And there are some small chips about 2mm deep, in addition to lots of scratches on the underside. But the upside is that the bikes been tuned and he just replaced the bearings.

    Specs listed below, all in moderate condition. I dont care much about the durability of the components so much as the frame. I've checked for stress fractures and its in good shape aside from heavy wear near chainstay and on the bottom of bike. I want to drop more money to upgrade this bike with new wheelset and tires but I dont know. I will also need to buy a bearing press tool ($85) if I am to replace bearings in the future. Will also want to buy a back-up derailuer hanger ($30) just in case.

    Rear and Front Derailleur - Shimano Deore XT
    Shifters - Shimano Deore
    Brakes - Juicy Three SL
    Front Shock - Rock Shox Recon SL S-lite
    Rear Shock - Fox Float RP 23
    Head Set - Cane Creek S-8 ($30 on ebay)
    Saddle - Fizik Vitesse
    Wheels - DT - Swiss 445D
    Tires - Michelin MT Dry 2

    Did I get a good deal? 08 SC Blur XC-dsc_0518.jpgDid I get a good deal? 08 SC Blur XC-dsc_0517.jpgDid I get a good deal? 08 SC Blur XC-dsc_0516.jpgDid I get a good deal? 08 SC Blur XC-dsc_0514.jpgDid I get a good deal? 08 SC Blur XC-dsc_0513.jpgDid I get a good deal? 08 SC Blur XC-dsc_0512.jpg

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    You have the bike. If you got ripped off, it's a little late.

    While new wheels are one of the less pointless upgrades one can make on a mountain bike, they make a very minor difference. You may not even be able to feel it - you already have pretty nice wheels. Take care of them and ride them until they're too chewed to keep riding.

    Damage all looks cosmetic. If it were my bike, I might wrap the fork crown in electrical tape so it doesn't get any worse.

    Now that you have the bike, dial it in for you and go ride the hell out of it.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  3. #3
    IoC
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    Prior reply summed it up nicely, just had a bit to add as someone who's owned aluminum blurs for a long time:

    You may not want to get the bearing press. If you get to where you can pull the axles, grease them, and torque them back in, the bearings will last a long while. Getting one replacement set installed wouldn't be that much more than buying the tools to do it right.

    If you get a creak/squeak from the suspension that persists, the DU bushing on the shock is probably worn. A shop can replace it with a new nylon-based Fox model for pretty cheap, and it'll last longer than the metallic ones that shipped on these.

    Definitely buy a spare hanger.

    If you -really- want a VPP1 bearing press, PM me and I'll sell you mine cheap. My Santa Cruz stuff is VPP2 now, so I don't need it anymore.

  4. #4
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    Thanks for the responses! Just waiting for some platform pedals to arrive so I can see what this bike is all about and whether it'll need anything replaced or greased.

  5. #5
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    from the pics, it looks like fairly typical wear from use, maybe in a rocky environment, but it doesn't look like abuse to me.

    The rotors look ginormous for an xc bike, though. That fork model you have was OEM on a Specialized...probably an FSRxc. It was a model that RockShox made specifically for Specialized so I'm having some difficulty finding a manual for it. Current Recon forks have a max rotor size of 210mm. I'm trying to see if the one you have there is any different. I can't find ANYTHING about this fork so I'd go with the current specs on the Recon, I guess.

    fwiw, big rotors on a light bike like that (esp with a light rider) will feel pretty grabby and lack modulation. smaller rotors will give more modulation. for exclusively xc terrain/riding without much downhill, I'd go with 160mm rotors front and rear. for situations with more downhill where you want a little more power and resistance to fade on longer dh rides, I'd go with 180mm front and 160mm rear. for more aggressive AM type stuff, I'd go 180mm front and rear. this would be for myself. I'm about 175lb and dropping.

    if you think the braking is fine, then no worries about changing rotors, as it seems that the fork specs for this fork are probably not exceeded.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by NateHawk View Post
    from the pics, it looks like fairly typical wear from use, maybe in a rocky environment, but it doesn't look like abuse to me.

    The rotors look ginormous for an xc bike, though. That fork model you have was OEM on a Specialized...probably an FSRxc. It was a model that RockShox made specifically for Specialized so I'm having some difficulty finding a manual for it. Current Recon forks have a max rotor size of 210mm. I'm trying to see if the one you have there is any different. I can't find ANYTHING about this fork so I'd go with the current specs on the Recon, I guess.

    fwiw, big rotors on a light bike like that (esp with a light rider) will feel pretty grabby and lack modulation. smaller rotors will give more modulation. for exclusively xc terrain/riding without much downhill, I'd go with 160mm rotors front and rear. for situations with more downhill where you want a little more power and resistance to fade on longer dh rides, I'd go with 180mm front and 160mm rear. for more aggressive AM type stuff, I'd go 180mm front and rear. this would be for myself. I'm about 175lb and dropping.

    if you think the braking is fine, then no worries about changing rotors, as it seems that the fork specs for this fork are probably not exceeded.
    Good to know! You're right the rotors are pretty big. Surprised you could tell from just looking at these pics - front ones are about 200mm and the rear is about 180-190mm. I weigh about 145 so after I ride it for a while ill decide how I feel.

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