1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
Results 1 to 21 of 21
  1. #1
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    Diamondback Response Comp to a TREK 6000

    I purchased a used Diamondback in the spring from the LBS and the young guy who was helping me said, "Yep, it fits". I am 6'2 and weigh in at 245 pounds. I really like the looks of the bike and thought that it was good to buy a used bike just to make sure that biking was going to be something I enjoy. I kept looking more into the forum and frame sizing and came to realize that my bike is only an 18" frame when I measured it. I love biking and now am planning to go as far as planning trips just to ride my bike on trails in B.C.. I do feel a little cramped on the bike I have. The seat is all the way back and at time still feel I do not have enough room. I talked with the LBS where I purchased the bike from, not mentioning I purchased a used bike from them 3 months prior, and he told me a 19.5" frame would be what I needed. He offered me to take a look at a Trek 6000, 2011 model. I sat on it and what a difference. He let me know that the bike would be on sale September 12 for $800. He said that he could take my used bike back, but since it is the end of season and the sale price of the Trek that I probably would not get all my money back for the used Diamondback. I think I will go for the new bike and keep the Diamondback and attempt to sell it in the spring. I hope my upgrade will be worthwhile.

    -Shawn

  2. #2
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    I have a friend with a 6000 and he has tortured that bike and it has held up really well. Over time, he has done some upgrades, but even before those, the bike served him well.

  3. #3
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    yeah 18 def isnt the right size for you.. im 5'11 and probably can ride 20's but the smaller size feels ok to me.. at 6'2 your right on the boarder of large or xl so you could be two sizes off...
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  4. #4
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    It did make me feel ill when the tape measure read 18". I tried to imagine it read 20 inches, but that did not work. At least it was just a used purchase and not a lot of money was invested. It really bugged me whenever I rode the bike. Just knowing I was riding a bike that was too small for me. I believe that the 19.5" frame will work for me, the LBS says it will, or am I wrong?

    -Shawn

  5. #5
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    19.5 should be a far better fit for you... really the only way to truly tell is to ride it, but I'd predict that will be a far better fit. You're pretty tall, an 18" is more of a medium frame. You probably need in the large/xlarge range. I'm 5'6" and riding an 18" GT Peace for commuting. I probably wouldn't use it for tricky technical mtn biking, but you get the picture.

  6. #6
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    If you're going to wait on the new bike anyway, here's an experiment - try a longer stem. Just go up a size. See what you think. You can also try flipping the stem or putting it at the bottom of the spacer stack.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  7. #7
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    ^^AndrwSwitch gives good advice...

  8. #8
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    Thanks for the input guys. The thought did cross my mind to put another stem on it as well as some hi-rise handle bars. Then I thought that would be an added expense if the frame was too small, although maybe just changing the stem would be a cheap temporary fix untill I get my bike in a few weeks.

    -Shawn

  9. #9
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    Putting riser bars on your bike will give you less room, not more.

    That doesn't necessarily make it the wrong thing to do to "save" this bike, although it's a little expensive if you're set on a new bike.

    So I'm a little confused about the problem - earlier you said that you felt cramped. The things I suggested in #6 will buy you more room in the cockpit.

    Often, people on too small a bike can't get the handlebars high enough for comfort. There's plenty of adjustability saddle height, but not so much with the bars. So in a sense, the bike can ride too small and too big at the same time. Really what's going on is that reach and drop are two different things, even though when they're both close-ish to right, changing either can accomplish similar results. Anyway, someone on too small a bike who had too short a reach and too much saddle-bars drop would want riser bars and a longer stem, even though for someone who's already close to right, those are opposite tweaks.

    So what's going on here? Can you post a picture of the bike? Needs to be your bike, and set up as you ride it now. No "this is the model I ride" or "this is it six months ago, but I changed a bunch of things and really I have a totally different bike."
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  10. #10
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    Something new learned again. I thought that a hi - rise bar would help me with the problem. I will take a picture of it and post here tomorrow so you see how it is set up. Heck, maybe even later tonight. Still lots to learn. Thanks for helping me.

    -Shawn

  11. #11
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    I hope this picture helps. Thanks for taking the time for me.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Diamondback Response Comp to a TREK 6000-08-diamondback-response-comp-001.jpg  


  12. #12
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    Here is another
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Diamondback Response Comp to a TREK 6000-08-diamondback-response-comp-004.jpg  


  13. #13
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    Shooting in front of a garage door like that was a great choice - good reference to horizontal.

    That saddle-bars drop looks pretty reasonable to my eye. It's a preference thing, of course, so not everyone will agree with me. But I think it's at least in the ballpark. Sometimes people post bikes with sky-high saddles and I think, "WTF?? There's no way that person's happy."

    It looks like your stem has a little rise, and it's more-or-less in the middle of its spacer stack. So try moving it up and down in the spacer stack, and try flipping the stem. You may or may not find a position you like, but I think you'll get a sense of what direction you'd like to go in.

    When you reshuffle that stuff, you'll screw up your headset's adjustment. No biggie.

    Park Tool Co. ParkTool Blog Threadless Headset Service

    Scroll most of the way down to the section titled "headset service."
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  14. #14
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    btw the stems they put on response's stock are like 60mm am stems lol.. you could get a longer stem... its still too small for you anyways tho
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  15. #15
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    Looks like you bent a saddle rail.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  16. #16
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    Well, I might as well play with it. Thanks so much for your advice, I will use it and let you know the outcome. I would still like to keep this one to, since from the pic's you can see it pulls one of those Mountain Trains behind it. Why scratch the seatpost on the new bike. HAHA!

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndrwSwitch View Post
    Looks like you bent a saddle rail.
    I noticed that after I installed the Mountain Train hitch to my seatpost. Time to lose some weight!! I need titanium rails for a seat. I had a WTB seat on their before and never noticed a problem. Different brands, maybe less quality. I put an Allay saddle on, not that long ago and never again. I've lost 15 pounds since April and have a ways to go.

    -Shawn

  18. #18
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    with your height and weight, you'd be happier with a 29er.
    cas im diggin a ditch where madness gives a bit.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by sdh792 View Post
    I noticed that after I installed the Mountain Train hitch to my seatpost. Time to lose some weight!! I need titanium rails for a seat. I had a WTB seat on their before and never noticed a problem. Different brands, maybe less quality. I put an Allay saddle on, not that long ago and never again. I've lost 15 pounds since April and have a ways to go.

    -Shawn
    Usually saddle rails made from substances with better strength/weight ratios are weaker - it's a choice made by a company trying to make a lighter product. They assume I'll be putting my dainty 155 lb ass on it every now and then, and posting for rough parts of the trail. Some of these things even have posted weight limits.

    Stick with steel. Better strength by volume, and usually the design doesn't make any compromises around strength.

    One of my teammates broke my other teammates carbon fiber saddle rail recently. I saw it happen - she came off his pedal and sat down hard. That was it. He bought the saddle retail and shouldn't have trouble replacing it. But imagine doing that at the far end of a loop. We were really only about two miles from the parking lot at the time.

    I was really bummed out when I killed the magnesium rails on my favorite saddle. I had two of them. They were made in the late '90s, and while I'm sure there's another saddle out there that I'll like as much, I don't want to go to the trouble of finding it. I have a saved search going on EBay, and sooner or later I'll either get more of "my" saddle or I'll run across another one that I like as much.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by antgrave View Post
    with your height and weight, you'd be happier with a 29er.
    That thought crossed my mind to. The only thing that I know about the 29er is that it is smoother riding and the size should handle a bigger guy like myself. I better do some more researching tonight.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by sdh792 View Post
    That thought crossed my mind to. The only thing that I know about the 29er is that it is smoother riding and the size should handle a bigger guy like myself. I better do some more researching tonight.
    you should. i owned a Redline Monocog 29er then bought a Jamis Durango 2 26'' bike...i'm 6'1 - 230..after switching back to the 26, it was hard to handle and hard to carry me as well as the 29er...also it felt like a kids toy compared to the 29er..so i ditched it and bought a Giant Talon 1...just try a 29er out and there is no way you'd want to get ride of it at your size.
    cas im diggin a ditch where madness gives a bit.

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