1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
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2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #1
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    Diamondback or a real bike?

    So I listen to this forum not to buy a bike from the big box (see posting). So I purchased a Diamondback at Sports only to see them now on Costco! Man this is bad, when I called Costco they said I could return, and the service rep said you can get them anywhere. So Walmart is next? Any thoughts? So stay away from Sports Authority and Performance? Please help me in selecting a non big box bike! Thoughts - need help!

  2. #2
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    Why not go to a real bike shop? We don't know what kind of bike you want...
    Yeti SB-66 Carbon

  3. #3
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    ^^^ exectly. Why not a real bike shop? Is there something wrong with real bike shops or big name bikes?
    "Ideal bikes are not bought, they evolve beneath you"

  4. #4
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    Re: Diamondback or a real bike?

    There are decent diamond backs. There are also very low end entry level diamond backs. If you're looking for serious advice, post the model, component specs and you'll get a relatively objective assessment of the limitations of the bike.

    You can't get a good bike for good value by focussing on broad generalizations like brand/store/etc. You gotta do the hard work: research the parts, how they rank, what they cost, frame construction, geometry, etc.
    ------------------------------------------------
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  5. #5
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    Diamondback or a real bike?

    I don't think there's anything wrong with a Diamondback if you ride it and like it. I bought my wife one, it's got some lower end parts and is heavy, but more than capable for the trails she rides. If the bike you purchased was in your price range, accommodates your riding level, and you enjoy it... Why return it?

  6. #6
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    hard09712 Here's your explanation... I've been a master bike tech for 20 years. I am currently a regional trainer for Sports Authority. But I have been to "bike school", and I've also been a lead tech at LBS's during my time in the industry. I just chose to go with a company that allowed me to do more teaching than repairing, and they also offered a better comp package and insurance. I learn something new all of the time like a good tech should. But I promise you, I'm just as skilled as 90% of techs out there, and at least 50% of the bikes that come into my shops were purchased from an LBS. Why? Because it's cheaper. Ok enough about me and my background. Just want to make sure you know I'm not some 16 year old reading Mountain Bike Action and spewing a bunch of jibberish I read in magazines...

    Diamondback is owned by Raleigh which has been around since 1887 and is one of the oldest bicycle companies in the world. DB has been around for about 36 years(just as long as Specialized & Trek). But they are not a "boutique" brand. Meaning you can find them at both LBS and some reputable big box retailers. They manufacture bikes from around $199-$11,000. Specialized and Trek do the same. However, they want to be associated strictly with an LBS environment. Don't discount the bike because it wasn't purchased at a "shop", or because you saw Costco selling them. When you compare apples to apples, you will find a DB bike at $600 has the same component package as another big name bike priced around $600. Same goes for a bike that cost $5000... They offer the same type of warranties as the big names, and they're all purchasing aluminum and carbon frames from big manufacturers in China. So what's wrong with them? Because you saw a DB bike at Costco?

    I bought a Overdrive Carbon Pro 29er yesterday. I can't tell you how impressed I was while building that bike, and riding it around. Don't worry, you won't see it at Costco or Sports Authority either...
    Bike Doctor



  7. #7
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    Ride the bike. I had the same opinion on bikes from box stores, LBS always seems off the hook price wise. I did mull over the diamondbacks for quite a while, but often thought about after sale service, from the same guys who couldn't properly size my daughter for a softball helmet. I ended up buying used off craigslist. You got the bike, ride it, get a sticker and cover up the name, its not always psychological, but at that price range they are likely all the same. Typically the components is what makes it more expensive. If you,re just riding trails or pavement, ride it. Good luck.

  8. #8
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    Re: Diamondback or a real bike?

    http://twentynineinches.com/2011/10/...-final-review/

    This review for the sortie black has nothing but good things to say about the sortie line save for the weight (due to the frame). DB makes a good bike they just weigh a bit more than their competitors. I have considered some of their higher end offerings myself, the only thing which stops me is how the perceived value of DB will negatively affect the resale value.
    Here is the thing about equality, everyone's equal when they're dead. - Gavroche, Les MisÚrables

  9. #9
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    It's like buying beer guys... Sam Adams is considered a "craft/specialty" beer vs. stuff like Bud Light or Coors Light. Does that mean you won't buy Sam Adams because it's sold at liquor stores as well as Wal Mart, 7-11, and nearly every gas station? HAHA

    bigkat does bring up a good point.. The one drawback is the perceived value/name could be skewed if you decided to sell the bike because it is seen at big box stores.
    Bike Doctor



  10. #10
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    If you start riding more fun/difficult trails with bumps, rocks, roots and some downhill speed the fork becomes important for comfort and control. Many lower cost bikes(and even some $1k bikes from Spec) come with Suntour XCM or other 'X' series forks. Suntour designed these for a limited purpose.-----
    RTR: Recreational trail
    Work out with your buddies: No rough terrain, no steep climbs or downhills!
    Just floating along the city river or through the forest behind your house.

    This means bike path only. Take them on trails and they pogo and noodle.

    XCR forks for 2014 come with air models and 32mm instead of 28mm stanchions.

  11. #11
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    Diamondback bike can be purchased at REI too. They probably make a lot of money selling BSOs (bicycle-shaped objects) at bigger stores but they still sell some legit bikes.

    As for Sports Authority, the comment above makes me feel better that they are hiring industry-savvy people. I have perused SA bikes before and was embarrassed to see bikes with brake pads that don't touch the rim and front derailleurs that are a full inch too high. it seems that the bicycle assemblers are just slapping them together as quickly as possible with no regard for QC. I hope that changes in the future, not only for that company, but for cycling in general. I wonder how many people give up on cycling every year because the "nice" bike they bought at a sporting goods store never shifts right because some dingbat who assembled it does not know how a front derailleur works.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by hard09712 View Post
    So I listen to this forum not to buy a bike from the big box
    Problem number one right there. Don't blindly follow anything you read on an internet forum. Read the responses, apply some critical thinking, and make a determination about which ones actually make sense and apply to you.

    I rode many years and many miles on a rigid Murray from Wal-Mart. Other than damaging the wheels a few times in crashes, it worked great and needed nothing. That was before the internet, so fortunately I didn't know that I was riding a worthless piece of crap.

  13. #13
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    I bought a DB at Dick's Sporting Goods. It was a very decent bike for the money. The bike tech was as good as any I've ever met. When I broke things through hard use, they fixed it under the warranty.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by mack_turtle View Post
    Diamondback bike can be purchased at REI too. They probably make a lot of money selling BSOs (bicycle-shaped objects) at bigger stores but they still sell some legit bikes.

    As for Sports Authority, the comment above makes me feel better that they are hiring industry-savvy people. I have perused SA bikes before and was embarrassed to see bikes with brake pads that don't touch the rim and front derailleurs that are a full inch too high. it seems that the bicycle assemblers are just slapping them together as quickly as possible with no regard for QC. I hope that changes in the future, not only for that company, but for cycling in general. I wonder how many people give up on cycling every year because the "nice" bike they bought at a sporting goods store never shifts right because some dingbat who assembled it does not know how a front derailleur works.
    Whoa--Whoa--Whoa!! Slow down mack... Don't go crazy and think bikes are going to be built correctly. LOL That is the NUMBER 1 problem with bikes in general(especially big box retailers). It's something I fight every day! Even when I was at the LBS. Bike assembly is one of those double edged swords at best. Assemblers are paid by the piece... So even those with bike building skills will cut corners to get as many bikes on the floor as possible. The thought is that "someone" is going to do a pre-sale check of the bike and make sure everything is 100% safe and ready to ride when it leaves the shop/store. So making sure the bike is 100% ready is not a primary concern. Have you ever walked into an LBS and they didn't want to check the bike even before a test ride? No. When bikes come out of the box they are usually about 80% ready to go and you only install the bars, front wheel, pedals, and air up the tires. Sometimes bikes are 99% tuned and ready out of the box(after proper assembly), sometimes they are a mess(and 50% of those assemblers won't/don't) take the time to fix them before they hit the floor because that slows them down and they can't build 4 bikes an hour.

    But what you're saying is 100% accurate! When I walk into a store/shop and see something completely backwards or badly messed up? I'm thinking who the heck built that!?!? It's a constant struggle. Most places use an 3rd party service because the labor costs to use an hourly employee to do nothing but build bikes all day would be horrific.
    Bike Doctor



  15. #15
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    Are we talking about actual mountain biking here, or some kind of weird frigging bike pageantry? Who gives a damn where you bought the bike or what stickers are on it if it works for you? Just go ride the thing.

  16. #16
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    When I called Diamondback they told me to get the bike built and checked over. Not cool with this, also I prefer not to spend a few hundred dollars to see my Diamondback at Costco or Walmart. I'm going to a Specialized or Fuji Shop today... Wish me luck!

  17. #17
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    Good luck.
    "I love the bike. It's my meditation. I think I'm bike-sexual." -Robin Williams

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by hard09712 View Post
    When I called Diamondback they told me to get the bike built and checked over. Not cool with this, also I prefer not to spend a few hundred dollars to see my Diamondback at Costco or Walmart. I'm going to a Specialized or Fuji Shop today... Wish me luck!

    Exactly what bike were you looking at? I am not aware of Diamondbacks at Wal Mart... And the bikes for sale at Costco are like $269.00 the very entry level hybrids and comfort bikes. They weren't even mountain bikes. If you're going to an LBS to look at Fuji and Spec wanting to spend less than $299, you are going to need more than luck. You are going to need a handgun. LMAO!
    Bike Doctor



  19. #19
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    Diamondback or a real bike?

    Quote Originally Posted by hard09712 View Post
    So I listen to this forum not to buy a bike from the big box (see posting). So I purchased a Diamondback at Sports only to see them now on Costco! Man this is bad, when I called Costco they said I could return, and the service rep said you can get them anywhere. So Walmart is next? Any thoughts? So stay away from Sports Authority and Performance? Please help me in selecting a non big box bike! Thoughts - need help!
    Why would Costco let you return a bike you bought at Sports Authority?



    Quote Originally Posted by hard09712 View Post
    When I called Diamondback they told me to get the bike built and checked over. Not cool with this, also I prefer not to spend a few hundred dollars to see my Diamondback at Costco or Walmart. I'm going to a Specialized or Fuji Shop today... Wish me luck!
    A reputable bicycle retailer will not sell you an unassembled bike in a box. Even then, a decent bike is still a decent bike no matter where it is sold, as long as it is assembled correctly.
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  20. #20
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    I've seen Cannondales at our local Costco. Not super high end bikes, but pretty decent ones. The thing about Costco is that their business model is extremely different from other retail stores - they buy huge lots of whatever a particular vender sells them for cheap. That's why their inventory is always changing (except Kirkland stuff). And they do get some pretty quality stuff - even bikes. The problem is, of course, that they are not a bike shop so if you buy a bike from there you're on your own to get it set up and adjusted properly, as well as follow on maintenance.
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  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blackhawks01 View Post
    Diamondback is owned by Raleigh which has been around since 1887 and is one of the oldest bicycle companies in the world. DB has been around for about 36 years(just as long as Specialized & Trek). But they are not a "boutique" brand. Meaning you can find them at both LBS and some reputable big box retailers. They manufacture bikes from around $199-$11,000. Specialized and Trek do the same. However, they want to be associated strictly with an LBS environment. Don't discount the bike because it wasn't purchased at a "shop", or because you saw Costco selling them. When you compare apples to apples, you will find a DB bike at $600 has the same component package as another big name bike priced around $600. Same goes for a bike that cost $5000... They offer the same type of warranties as the big names, and they're all purchasing aluminum and carbon frames from big manufacturers in China. So what's wrong with them? Because you saw a DB bike at Costco?
    Sorry, your mistaken about Raleigh. Raleigh is one of the oldest bicycle brands in the world (I believe Bianchi is the oldest), but Raleigh the bicycle company was bought out in the 80's and has been bought and sold several times since. Sort of like what happened to Schwinn. The only thing that's been around since 1887 is the name and the headbadge. And Raleigh doesn't own Diamondback. In the 90's Derby Corp. bought both and merged them together. Now they are both owned by Accell, one of the largest sporting goods companies in the world.
    Surly Cross Check: fat tire roadie
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  22. #22
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    Trek X-Caliber 4 would be a good beginners bike.
    Big Wheels Keep On Rolling

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  23. #23
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    I kind of mentioned this in another thread, so sorry for repeating.

    But I was originally really interested in getting a Diamondback because I thought it'd be a cheap option to buy a decent new bike. I was willing to accept that it wasn't one of the best known brands but it would be enough for me.

    When I was looking into it, I read somewhere that Diamondback cheapened it's name a while back by selling to big box stores too. (I might have this confused with another brand).

    But since I didn't know how committed I would be in this, potential resale value mattered and it might be harder selling a Diamondback bike.

    One of the reasons is that the prices for Diamondback fluctuates a lot. At least for the base models. For example, Amazon sells Diamondback bikes and it looks like they discounted it a lot last November, so I'm not sure if they'll follow the same cycle this year. Although people do complain about how the packages were shipped. So there were two concerns, one is I didn't want to buy a bike and find out it was a lot cheaper a month or two later. The other is if they're willing to discount it that much, I wonder how much is it really worth it in the first place.

    Fujis and GTs make both high and low end bikes. We were at a lbs shop just to check out what they had, and they had a 2013 Fuji Absolute 2.3 (or 3.2) for $299. When we got home to check the prices, Performance had a 2014 for $269. True it's a hybrid and very basic, but it's possible to buy a new bike for under $299. You just might not get much with it.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by bolandjd View Post
    Sorry, your mistaken about Raleigh. Raleigh is one of the oldest bicycle brands in the world (I believe Bianchi is the oldest), but Raleigh the bicycle company was bought out in the 80's and has been bought and sold several times since. Sort of like what happened to Schwinn. The only thing that's been around since 1887 is the name and the headbadge. And Raleigh doesn't own Diamondback. In the 90's Derby Corp. bought both and merged them together. Now they are both owned by Accell, one of the largest sporting goods companies in the world.
    It doesn't matter if Raleigh was bought by someone else. Bianchi was sold in the 90's too, so that is also just a head badge. The fact of the matter is the name has been around since 1887. Bianchi since 1885. Yes, Accell is the larger parent company and aquired Raleigh/Diamondback in 2012. They also own SBS, Lapierre, Redline, and Torker. When I order warranty parts from Diamondback? I get Raleigh & Diamondback. But not any of the other companies under that umbrella. Just sayin...
    Bike Doctor



  25. #25
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    Well I for one am very happy with my DB sortie. I love that some people look down on the DB name. It allowed me to buy the frame, fox fork, and some other bits used off ebay for cheaper than I would have paid just for the frame alone from somebody like specialized/trek/whatever bigger name. I gained 2lbs over my old Gary Fisher 29er but I also gained a hell of a lot better riding bike. I also think it looks pretty too .

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