1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Sleevem1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
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    217

    couple questions on replacement brake pads for Avid Elixir 7

    I'm about to get my new bike soon which comes with Avid Elixir 7 brakes. What type of replacement pads should i get when the original ones wear out? Do they make aftermarket ones or should i go with the Avid ones? I was researching them on jensena but I'm confused on what brand to get and metallic vs aluminum.

  2. #2
    Fat-tired Roadie
    Reputation: AndrwSwitch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
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    12,376
    I don't know what kind of pads you should get. I'm not you. But I might be able to shed a little light on your options.

    Avid offers their pads with two compounds and two backing materials. The pads can be organic or metallic, and the back plate can be aluminum or something cheaper, probably steel.

    Organic pads are a bit grabbier. Metallic pads are less grabby, and they're reputed to have less fade and fewer problems with wet conditions. I found the organic pads to take a very light touch, and I like my current, metallic pads better.

    Switching to aluminum back plates saves weight. IMHO, it's an insignificant amount, and a silly place to spend money. Up to you.

    As far as aftermarket pads are concerned, I don't believe they perform any better and I don't think I save enough money. So I just go with Avid.

    It seems to take me about a season to wear out a set of brake pads. This isn't something you need to worry about right away. Ride your bike, decide if you like to have that kind of stopping power or a little mellower initiation, and keep your eyes out for a good deal.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

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