1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
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2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #1
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    A Couple Noob Questions About My New Bike...

    Hey everyone... I was hoping you could shed some light on a couple of concerns I have with my Trek 6500...

    (1) I'm riding 50% street, 25% hard packed dirt, 25% mountain trails. What should my tire pressure be at in each of these situations? Or should it just stay the same throughout?

    (2) I can't seem to shift into the large spoked wheel on the crank (I'm sure there is a proper name for this but I'm new to all of this). The LBS makes adjustments and they work fine when the bike is up on the stand. However, whenever I get on it and start shifting it's a real pain to shift into that large wheel. In order to do so I have to push the left shifter all the way out, I mean totally hyper-extended... (A) Is this just a matter of breaking in the bike and this will go away. (B) Is this to be expected with a Shiminao Deore front derailleur. And if so, should I swap it for an LX or XT? (C) Shouldn't my LBS be able to sort this out???


    Thanks again everyone!!!

  2. #2
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    1) Air pressure depends on your weight, and also if you have suspension or not. Also a little personal preference. Use lower pressure when you want better traction, like on the rougher trails. Use higher pressure on the hard pack and street. Me personally and I ride a Full Suspension bike and weigh 185. I ride 30 on trails, 40 on hardpack, and 50 on street. I just use semislicks full time. I suggest you get a set of those tires since you will be doing alot of road and hardpack.

    http://www.pricepoint.com/detail/10980-320_IRCMX9_SET-0-Search--/IRC-Mythos-XC-Slick-Tire---Buy-2-%26-Save!.htm

    2) This is just an adjustment and rider knowledge issue. First make sure you are shifting correctly. When you want to shift, make sure to keep the crank moving, but ease off the torque as much as possible, this will make it easier for the chain to shift.

    If you are using proper shifting technique, then it is an adjustment issue. When you are in the smallest cog on the front, make sure the cable is not loose. If it is, then turn the barrel adjuster on the shifter counter clockwise a couple of turns to tighten the cable. If this didn't solve the problem, the stop on the derailleur may also need adjusted. On the derailleur their are two screws one labeled "H" and the other labeled "L". Turn the one labeled "H" about 1/2 turn. This adjustment allows the derailleur to move out farther. If you turn this screw too much it may throw the chain completely off when shifting. If this happens just turn it clockwise to bring it back in a little.

  3. #3

  4. #4
    Baron of Gray Matter
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    Chainring is what it is called on the crank. LBS should be able to fix your problem, it will only get worse without fixing it. Don't try semislicks til you get more experienced at riding singletrack. I know experienced riders that won't use them cause they are kinda sketchy, but really fun and fast when you know how to ride them.
    "Oh Dear, I've been redorkulated."
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  5. #5
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    Looking at my tires I noticed that they say "52/54" Does this mean that the front should be inflated to 52 and the rear should be inflated to 54???

  6. #6
    ride hard take risks
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    Quote Originally Posted by mdp0430
    Looking at my tires I noticed that they say "52/54" Does this mean that the front should be inflated to 52 and the rear should be inflated to 54???
    That is the size of the tire, a measurment. Since you are doing alot of road riding you could easily run front 35psi rear 37psi.

    If you decide to hit up some trails front 29 rear 30 max!

  7. #7
    Ride on
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    How much do you weigh and what kind of tires are you running? Personally I prefer to run my tire pressure in the low 30's, but I've owned tires that needed 40PSI to prevent pinch flats.

  8. #8
    ride hard take risks
    Reputation: dogonfr's Avatar
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    I totally agree with you, i run mine between 25-28psi but he is just recreational riding & doesnt need the traction of trail or AM typ riding.

  9. #9
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    I weigh 210 pounds and the tires are: Bontrager Jones ACX 26x2.2" (52/54)

    Also, anyone have any idea how to take these damn refelctors off of my spokes? It seems as though there is some white plastic cap that doesn't unscrew connecting the reflectors to my spokes. I'm reluctant to use too much force on the spoke.... Any suggestions???

  10. #10
    ride hard take risks
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    [SIZE=-1] [/SIZE]

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by mdp0430
    I weigh 210 pounds and the tires are: Bontrager Jones ACX 26x2.2" (52/54)

    Also, anyone have any idea how to take these damn refelctors off of my spokes? It seems as though there is some white plastic cap that doesn't unscrew connecting the reflectors to my spokes. I'm reluctant to use too much force on the spoke.... Any suggestions???
    just break the plastic
    the trick is ENJOYING YOUR LIFE EACH DAY, don't waste them away wishing for better days

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by SHIVER ME TIMBERS
    just break the plastic
    Yea, I tried to figure it out for awhile too until I just snapped it off.

  13. #13
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    What cog are you in when you are trying to shift onto the big ring? It kinda sounds like you are tring to shift onto the big ring while on one of the larger cogs. For smoother shifts divide your cassette into thirds. Only use the four or five largest cogs with the small chain ring the middle four or five with the middle ring and the four smallest with the large ring. It helps reduce wear on the components plus shifts much smoother. I have the chain so short on one of my bikes that if I tried to go big ring big cog it would rip the rear derailleur off the bike.

  14. #14
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    i have some velociraptor tires for an upcoming trail trip but am currently using specialized armadillos. i weigh 150 and am riding front suspension, i usually keep my tires in the 35-50psi range (sometimes even 55 in subdivision hill climbs) depending on conditions.

  15. #15
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    I am riding a 04 GF cake 3 with WTB Motoraptors 2.24. I am 195lbs and run them @ 40 F/R, if rolling resistance is not an issue I will run 35 rear.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by jet fixer
    What cog are you in when you are trying to shift onto the big ring? It kinda sounds like you are tring to shift onto the big ring while on one of the larger cogs. For smoother shifts divide your cassette into thirds. Only use the four or five largest cogs with the small chain ring the middle four or five with the middle ring and the four smallest with the large ring. It helps reduce wear on the components plus shifts much smoother. I have the chain so short on one of my bikes that if I tried to go big ring big cog it would rip the rear derailleur off the bike.

    Jet Fixer - I'm actually on the smaller cogs when having difficulty shifting into the largest chainring... Interestingly I have no problems at all when I'm on the largest chainring and on the larger cogs...

  17. #17
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    I hate troubleshooting from behind a desk but, here goes if you are having trouble shifting from the middle ring to large when in the small cog range your front derailleur may need some fine tuning. Check and see if its strait ie parallel to the rings.
    The park tool repair site mentioned in a previous post is an excellent resource when first learning to work on bikes. Go there for detailed instuctions on how to adjust it I personally find the front harder to get adjusted right than the rear.
    Then again it may just be how its supposed to be if it is its the design of the shifters not a problem with the front derailleur.
    Hope this helps

  18. #18
    ride hard take risks
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    I left you 3 links to very good sites on how to repair, if you are having trouble & cannot resolve them the LBS is the way to go beffor you break something.

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