1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
Results 1 to 15 of 15
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Posts
    23

    Constant pedal switching

    Hello, I hope this is the right place to post this.

    I ride clipless and have ridden clipless for about a year and a half now, I love my current candy 1 pedals. But as I use the same bike for MTB (xc-trail) and commuting, the candy pedals are very uncomfortable for commuting and unsafe even as normal shoes tend to slide on them.

    I thought I'd get a set of flat pedals and simply switch back and forth when I needed the clipless pedals for MTB. So I'm wondering if this can be done without ruining both the cranks or the pedals.

    I'm using grease properly every time I switch pedals.

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation: J.B. Weld's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    2,655
    It wouldn't do any harm, but maybe consider keeping a pair of shoes at work and just leave the clipless on.

  3. #3
    Fat-tired Roadie
    Reputation: AndrwSwitch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    14,280
    I'd be nervous about screwing up my crank arms sooner or later.

    I was commuting on my road race bike a couple summers ago, with some pretty ridiculous pedals. I left some shoes at work.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    1,919
    You don't need to grease them every time. Once in a great while is plenty.
    Sinister Bikes
    Wraith Bicycles
    Sunday River Mtn Bike Park
    NEMBA
    Wachusett Brewing Co.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Posts
    23
    The crank arms are exactly what I'm really worried about

    Sent from my Nexus 5 using Tapatalk

  6. #6
    Fat-tired Roadie
    Reputation: AndrwSwitch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    14,280
    Well, demo bikes get pedals swapped all the time, and old demos are usually a good buy IMO, with threads in okay shape. On the other hand, if the mechanic with the tour buggered up the threads, they probably have a lot of spares in the trailer, and you do see posts here from people who cross-threaded or otherwise wallowed out their crank arms.

    So I see it as a risk. No guarantee you'll screw them up, plenty of people do fine, but not totally safe either.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  7. #7
    I Tried Them ALL... Moderator
    Reputation: Zachariah's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    4,655
    SOLUTION: Get a second pair of dedicated MTB shoes with cleats, for commuting. The power transfer lost while pedaling in flats suck the energy straight out of you.
    "The mind will quit....well before the body does"

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation: J.B. Weld's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    2,655
    Every time you change pedals there is a chance to screw up the threads but it isn't that easy to do, I've worked on bikes a long time and never have. Also if you accidentally leave one loose it can ruin a crankarm.

  9. #9
    I'd rather be on my bike
    Reputation: TenSpeed's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    1,595
    I commute, and I leave a pair of shoes at work. SPD's on the bike, and dedicated biking shoes for that.
    '13 FELT TK3 / '09 Jamis Sonik
    The pedals turn, not just the left one, but the right one too.
    2014 miles - 3002/2500

  10. #10
    DFMBA.org
    Reputation: MTBeing's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    1,367
    Plenty of grease and just snug up the pedals. When I tighten my Candys I use the long end of the Allen to interface with the pedal and hand_tighten with the short end. That's all you need.

    Sent from my mountain bike while crashing
    Please donate to IMBA or your local IMBA chapter. It's trail karma.

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    291
    maybe something like this, clip and traction scrws?

    Crank Brothers Mallet 2 Pedal | Competitive Cyclist

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    192
    I worry a bit about it too as i switch between clipless & platform when I DH. But it helps to use good quality pedals. Make sure threads are clean, no dirt particles. Use grease or antiseize. Make sure threads are going in straight. Make sure they are on tight. If they start working loose and you ride them like that, that will munge threads.

  13. #13
    local trails rider
    Reputation: perttime's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    11,897
    Many do it. My preference is to commute in cycling shoes and switch shoes when I arrive.

    "it IS possible that you are faster or slower than anybody else who is having at least as much if not more or less fun"

  14. #14
    Unpredictable
    Reputation: Ridnparadise's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    1,906
    So everyone is saying that crank to pedal threads are a one or limited use only product... And that every time you screw in a thread you are likely to get it wrong and bugger your cranks... These are not self-tapping screws you know.... Mine use 8mm hex and there's no need to use that until you hand wind the pedal onto the crank using multiple turns. I am not sure how anyone could get it wrong....

  15. #15
    Fat-tired Roadie
    Reputation: AndrwSwitch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    14,280
    I think the easiest way is just introducing dirt. I don't know how people manage to cross-thread, but they do that too. And the stress in the threads in a torqued connection is surprisingly close to yield.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

Similar Threads

  1. I reduced pedal bob by switching cranks?
    By Soundtallica in forum All Mountain
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 05-04-2012, 10:05 PM
  2. The only constant is change
    By Twilight Error in forum Passion
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: 03-17-2012, 09:57 AM
  3. 09 Rockhopper Comp Constant Pedal Strikes
    By jonshonda in forum Specialized
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 06-10-2011, 08:38 AM
  4. The One Constant
    By digitalhippie13 in forum Passion
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 04-14-2011, 05:27 PM
  5. Constant Leak
    By Sarguy in forum Wheels and Tires
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 02-02-2011, 10:46 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •