1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #1
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    Component guide comparison?

    Does anyone have a link or chart that compares SRAM and Shimano components and rates there level like entry to Pro.

    I've searched the net but couldn't ever find a comparison chart.

    thanks

  2. #2
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    Oh and a chart comparing and rating the front Forks also would be nice.
    thanks again

  3. #3
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    At SRAM, go to Mountain, and its left to right. Right being the lowest level.

    At Shimano, go to the Cycling portion, click on Products, then Mountain, and its listed top to bottom from best to least.

    Copy the list and paste them on an Excel file if you need side by side comparisons

    /bing

  4. #4
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    Shifters and derailleurs...

    are easy, from high to low end it goes:

    XO = XTR
    X9 = XT
    X7 = LX/SLX
    X5 = Deore
    X4 = Alivio
    X3 = Altus

    And this doesn't even touch on the new SRAM XX components. At the current time no one has anything that is even close. I'm sure that Shimano will be in there swinging with something comparable soon. But currently SRAM is the only company offering a complete ultra high end 2x10 component group.

    Of course Shimano makes what they call "non-series" components for the OEM market as well. These vary quite a bit as to quality, but are usually pretty low end. SRAM doesn't have anything comparable to the Shimano non-series stuff. If you want to spec SRAM you spec one of the above, or you don't spec it on the bike. Makes a mechanics life much simpler.

    As for forks, good luck. Forks are all over the palce when it comes to where they fit in the food chain and how they compare to one another. And it would be a difficult list com compile as many forks are "purpose built". In other words they are designed for a specific riding style, Down Hill/Freeride, All Mountain, Cross Country/Trail and Cross Contry/Race. Most manufactures offer two or three models in each of the catagories as well.

    For the most part, of the big three (Fox, Rock Shox, and Marzocchi), Fox produces mostly high end, they don't offer a fork that retails (msrp) under $499 and they run all the way up to $1700. Rock Shox runs the full range from about $120 for their lowest entry level fork up to the $1700 mark for their DH race fork. Marzocchi runs the range from about $160 to $1600. And they all produce forks for everything from Cross Contry to Downhill Racing. So it's really tough to compare forks. The best thing to do is descide what type or riding you do, figure out what forks each manufacturer produces for that riding style, and then compare those forks. There are just to many variables to make a single list like you can with shifters and derailleurs. And before long even derailleurs etc., will be getting more complicated as manufacturers are starting to produce "purpose designed" components such as the SRAM XX, which is designed as a high performance race group. Like we really needed things to get more complicated!

    Good Dirt
    "I do whatever my Rice Cripsies tell me to!"

  5. #5
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    Squash can't thank you enough for this write up. I'm just getting into mtbing and was looking at bikes that had X5 and deore components. Which is where I was kind of wanting to be in the middle of the road for components.

    Yea manufactures never want to leave things simple, the more complicated it gets the more money they make. Lol

    Seriously can't thank you enough for this, I've been looking forever for thus kind of info.

    Oh yea very nice signature quote.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Squash
    .........

    Of course Shimano makes what they call "non-series" components for the OEM market as well. These vary quite a bit as to quality, but are usually pretty low end. SRAM doesn't have anything comparable to the Shimano non-series stuff...........
    SRAM does have low end crap non series stuff. Just check out the wally world bikes.
    My old wally world Mongoose came with a SRAM 3.0 rd.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by the-one1
    SRAM does have low end crap non series stuff. Just check out the wally world bikes.
    My old wally world Mongoose came with a SRAM 3.0 rd.
    Ummm...Actually the old 3.0 stuff was available aftermarket. Shimano non-series components are not available aftermarket, are OEM only parts. Yes they were uber low end parts, but they weren't what is considered "non-series components.

    Good Dirt
    "I do whatever my Rice Cripsies tell me to!"

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