1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #1
    mtbr member
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    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    41

    Listen! Competitive Cyclist Saddle Test Kit

    OK - I had started another thread on my butt hurting and someone mentioned this thing where for 75 bucks you get 11 of Competitive Cyclist' best selling saddles to try for a week.

    I did this - and MAN was it worth the money! The saddles I thought I would like I didn't, the ones I didn't think I would like I did, and I've narrowed it down to two saddles, one I'm doing a ride on tomorrow and one on Saturday before shipping the whole lot back in the UPS prepaid envelope thing.

    I tried each one, two of them on a 14 mile ride in Red Rock Canyon (Dead Horse Loop if you know it) last Saturday - switched mid ride. The others I tried for a quarter to a half mile or so in the neighborhood, then switched and kept trying.

    One of the saddles I liked the best happened (I didn't look at any prices or weights before riding them) to be the lightest and cheapest intense saddle, the other was a WTB (there were three in the kit) which was middle of the road in weight and $150 vs. the $79 Intense saddle.

    I'll select one this weekend, then order it online - they give me a $35 credit for trying the demo kit.

    All in all - I would have guessed and bought one of the selle italia's most likely for the name and quality - but those felt the WORST for me. Everyone has a different structure I would imagine, and someone may love them but for me no dice!

    The only reason I mention this here is because it really turned out to be a great program and I honestly think it was worth my investment as I saved myself from buying a more expensive and less comfortable saddle.

    I hope this info helps others of you trying to find a comfy seat.


  2. #2
    bi-winning
    Reputation: rkj__'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    11,135
    Wow, that sounds like a good idea. I've been riding a WTB Rocket V for over a year, but I would not be surprised if there was something better for me out there.
    When under pressure, your level of performance will sink to your level of preparation.


    Shorthills Cycling Club

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