1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #26
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    A light weight jacket, gloves, and a warm skull cap.

    Or at least that's what worked for me yesterday when riding in the low 30s yesterday. Northern Kentucky area. Actually had on a base layer under the jacket but turned out to be too warm and started overheating. Rode home after work with just the jacket on, was up in the 40's though at that time.

    Any suggestions for a good lightweight jacket with vents? Mine doesn't have any. Price range less than 100$

  2. #27
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    very helpfull

  3. #28
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    need some too will look into suggestions

  4. #29
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    My rig for down to 20*, mostly road riding 'cause the snow is too deep on the trails, unless you ride the groomed snowmobile trails before they soften up.
    No cotton!
    Silk balaclava or fleece beanie under the helmet, crosscountry ski gloves, wrap around sunglasses. If its cold/nasty enough for goggles I'll go skiing. Long sleeve poly or wool base layer top, then 1-2 fleece layers depending on temp/wind. I like to have front zips so I can ventilate as needed. North Face, Patagonia are favorites. Gotta have a windproof top. Front zip for sure, pit zips can be nice. I have several that cross over from biking to skiing/climbing/hiking.
    For leg warmth I start with a light poly or wool base layer (Patagonia) and add a heavier Patagonia R3 or R4 for warmth and wind resistance. I can usually still wear some loose fitting bike shorts over the leg layers.
    I think the hardest part is the feet. Without going to some sort of overboot, I wear a thin pair of liner socks and then a mid weight hiking sock pulled up over the longies. Gotta leave the shoes a bit loose for circulation.
    Fill up your water bladder or bottle with warm water or tea.

  5. #30
    local trails rider
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    Quote Originally Posted by eightOsix View Post
    My rig for down to 20*, mostly road riding 'cause the snow is too deep on the trails,
    My clothing needs vary a lot, depending on where I'm riding.

    On the road, I go much faster, at lower effort, so I get cold. On trails (small hills, constant effort) overheating is more often the problem. I imagine that, if you do a 2 hour climb followed by a 20 minute descent, you will overheat on the way up and freeze on the way down ... unless you add some clothing at the top.

    "it IS possible that you are faster or slower than anybody else who is having at least as much if not more or less fun"

  6. #31
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    I get by most of the time with Smartwool arm/knee warmers. You don't want to overdress. I use lots of lighter layers so I can shed if I overheat - maybe a base layer, regular SS jersey, and a light jacket on top and tights or warmers on the bottom. If its REALLY cold, I stay in
    Geologist by trade...bicycle mechanic (former) by the grace of God!

    2012 Specialized Stumpy EVO 29 HT

  7. #32
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    What about for my face? I have a couple different balaclavas but I wear glasses so it's not really a good situation. Would a full face helmet and goggles work?

  8. #33
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    Is it cold enough that you really need to cover your face on the uphills - or working your way through "broken terrain"?
    Many full face helmets trap the stale air in front of the face, enough that your oxygen supply suffers on the uphills.
    For the less extreme cold conditions, something that you can easily add or remove could be a good idea: a balaclava or Buff (microfiber tube) that you can easily put in your pocket or pull off of your face.

    "it IS possible that you are faster or slower than anybody else who is having at least as much if not more or less fun"

  9. #34
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    Facial hair helps...but I hate facial hair. So I use an underarmor neck gaitor which does over some facial protection. It works really well combined with shades. Anyhow, this with a light jacket, long sleeve shirt and good socks works well for me ridding down to 30 degrees...wearing baggy cargo shorts only.


    UA ColdGearŽ Neck Gaiter | 1223227 | Under Armour US

  10. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by perttime View Post
    Is it cold enough that you really need to cover your face on the uphills - or working your way through "broken terrain"?
    Many full face helmets trap the stale air in front of the face, enough that your oxygen supply suffers on the uphills.
    For the less extreme cold conditions, something that you can easily add or remove could be a good idea: a balaclava or Buff (microfiber tube) that you can easily put in your pocket or pull off of your face.
    For the times where it is unpleasant to have your face uncovered. I thought it might be good as a windshield. A balaclava for me has been a pita use, sometimes even for breathing it seems.

  11. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by perttime View Post
    Is it cold enough that you really need to cover your face on the uphills - or working your way through "broken terrain"?
    Many full face helmets trap the stale air in front of the face, enough that your oxygen supply suffers on the uphills.
    For the less extreme cold conditions, something that you can easily add or remove could be a good idea: a balaclava or Buff (microfiber tube) that you can easily put in your pocket or pull off of your face.
    Good suggestion.I have one of these, and love it.

    Original Buff MX GREEN | ORIGINAL BUFF \ ORIGINAL BUFF | BUFF store :: New Collection :: Over 400 designs :: 24h Shipping

  12. #37
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    Any good glove recommendations?

  13. #38
    local trails rider
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    Quote Originally Posted by DavyRay View Post
    How to use a Buff:


    "it IS possible that you are faster or slower than anybody else who is having at least as much if not more or less fun"

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