1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    71

    Cockpit Adjustments

    I have about 100 miles on Giant Trance 27.5 I think I want to extend the cockpit just a bit. When I am in the saddle and getting low I feel like I want the seat back slightly. I have the seat as far back as the rails will allow. Here is where I need advice. As I see it I can try an offset seat post or get a longer neck. What are my other options? Which way you go and why?

  2. #2
    Hi There!
    Reputation: thegweed's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    699
    It depends on what kind of extending you think you need, a setback seatpost will kinda do the opposite of what a longer stem will do; yes either one will extend the cockpit, but the geometry of your bike will change, thus your leg position and such.
    Last edited by thegweed; 09-15-2013 at 03:24 AM.
    NTFTC

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    1,517
    Try the setback post. Sounds like you've got an idea where you want to be on the bike; go with it.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    16
    Your bike was built as a trail bike with emphasis on balance between climbing and descending. Installing a setback seatpost will put more weight on the rear wheel, thus, affecting your climbing. Additionally, if you install a longer stem or even inverting your existing stem with rise, it would put more weight to the front that will slow the handling down and make it push on the corners.

    These being said, modifying your bike may affect the geometry and the overall feel of the bike. Seek the help of a certified fit specialist to ensure you keep riding your bike.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mevadus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    141
    Quote Originally Posted by slapheadmofo View Post
    Try the setback post. Sounds like you've got an idea where you want to be on the bike; go with it.
    I'd agree with this.

  6. #6
    Fat-tired Roadie
    Reputation: AndrwSwitch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    13,673
    Three choices. Offset post, longer stem, putting the stem lower.

    I don't know which I'd do, I haven't ridden your bike, and I live in my body, not yours. But, I can probably help you narrow it down.

    When you put your pedals at 9 o'clock and 3 o'clock and lift your butt just off the saddle, do you find you have to move fore or aft to stay balanced, or can you pretty much lift straight up? Try to have as little weight on your hands as possible when you do this. You can even try letting go of the bars, although I value my teeth to much to take my hands away from them (and it would mess up the experiment anyway.)

    If you've already got your saddle position nailed, it would be counterproductive to move it much. Though, it doesn't sound like you do. Do you have a straight post? An offset post only has to be a $15 experiment, so not much risk and you could like it a lot better.

    Here's something on bike fit.
    How to Fit a Bicycle

    You might be a little more conservative about bar position than his recommendation, but in general I think it translates across all upright bicycles pretty well.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  7. #7
    RTM
    RTM is offline
    #1 Latex Salesman
    Reputation: RTM's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    1,576
    Since you say you need more room when in the saddle, the post gives you that without messing up the "feel" of the front end when you stand up. The post is the clear choice.
    "The bitterness of poor quality remains long after the sweetness of a low price is forgotten." - Benjamin Franklin

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation: MSU Alum's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    1,062
    Have you tried lowering your seat just a bit? If it's too high, you'll tend to slide forward on the seat as you pedal. This might be enough to cause the feeling of a too small cockpit. Easy to try, if it doesn't work, I'd say go with a setback seatpost if that's what you think makes the best sense.

Similar Threads

  1. Adjustments for B-26
    By blaklabl in forum 27.5 - 650b
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 07-23-2013, 08:27 AM
  2. Derailluer Adjustments
    By Thumpy69 in forum Drivetrain - shifters, derailleurs, cranks
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 03-30-2013, 07:12 AM
  3. 12 Hotrock adjustments
    By trap121 in forum Families and Riding with Kids
    Replies: 22
    Last Post: 02-21-2013, 05:35 PM
  4. adjustments
    By RobinGB in forum 29er Bikes
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 02-28-2012, 11:54 AM
  5. Need some MINOR adjustments
    By gemini9 in forum Beginner's Corner
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 05-03-2011, 05:10 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •