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Thread: Clipped Pedals?

  1. #1
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    Clipped Pedals?

    Ok, first does "Clipless" unintuitively refer to pedals with clips?

    My bike came with flats and they have done me fine for two years, I've never tried pedals with clips. At a recent enduro event I photographed, there wasn't a single rider using flats that I noticed and was wondering what the reason for using clipped pedals is, is it just to stop your foot slipping off the pedal (I can only think of one or two occasions this has happened to me)?

    I'm a bit reluntant to give them a try without knowing I'll like them, as bytime you buy a pair of shoes as well, they're not that cheap. I don't like the idea of the eggbeater style ones I saw a lot of people using so was looking at something like these:
    Clipped Pedals?-shpdcn1m7_zoom.jpg


  2. #2
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    This issue comes up all the time, the flats are working for you .Why are you thinking of changing? You can search box here to find the other treads on peddles.

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    You can gain from using clipless the main advantage is u can use the up stroke to gain more speed; but that comes with time. Yes u will fall a couple times when learning or forgetting u are clipped in when coming to a stop. If u decide to try them practice in a grassy field so when u do fall it wont hurt to bad.
    The shoes u can find on sale on the interwebs (jensonusa.com) those are good pedals u found u can get them on amazon for pretty cheap.
    So its up to if you feel u want try clipless not for everyone.

  4. #4
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    Had a look at some thread using search, I think the only way I'm really going to know is to try them. I foind those ones here in New Zealand for $109, everywhere else here is listing them at $250+ . Bytime I pay shipping I think amazon works out a little more expensive.

  5. #5
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    what type of riding are you doing? like the other man said if flats work, why change?

  6. #6
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    These threads often make my head hurt a little. First, some history:
    Clipless pedals are actually about a hundred years old - really! But I don't think they started to take over the market until some time in the '90s. Before then, any halfway serious cyclist used clips and straps. That's the basket things. BMX is old enough to have had some decent flats out, and cruiser bikes had 'em too. But they weren't really players in the serious road market.

    Riding in toe clips off-road sucks. But riding toe clip pedals without the toe clips sucks even more. Clipless pedals eliminate the toe clip and are actually different enough to have a name.

    I don't think that the mechanism retaining my foot to the pedal is actually that important to how much power I transfer, or how consistently. I think it's all about the shoe. Serious road, XC, and lately, some trail shoes have a very stiff midsole. The outer sole is the best the manufacturers can glue on, usually not actually very good. So keeping these things on a pedal without a retention mechanism sucks. For roadies, it was even worse - their shoes didn't necessarily have any tread at all. Still don't, in fact. Clipless pedals are more user-friendly than toe clips.

    Now, you get options. There are flat pedals with a ton of surface area and good grip. The shoe doesn't need to be as stiff and can have a regular sole.

    For myself, I still prefer clipless. I like my XC shoes, and I don't mind a little help staying on the pedals when things are getting sketchy. My shortest ride is an hour and I do a couple races a year running a bit under six. I really value my stiff soles, cants, and fancy insoles. And again, no objection to a pedal I can ignore.

    If you're curious, start with a good shoe. IME, retail on XC shoes worth owning starts at about $100. Not that they don't show up secondhand or go on sale, of course. Buy them locally, so you can try on a few. Plenty of people do fine with PD-M530s as pedals (I ride Time ATAC Aliums) so if you don't want to spend tons of money on that part, don't. I'm promising myself some carbon-soled shoes later in the winter, but I did fine on nylon for years.
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  7. #7
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    I was riding with flats/platforms until the end of the summer and I can tell a huge difference with riding now...but I am riding XC...since the switch over I am able to ride up hills better and I have more power as well..I use to get left behind and now I am able to keep up with the pack...I wasn't a big believer in them but I am now.
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    Thanks for the information, I've gone ahead an bought them, if I don't like them I'm sure I'll find someone that will take them off my hands.

    Going down to my LBS today to look at shoes, anything in particular I should be looking for?

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    Entry level Shimano mountain shoes kind of suck. I used to use a pair on the road and even then they fell apart. Try on different ones and choose whichever is most comfy.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Riley-NZL View Post
    Going down to my LBS today to look at shoes, anything in particular I should be looking for?
    If the trails you ride have little to no hike-a-bike then stiff soled shoes will get the most out of your clipless pedals and can help prevent foot pain on longer rides. If you do more hiking then a somewhat flexible sole with some grip is better, hard soled racing style shoes aren't much for walking.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Riley-NZL View Post
    Thanks for the information, I've gone ahead an bought them, if I don't like them I'm sure I'll find someone that will take them off my hands.

    Going down to my LBS today to look at shoes, anything in particular I should be looking for?
    Something that fits your foot. Everything else is just icing. Try on a few different models and see what's good to you. I would recommend picking up a pair of the multi-release SPD cleats (assuming you bought those XTs in your first post) and using those as your first set of cleats.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Riley-NZL View Post
    Ok, first does "Clipless" unintuitively refer to pedals with clips?
    Clips refer to toe clips + straps that roadies used to use to secure their feet to the pedals. Modern pedals use a cleat and retainment mechanism rather than toe clips, and are therefore called "clipless". However the the act of engaging the cleat has popularly been dubbed "to clip in", hence all the confusion.


    Quote Originally Posted by Riley-NZL View Post
    My bike came with flats and they have done me fine for two years, I've never tried pedals with clips. At a recent enduro event I photographed, there wasn't a single rider using flats that I noticed and was wondering what the reason for using clipped pedals is, is it just to stop your foot slipping off the pedal (I can only think of one or two occasions this has happened to me)?

    I'm a bit reluntant to give them a try without knowing I'll like them, as bytime you buy a pair of shoes as well, they're not that cheap. I don't like the idea of the eggbeater style ones I saw a lot of people using so was looking at something like these:
    Click image for larger version. 

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    I have those exact pedals on my road bike. I like to be able to pull up on the pedal while accelerating from a stop or nearly coming to a standstill on a climb. And when I'm dead tired, I like the extra help to keep my feet on the pedals, and positioned optimally. I think the m530's that you show are easier to clip into (less prone to flipping) than the m520s that don't have the platform. For me, they've been a solid pedal.

  13. #13
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    Re: Clipped Pedals?

    Quote Originally Posted by zebrahum View Post
    Something that fits your foot. Everything else is just icing. Try on a few different models and see what's good to you.
    +1. Also, don't get a "casual" or "commute" shoe. I like a buckle, now that I have it, on the top strap. And straps as opposed to laces.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

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    Got my Pedals today, and got my shoes from my LBS yesterday, they were the cheapest they had at $160:


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    I had an older version of that shoe. Good beginner shoe. Stiff enough sole to begin out on. Good quality, but they didn't hold up very well to my riding. The velcro started having issues, especially the top strap.

    I would start out on the pedals with the retention at the lowest setting, so that you can get your foot out easily, or more easy. You can always get on the bike, hold yourself up against a wall or have a friend hold the bike, and practice clipping and unclipping. It will take a little time to adjust to, and yes, you probably will fall at least once while you are out riding, because you will forget, or not be able to clip out in time. This will change with riding though, so don't be discouraged. We have all done it, and I have mine on video to remember it by. If you don't fall at least once, you aren't doing it correctly.

    BTW - I no longer ride a mountain bike, but do still ride to commute to work and for fun. I still clip in. I have Shimano M520's on both of my bikes, and have a pair of entry level Shimano shoes with the ratchet strap at the top, and now a set of more commuter friendly SPD shoes. I don't know that I could go back to flats, nor do I want to. I prefer the feeling of being connected with the bike, and it really helps on the hills.
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    [QUOTE=TenSpeed;10889049

    I would start out on the pedals with the retention at the lowest setting, so that you can get your foot out easily, or more easy. You can always get on the bike, hold yourself up against a wall or have a friend hold the bike, and practice clipping and unclipping. It will take a little time to adjust to, and yes, you probably will fall at least once while you are out riding, because you will forget, or not be able to clip out in time. This will change with riding though, so don't be discouraged.

    [/QUOTE]

    +1 on that. I have limited experience with clipless pedals on my road bike but the flats on my mtb just didn't feel right- sort of like that feeling I get if I drive a car w/out a seatbelt on. Anyway I've got those same pedals on my mtb and love them. The softest/easiest settings are very secure while being confidence inspiring at the same time.
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  18. #18
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    Got about 5 mins of practicing with them in before breaking my rear shock :P The shock has been fixed and is on its way back so hopefully will get to try them out bit better soon. I'll try lowering the retention setting, I was using it at the default level hey come at. I noticed some pretty big gouge already in the cleats, is that normal?

  19. #19
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    Start out at the easiest release settings and stop handicapping yourself.
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  20. #20
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    I just purchased a bike with Shimano PDMX7 pedals installed. Just wondering if there is a clip in conversion to convert them to flats? Sometimes it's nice to wear everyday shoes to go to the store or whatever.

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    hmm don't think so. but shimano do a clipless pedal with a small platform around it for riding in regular shoes. I had a set on my last bike, great for a quick run down the road for groceries.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by bbc0 View Post
    I just purchased a bike with Shimano PDMX7 pedals installed. Just wondering if there is a clip in conversion to convert them to flats? Sometimes it's nice to wear everyday shoes to go to the store or whatever.
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    There are several versions of these out there.

  23. #23
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    I like my crank bro mallet DH

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  24. #24
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    Realistically, any clip-in pedal can be converted to a platform with a little work and ingenuity (by mounting the proper clip to a piece of aluminum that has some form of traction adding surface - Skateboard Friction Tape, Nail holes punched in from the bottom, pop-rivets, etc.) even if the market has not created a commercial replacement yet. I was a late convert to clipless (relatively speaking) in the mid 90's and before that used a clip and double straps on my roadbike (through the front and back of the pedal) and half clips on my MTB. One thing that hasn't been mentioned is that both platforms and clip/strap pedals fix your foot in place which results in any twisting motion being absorbed my your knees. Maybe not a big deal (unless your north of 50), but I'm more comfortable with my current set-up than I ever was in either platforms or clip-ins. I ran Mallets until I started Cross racing then I switched to Eggbeater 3's and that's basically all I use now. Admittedly I don't see a ton of technical trail, but the EBs clip in so automatically, I don't really think about it and I can always plant my arch on the pedal to get through a tough spot. I mounted and dismounted hundreds of times with the EBs and never slipped off once. They may not be perfect for everyone, but I'm pretty dang happy with them.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by bbc0 View Post
    I just purchased a bike with Shimano PDMX7 pedals installed. Just wondering if there is a clip in conversion to convert them to flats? Sometimes it's nice to wear everyday shoes to go to the store or whatever.
    Nope, nothing you'd want to ride in longer than around the block. Those clip in platforms are made for test rides and anything you'd have that's similar would just rotate on you. It certainly wouldn't inspire any confidence.

    Spend a few more bucks and just buy a set of decent flat pedals. Keep your clipless pedals in the garage in case you want to try them later, but don't be in a hurry. There's no really good reason to ride clipless despite what everyone will tell you.
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