clipless vs platforms

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  • 01-25-2013
    cpfitness
    clipless vs platforms
    What say you guys? I come from the road so I'm versed in clipless. I have no worries about forgetting to unclip out on the trails, it's more of a losing confidence in ability to get over something and want to put a foot down, can i unclip fast enough. As a kid, I rode a lot of bmx and i feel like sticking a leg out to make an aggressive turn was what I always did. Riding clipless on a mtb i find myself wanting to do that but obviously I can't.

    So I guess my real question is, what is the threshold for riding clipped in vs platforms. What type of riding do you think "definately clipless" vs. "definately platform"?
  • 01-25-2013
    Nate3510
    I ride to have fun and I choose to ride on flats. I believe that there is "scientific evidence" that clipless is a bit faster but since i dont race i really dont care. I did ride clipless for numerous years and like you I started on the road but about two years ago my wife bought me flats and 5-10's for Christmas and I never looked back just wish I would have switched sooner. For me it is so much more fun and confidence inspiring riding on flats I feel like im a kid again raising hell on my bmx bike. Several people I have talked too that also switched to flats has said the same thing, it is more fun on flats. Unless you are doing some type of racing I dont really think that any type of riding that requires clipless. It comes down to your personal preference just like the type of tires and saddles you like, everyone has their own opinion of what the best one is for them. Give flats a try if its not for you switch back to clipless. Its also kinda cool not having to bring an extra set of shoes along to change into after the ride!!
  • 01-25-2013
    mimi1885
    Practice manuals, wheelie, jumps, drops, tech stuffs, as well as pedaling smoothness on flats. The rest of the time use clipless.

    An avg rider produce no noticeable difference in efficiency between clipless and flat pedals with sticky shoes.

    In short, pick the one you like. DJ, and trail, are about the only thing I have not seen using clipless, the rest are free for all;)

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  • 01-25-2013
    Fuglio
    Stick to clips. Feet come out easy. You dont even think about it when you need to dab. Or ride flats no one cares and it doesnt matter.
  • 01-25-2013
    TiGeo
    Have ridden clipless pedals since the early '90s. Can't imagine serious XC riding without them. I have never had a serious accident b/c I couldn't unclip. Its a no-brainer to me - clipless.
  • 01-25-2013
    Ladmo
    I like riding platforms more than clipless on my mountain bike, and since for me it is all about fun (I do not ride in organized races) the choice is easy. I'm also old, and I have to admit I love it when people make assumptions about me due to my grey hair and my platform pedals, and then a couple hours later they are gasping for air and struggling to control their bike and I'm still keepin on. No question in my mind you can generate more power and ride more efficiently clipless, but the difference isn't as great as some would suggest.
  • 01-25-2013
    mattnmtns
    I'd stick to flats. Never once had a problem getting unclipped with them. ;)

    I really don't understand why anyone would recommend them to a beginner. In my opinion it is one more thing you have to think about instead of focusing on your riding and working on your skills. Any decent pair of flats with pins will keep you in contact with our pedals. Hard pressed to think of an instance where I slipped off the pedals.

    I guess is subscribe to the KISS (keep it super simple) theory when it comes to pedals. I know I try a lot more technical situations knowing I can easily bail. Then again I don't race, ride mostly single track, and like to being able to jump on and ride without special shoes. So my vote is for flats in all situations, at least for me.

    Each to their own, I just don't have any desire for clipless.
  • 01-25-2013
    mitzikatzi
    This has been covered many times. ;)

    Ride good clip-less pedals or good flats with good shoes. To get the best from flats you need good shoes.

    Ride what ever you prefer and you feel confident with.
  • 01-25-2013
    cpfitness
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by mattnmtns View Post
    I'd stick to flats. Never once had a problem getting unclipped with them. ;)

    I really don't understand why anyone would recommend them to a beginner. In my opinion it is one more thing you have to think about instead of focusing on your riding and working on your skills. Any decent pair of flats with pins will keep you in contact with our pedals. Hard pressed to think of an instance where I slipped off the pedals.

    I guess is subscribe to the KISS (keep it super simple) theory when it comes to pedals. I know I try a lot more technical situations knowing I can easily bail. Then again I don't race, ride mostly single track, and like to being able to jump on and ride without special shoes. So my vote is for flats in all situations, at least for me.

    Each to their own, I just don't have any desire for clipless.

    Its not like im a beginner to cycling tho. Im comfortable riding clipped in i guess I just feel like riding wise are there techniques in some types of riding that dictate being clipped in is better? I suspect that i just need to improve my skills. Another example where i struggle greatly is making tight right hand turns, apparently bei g lefty or righty matters in cycling too

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  • 01-25-2013
    kjlued
    The great debate with no right answer,

    I will put it this way.
    I see friends bail on obstacles I know they could clear because they are clippled in.
    These are people that have ridden longer than me and have even said they don't try because they are clipped in. Yet they still wont switch.:confused:

    I like flats.
    Personally I think a good pair of flats with good shoes like skate shoes are the best option and spur more confidence. However, each person is different.

    So ride what you like, be happy, and don't let anyone tell you that you should do it differently or their way is better. At the end of the day, if you have a smile on your face you did it right. :thumbsup:
  • 01-25-2013
    VertKurt
    I agree that it's all about having fun, It's why we have hobbies right? Ride clips or plats it doesn't matter just as long as you enjoy it. Me personally, VP Vice and Five10 freeriders.
  • 01-25-2013
    mattnmtns
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by cpfitness View Post
    Its not like im a beginner to cycling tho. Im comfortable riding clipped in i guess I just feel like riding wise are there techniques in some types of riding that dictate being clipped in is better? I suspect that i just need to improve my skills. Another example where i struggle greatly is making tight right hand turns, apparently bei g lefty or righty matters in cycling too

    Sent from my DROID RAZR using Tapatalk 2

    Sorry. Didn't mean to imply that you are. Just it's in the beginner forum and it seems some people are very apt to suggest clippless to people just starting out on mountain bikes.

    I think you just answered your on question though. Ride flats if you think you will be more comfortable with them. Not sure where you ride. I encounter enough rock gardens, drops, jumps, and chunky boulders where I am more comfortable with flats. There is also plenty of flowy xc style trails or fire roads where clipless would be hard to argue. I guess I am lazy though. For me flats are more flexible. I can to the technical or the flow and the same pedal works for me. Just comes down to what you like.
  • 01-25-2013
    mimi1885
    It's counter intuitive but flats is not as forgiving as one would think. Good combo offer zero float. You can not hide the pedaling flaws with flats the foot will lift mostly on technical climbs.

    Clipless on the other hand, is much more forgiving, regardless of how bad you are pedaling it keeps your feet in a perfect circle, definitely one less thing to worry about. That said, if the rider don't keep up with their pedaling form clipless pedals will promote many bad habits, pushing down and pulling up is not the one;)


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  • 01-26-2013
    Jake Foz
    I ride clipless most of the time on my main bike, but i have platforms with straps on my spare bike. Best of both worlds if you aren't an elitist. Your feet are secure, but you can still pull out and throw your feet down if need be (:
  • 01-26-2013
    ibbo
    I swapped from clipless to flats last year after 4 years clipless.I'll be swapping back.I've never bailed on anything as a result of being clipped in.I've bailed on stuff in flats that I've ridden clipless,and yes I have good shoes/pedals.For some reason I just feel more comfortable on the rough stuff clipped in.
    I've given Flats a good go but they're not for me :rolleyes:
  • 01-26-2013
    mjduct
    I think the answer the OP is looking for is not so much what all of our opinions are as it is what riding styles they are appropriate for...

    I think you will see the most clopped in guys riding XC, not that technical, and pedalling power/efficiency is very important. as you get into the more technical disciplines such as Trail and AM, you'll see more and more flat riders, and in the Freeride/Downhill categories you'll probably never see clipless pedals.

    As a roadie looking to cross train, and won't be riding very sketchy stuff, I run the egg beaters most of the time, but I do have a nice set of pimplites that I will swap when the trail is a little over my confidence level (and I know that before I leave the house)
  • 01-26-2013
    bigfruits
    flats for fun.
    clipless for efficiency.
  • 01-26-2013
    millertm
    I have spent many years with clips however, once I went clipless I have never looked back. I too feel lost without my cleats. I do not feel that I can climb as well with only pushing down and not pulling up. My 2 cents.

    Mark
  • 01-26-2013
    TiGeo
    I have never seen a serious (fast) XC rider with flats - I am talking moderately technical flowy trails. As someone above said, its seems to me that if I was riding downhill, all-mountain, etc. that flats would be the logical choice. You already know the basics of clipless, once you are reasonably comfortable on the bike, make the switch.
  • 01-26-2013
    bigfruits
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by millertm View Post
    I do not feel that I can climb as well with only pushing down and not pulling up.

    you can actually push/pull through a lot of the spin on flats while seated (and even while standing after some practice). wearing good flat pedal specific shoes helps.

    a good way to describe spinning on flats i read some time ago was to act like youre scraping dog crap from your sole when your foot gets close to the ground.

    doesnt take long to learn. i suggest the OP give platforms a shot. if you have a similar experience to mine, you will prefer flats on any trail that is not pavement or non-technical singletrack.
  • 01-26-2013
    Innota
    Just read this.
  • 01-26-2013
    desertred
    In my mind, the "threshold" of moving from flat to clipless (or visa versa) is directly dependent on your confidence in your skill level and the terrain your ride. Before moving to Colorado, I rode strictly clipless as most of the trails I rode were flowing XC type singletrack. However, the terrain I ride in CO is vastly different in that it is more technical, strewn with loose rocks and rock gardens. I was (what am I talking about - I still am!) washing out or going endo fully clipped. I switched to platforms while I continue to improve my skills in the more technical terrain. When my confidence increases to where I can negotiate my current terrain without crashing (or having it occur infrequently), I may make the move back to clipless. But, I find benefit to both.
  • 01-26-2013
    Ben.land101
    I used to strictly ride flat, but once I tried clipless I can't go back. The benefits greatly outweigh the occasional skinned knee. Besides, riding with clipless will give you much more confidence on the rough climbs when you would normally put your foot down.
    Of course, for DH/Freeride, clipless isn't the best idea. But for XC and all mountain, it's hard to beat clipless.
  • 01-26-2013
    eb1888
    There is technique required to get the most out of flats. Once you master the procedures you'll stick to cheap pedals with cast pins whith just trailrunners. You won't think about your feet no matter what terrain.
    Straight Lines with Fabien Barel - YouTube
  • 01-26-2013
    wmac
  • 01-27-2013
    millertm
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by bigfruits View Post
    you can actually push/pull through a lot of the spin on flats while seated (and even while standing after some practice). wearing good flat pedal specific shoes helps.

    a good way to describe spinning on flats i read some time ago was to act like youre scraping dog crap from your sole when your foot gets close to the ground.

    doesnt take long to learn. i suggest the OP give platforms a shot. if you have a similar experience to mine, you will prefer flats on any trail that is not pavement or non-technical singletrack.

    You have a valid point however, I do not agree that you can pull up as well w/o cleats. When I was at Angel Fire Mtn bike park and rented a full 8" dh bike I did like the flats and would not have used cleats. I have been using cleats for years now on XC and all Mtn riding and I am very comfortable with them. If you like the flats that is fine too. This is an apple to oranges thread, use what you like. I am not a hater on those that do not want to use cleats but even when scraping the flats to pull up you can not get the power that cleats will give you. If you look at most Cat 1 XC guys/gals, they are all using some type of cleat.

    Mark
  • 01-27-2013
    Harvie
    Try Straigtline Amps on my beach bike they work great and have a lot of platform.
  • 01-27-2013
    cpfitness
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by mjduct View Post
    I think the answer the OP is looking for is not so much what all of our opinions are as it is what riding styles they are appropriate for...

    I think you will see the most clopped in guys riding XC, not that technical, and pedalling power/efficiency is very important. as you get into the more technical disciplines such as Trail and AM, you'll see more and more flat riders, and in the Freeride/Downhill categories you'll probably never see clipless pedals.

    As a roadie looking to cross train, and won't be riding very sketchy stuff, I run the egg beaters most of the time, but I do have a nice set of pimplites that I will swap when the trail is a little over my confidence level (and I know that before I leave the house)

    Thank you for reading my post and addressing the question! So many people responding as if I've never ridden clipless pedals before! This shed a lot of light on the issue for me. While i live in NYC and you don't think of it as a MTB mecca, there are a couple of places that actually have some quite technical trails and I'm now pretty confident that platforms will probably be more appropriate for me.
  • 01-27-2013
    kapusta
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by cpfitness View Post
    What say you guys? I come from the road so I'm versed in clipless. I have no worries about forgetting to unclip out on the trails, it's more of a losing confidence in ability to get over something and want to put a foot down, can i unclip fast enough. As a kid, I rode a lot of bmx and i feel like sticking a leg out to make an aggressive turn was what I always did. Riding clipless on a mtb i find myself wanting to do that but obviously I can't.

    So I guess my real question is, what is the threshold for riding clipped in vs platforms. What type of riding do you think "definately clipless" vs. "definately platform"?

    For me, the only time I would take flats over clips is doing skinnies up off the ground. No amount of steepness of roughness makes me want flats over clipless.

    A lot has to do with the pedal, though. I ride Speedplay Frogs, and I find them very easy and fast to get both in and out of. I can drop a foot in a corner and be clipped back in by the end of the next pedal stroke. I can put a foot down in most circumstances nearly as fast as I can with flats (close enough that it is just as fast for all practical purposes).

    Think about this: some people race DH clipped in. Some people ride XC with flats.
  • 01-27-2013
    Meowhead
    I ride for fun & for cardio health with my hubby... we ride platforms. I have a set of magnesium pinned flats and really like them w/ a pair of skate shoes with sticky soles. But I am also about to buy a single speed so I can get more of a work out. I feel like gears are cheating and that's also how I feel about clippin in ;)
  • 01-27-2013
    Fuglio
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Meowhead View Post
    I ride for fun & for cardio health with my hubby... we ride platforms. I have a set of magnesium pinned flats and really like them w/ a pair of skate shoes with sticky soles. But I am also about to buy a single speed so I can get more of a work out. I feel like gears are cheating and that's also how I feel about clippin in ;)

    Thats why i ride a unicycle with a square wheel. Round wheels are for pussies
  • 01-27-2013
    mimi1885
    Unfortunately, this topic is basically a "right of passage" question in general. There's little genuine concern about the benefits. To many noobs there's fear of being clipped in, but seriously the feeling went away in a very short period of riding time.

    CT, you've been a roadie using clipless before so you can relate what I'm saying, there's no issue unclipping the pedals, in most situation. Off road is a bit different because there are many difference types of trail so pick the one that suit best.

    I can see that in the past there's not much comparison between flat and CL, the pedals are heavy and the shoes are just like glass, nowadays the sole technology has improve and yield gummy bear like grip and there are plenty if light weight flat pedals at any price point, why not?

    There's no difference for most riders, but like kapusta said he uses flats when riding skinnies because as I can imagine track standing 10' above ground in the middle of a 90* corner would give me great comfort knowing I can just lift my foot off the pedal instead of twisting off:).

    It's not exactly threshold from one to another but just mood or preference that dictate the choice.




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  • 01-27-2013
    kapusta
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by mimi1885 View Post

    There's no difference for most riders, but like kapusta said he uses flats when riding skinnies because as I can imagine track standing 10' above ground in the middle of a 90* corner would give me great comfort knowing I can just lift my foot off the pedal instead of twisting off:).

    Yeah, I WISH :eek:

    You have clearly never seen me work my nerve up to do a skinny 2' off the ground in a straight line:D
  • 01-27-2013
    mimi1885
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by kapusta View Post
    Yeah, I WISH :eek:

    You have clearly never seen me work my nerve up to do a skinny 2' off the ground in a straight line:D

    ha ha, I fell off a 3' skinny over a pond, I swear it was like a 10' drop, and I was doing just fine on the same plank that laid flat on the ground:D

    I was really doing fine til my friends yell, don't look down, and I just told you what happened after that:p
  • 01-28-2013
    JoePAz
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by cpfitness View Post
    What say you guys? I come from the road so I'm versed in clipless. I have no worries about forgetting to unclip out on the trails, it's more of a losing confidence in ability to get over something and want to put a foot down, can i unclip fast enough. As a kid, I rode a lot of bmx and i feel like sticking a leg out to make an aggressive turn was what I always did. Riding clipless on a mtb i find myself wanting to do that but obviously I can't.

    So I guess my real question is, what is the threshold for riding clipped in vs platforms. What type of riding do you think "definately clipless" vs. "definately platform"?

    I ride clipless and have no desire to ride platforms. That said I started on platform and they do give you confidence to be able to put a foot down when you want to.

    To me the threshold is dependent on the rider. If you always have to unclip and walk a section due to fear of falling or are always struggling to get in the pedals on the ride then platforms are better. If however you can ride trail clean then clipless have no downsides.

    platforms are best for learning or for really really nasty stuff or for tying to clean the same 10foot long rock for 10-20 times in a row over 45 minutes.
  • 01-28-2013
    Ladmo
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Fuglio View Post
    Thats why i ride a unicycle with a square wheel. Round wheels are for pussies

    My unicycle doesn't even have a seat, that's how much a man I am: ::eekster::eekster:
  • 01-28-2013
    JoePAz
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by kjlued View Post
    The great debate with no right answer,

    I will put it this way.
    I see friends bail on obstacles I know they could clear because they are clippled in.
    These are people that have ridden longer than me and have even said they don't try because they are clipped in. Yet they still wont switch.:confused:

    The reason is simple. Do you ride for 3 hrs and 20 miles only to have one 10 foot place you unclip? If so then ride what you like for that 2hrs and 55 min. Now if you are having to unclip ever 3 minutes because of the terrain and don't try because you are clipped in then it make sense to give flats a try.

    BTW... I there are obstacles that I don't try, but it not because I am I use clipless pedals. They are just places I don't want to risk falling. One spot I tried and fell down rock face into some boulders. Nothing you can do when you put a foot and there is nothing there,but air.

    There a few trails I ride where I can clear everything every time. Most have a least one or two spots where I am likely to put a food down. Also even with clipless pedals I can still pull out one foot and put it in the ground while turning just like you would with flats.
  • 01-28-2013
    Naturally Aspirated
    Flats for me. I have a little less than 2 years on a mountain bike, let alone any bicycle and I'm a Cat 2 XC racer with 5 races total under my belt. I tried the clipless thing for a few months and didn't like it.
  • 01-28-2013
    mimi1885
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Naturally Aspirated View Post
    Flats for me. I have a little less than 2 years on a mountain bike, let alone any bicycle and I'm a Cat 2 XC racer with 5 races total under my belt. I tried the clipless thing for a few months and didn't like it.


    Great! You don't have to use clipless to race. In some races, I found that flat's better. One of the local race I do at the end of the year, flats faster for me. First of all, the first bottle neck to get to the single track. People are just literally standing around and wait for the traffic. I hopped out and just ran with my bike on the side of the trail, gain about 30 spots before I slowly gave them back:D

    Also, some promoter just make up technical sections that yet create another bottle neck, I just ran with the bike til I cleared the traffic this make up a lot of time on the first lap, then laps after that I can just ride my pace. Can you do that with clipless shoes, sure it's not as comfortable.:thumbsup:
  • 01-28-2013
    CuzinMike
    It doesn't take long to swap out pedals. I ride clipless 95% of the time because I find it's easier to clear hills on a singlespeed with them. In other words, they suit my riding style and the trails I ride (flowy xc stuff). But every now and again I like throwing on a pair of grippy flats, dropping my seat and riding a "skills" loop where I'll spend time practicing my technique getting over obstacles I struggle with until I can clean them. Usually after I build up the confidence to clean a tough trail feature on flats it's no problem clearing it clipped in, either.
  • 01-28-2013
    dancingoutlaw
    I predict that you'll go clipless because you have experience riding with them on your road bike and you'll likely be able to transition and feel comfortable with them on the mountain bike. I had no such experience and after purchasing my first mountain bike, I tried for weeks but never felt comfortable with clipless pedals.

    My very first ride with platform pedals and 510's sealed the deal for me. I instantly gained confidence and enjoyed my time on the bike so much more and I've never looked back. Perhaps I am losing a little pedaling efficiency, especially on the climbs. However, it's a trade off I'm willing to make.

    The answer to your question, for me, is that if I was going to ride smoother, faster, flowing trails that didn't have much in the way of obstacles- then I could probably convert to clipless. However, when I ride trails filled with big roots, big rocks, some of which are wet and slick no matter the current or past weather, sudden and steep climbs, tight and technical terrain- then it's platform pedals all day.
  • 01-28-2013
    Naturally Aspirated
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by mimi1885 View Post
    Great! You don't have to use clipless to race. In some races, I found that flat's better. One of the local race I do at the end of the year, flats faster for me. First of all, the first bottle neck to get to the single track. People are just literally standing around and wait for the traffic. I hopped out and just ran with my bike on the side of the trail, gain about 30 spots before I slowly gave them back:D

    Also, some promoter just make up technical sections that yet create another bottle neck, I just ran with the bike til I cleared the traffic this make up a lot of time on the first lap, then laps after that I can just ride my pace. Can you do that with clipless shoes, sure it's not as comfortable.:thumbsup:

    Yup. And the argument that clipless riders use that gets them over obstacles better... bs... I have yet to fail with my 510's and pinned platforms.
  • 01-28-2013
    Jwind
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by bigfruits View Post
    flats for fun.
    clipless for efficiency.

    This. </thread>

    BTW, I ride both. Neither one is better. Just different.
  • 01-28-2013
    Thor29
    When I ride lift assisted downhill, I still use clipless pedals. I like the extra control they give me and I can still unclip and stick out a leg when I want to. The only reason I would ever ride platform pedals on a mountain bike is if I were trying to do aerial maneuvers where I might want to bail in midair. But if I am just hucking it into the air and not getting too fancy, then clipless is just fine for jumping or dropping off boulders.
  • 01-29-2013
    jayseakay
    I hate flats...specially on bumpy a** singletrack. My feet fly all over the place. I was a newbie, rode for 6 mos, and I was able to transition to clips on mtn with very little problems. Coming from a road background you'll be fine. If you like DH riding and that's more your style...stay flat. If you like xc and you wanna go a little fast and have that extra pull on the up stroke...go for clips.
  • 01-29-2013
    mimi1885
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by jayseakay View Post
    I hate flats...specially on bumpy a** singletrack. My feet fly all over the place. I was a newbie, rode for 6 mos, and I was able to transition to clips on mtn with very little problems. Coming from a road background you'll be fine. If you like DH riding and that's more your style...stay flat. If you like xc and you wanna go a little fast and have that extra pull on the up stroke...go for clips.

    If you feet fly all over the place, you need to improve your technique, it's not the pedals. Switching to clipless may keep the feet attach to the bike but it does not solve the problem, your rear wheel still flying all over the place;)

    You can go faster up the climb on a SS using clipless it's higher gear and the rider has no choice but to muscle the climb so pulling on a low rpm would help. Normal riding nope, pulling does not make it more efficient, sorry. If you were to tell me, feeling faster makes you faster, I'd buy that:thumbsup:
  • 01-29-2013
    jayseakay
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by mimi1885 View Post
    If you feet fly all over the place, you need to improve your technique, it's not the pedals. Switching to clipless may keep the feet attach to the bike but it does not solve the problem, your rear wheel still flying all over the place;)

    You can go faster up the climb on a SS using clipless it's higher gear and the rider has no choice but to muscle the climb so pulling on a low rpm would help. Normal riding nope, pulling does not make it more efficient, sorry. If you were to tell me, feeling faster makes you faster, I'd buy that:thumbsup:

    I don't know how anyone can deny that having a pull and a push does not increase pedaling efficiency. You only have a push on a platform...it's as simple as that. If it wasn't more efficient than everyone would ride platforms instead of the majority riding with clips.

    And that's for criticizing my riding style...even though you don't know me...or my bike...or my location.
  • 01-29-2013
    cpfitness
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by jayseakay View Post
    I don't know how anyone can deny that having a pull and a push does not increase pedaling efficiency. You only have a push on a platform...it's as simple as that. If it wasn't more efficient than everyone would ride platforms instead of the majority riding with clips.

    And that's for criticizing my riding style...even though you don't know me...or my bike...or my location.

    Most people arent coordinated enough to push and pull at the same time so being clipped in doesnt necessarily mean more efficiency. Slow climbs you can pull only and give the pushing muscles some rest and alternate between the too. But my question wasnt about efficiency it's about ride style/ terrain and its effect on determining what to use.

    Sent from my DROID RAZR using Tapatalk 2
  • 01-29-2013
    zebrahum
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by millertm View Post
    You have a valid point however, I do not agree that you can pull up as well w/o cleats. When I was at Angel Fire Mtn bike park and rented a full 8" dh bike I did like the flats and would not have used cleats. I have been using cleats for years now on XC and all Mtn riding and I am very comfortable with them. If you like the flats that is fine too. This is an apple to oranges thread, use what you like. I am not a hater on those that do not want to use cleats but even when scraping the flats to pull up you can not get the power that cleats will give you. If you look at most Cat 1 XC guys/gals, they are all using some type of cleat.

    Mark

    Ug, this topic again...

    Don't confuse the ability to pull on a pedal with power. The pull stroke on a pedal is an emergency move, not an efficient cycling movement. There are a lot of reasons to ride either clipless or flat pedals but pedaling efficiency is not one of them. Or, perhaps I should say, that unless someone is paying you to ride your bike full time then this isn't a valid reason to choose one pedal over another. Flats are not less efficient, and ask any BMX rider if they can "pull up" on their pedals and they'll bunny hop over your head.

    I recommend anyone who is new to off road cycling, no matter their comfort level with clipless pedals from any other type of cycling, learn to ride off road with [good] flat pedals. Of course, since you are familiar with the mechanism you will probably be fine if you just run them straight away but I find that it is one less thing to hamper your skill development since you're not worried if you'll come out of the pedals or not.
  • 01-29-2013
    CS2
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by mitzikatzi View Post
    To get the best from flats you need good shoes.

    Coming from a road background what are good shoes for platforms? I was too old for the BMX craze. So, I don't know much about their shoes.