1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
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2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #1
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    Clipless pedals.

    Hey guys. I haven't mountain biked in years. I am currently a road biker. I am selling my Klein hard tail and planning on buying my brother's very well maintained Cannondale 700SX Super V with the head shock. Very old technology, I know, but the price is right and I rode this bike and love it. (Of course, I was comparing it to a hard tail, so it seems much more technologically advanced than it is.) I must admit, the look of the Super V got to me a bit as well. My idea is that I'll ride this for a bit, see how much actual mountain biking I do. If I ride it a lot and want newer technology, I still have this cool classic to have fun on. If I don't ride it much, no worries. I still have my road bike and also this cool classic Super V to just putts around on.

    This is a pretty heavy bike, as you may know. Anywho, it has pedals with toe clips on it, and I would like to go clip-less (open to opinions on that). Should I go SPD or?? Or just flat pedals? I'm thinking the clip-less pedals would make climbing slightly more tolerable on this bike.

    Thanks in advance!!

    Mark

  2. #2
    local trails rider
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    Personally, I'd keep the Klein but that may depend on where and how you like to ride.

    I like riding my hardtail and rigid bikes with clipless pedals for two reasons: they give me a little more power singlespeeding up hills, and they ensure I stay attached to the bike over some washboard root/rock sections, or small jumps and drops.

    I am not used to clips, so would be worried about getting out of them when stalling in some tricky trail sections. My choice of clipless is Time. They have more float than Shimano and a more open construction for mud and snow tolerance.

    "it IS possible that you are faster or slower than anybody else who is having at least as much if not more or less fun"

  3. #3
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    I have been on my SPD's for about a month and love them. They have made it a little easier on my inclimbing and total bike control.

  4. #4
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    I rode with toe clips for a little while when I first started mountain biking. Clipless pedals are much better! They're more secure, but also easier to get out of, and they don't have a toe clip to be flipped down and catch stuff.

    I like Time ATACs too.

    An old Klein to an old Cannondale seems like a lateral move to me, but if the Cannondale rides better, maybe a good one.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  5. #5
    TXTony
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    I would keep the Klein....because it is a KLEIN...clipless for sure..more efficient pedaling platform for XC ridding..using the Shimano system myself..I know a few dudes using the Time Pedals and they swear by them

  6. #6
    No Clue Crew
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    Shimano M647 pedals 'cause they have a big cage you can actually pedal on if you pop out accidentally. Get the multi-release cleats as well. Easier to get out of.

  7. #7
    local trails rider
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    Don't get the multi release cleats: you'll pop out accidentally

    "it IS possible that you are faster or slower than anybody else who is having at least as much if not more or less fun"

  8. #8
    No Clue Crew
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    Quote Originally Posted by perttime View Post
    Don't get the multi release cleats: you'll pop out accidentally
    True. I do pop out a little more often than with regular cleats. But, since getting them I have never just fallen over 'cause I can't get out of them

    To me the 647s and multi-release cleats are the best compromise between SPD & running flats. YMMV...

  9. #9
    T.W.O.
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    I'd keep the Klein as well, get SPD. It's a good system to start with clipless pedal.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
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    Quote Originally Posted by loewenm View Post
    Anywho, it has pedals with toe clips on it, and I would like to go clip-less (open to opinions on that). Should I go SPD or?? Or just flat pedals? I'm thinking the clip-less pedals would make climbing slightly more tolerable on this bike.
    You've asked an iconic question that is one of the perpetual topics of debate among mountain bikers. The fact that it's a perpetual debate automatically implies that there is no consensus, of course. Which means that there is no one right answer.

    It has arguably been demonstrated conclusively that clipless pedals provide better efficiency and stability. But that doesn't necessarily go hand in hand with "preference", so there's a whole host of riders who still prefer platform pedals for their own valid reasons.

    The most suitable advice for beginners would be "start with platforms; when your skills improve, try clipless; stay with them if you like them, or go back to platforms if you don't". Since you're not a true beginner, due to your past experience and your recent road biking, you should feel free to jump right into the middle and try out clipless for yourself right away, if you're comfortable with riding on trails.

    Now "toe clips", on the other hand, are pretty much universally considered unsuitable for mountain biking, if not outright dangerous (though, you'll find some converts that would disagree with even that). Not that you suggested the option of using toe clips, but I thought I'd throw that out there, just to be safe.
    Looking for local rides? You'll find plenty on my website: Bay Area Mountain Bike Rides.

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