1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
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2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #1
    Inspector Gadget
    Reputation: abeckstead's Avatar
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    clipless pedal tension

    A few months ago I decided to give clipless an honest try. I bought some budget minded pedals and shoes so that I didn't have a huge $ commitment if it wasn't for me. Turns out I like them a lot more than I thought I would.

    I have the Shimano m424's (ones with plastic cage) and I notice I have a hard time keeping the tension even between both sides of the pedals and between both pedals (left-right). While not the end of the world... my OCD traits kick in and I want things even and balanced I do tend to pull my left foot out first a majority of the time, I think that explains why that side always has a more loose feeling. I keep cranking the tension up the left pedal, but it never stays even with the right pedal.

    My actual question is will some higher end pedals keep the tension more consistant? or is this just a part of clipless and everyone deals with it?

  2. #2
    Cow Clicker
    Reputation: wmac's Avatar
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    Not familiar with the tension parts in that pedal, but my XTs stay tensioned.
    No, YOU don't understand. You're making an ass of yourself for all of eternity.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by abeckstead View Post
    A few months ago I decided to give clipless an honest try. I bought some budget minded pedals and shoes so that I didn't have a huge $ commitment if it wasn't for me. Turns out I like them a lot more than I thought I would.

    I have the Shimano m424's (ones with plastic cage) and I notice I have a hard time keeping the tension even between both sides of the pedals and between both pedals (left-right). While not the end of the world... my OCD traits kick in and I want things even and balanced I do tend to pull my left foot out first a majority of the time, I think that explains why that side always has a more loose feeling. I keep cranking the tension up the left pedal, but it never stays even with the right pedal.

    My actual question is will some higher end pedals keep the tension more consistant? or is this just a part of clipless and everyone deals with it?
    I ride a pair of XTR pedals....

    I backed the tension all the way off on both sides a long time ago...every so often I have to clean them and away I go.

  4. #4
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    I had the same problem. I switched to crank brothers pedals and the tension is always the same on both sides of both pedals. They aren't adjustable so you are either happy with the tension level or not. I find them easier to get in and out of than my spd pedals.

  5. #5
    Picture Unrelated
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    Do whatever you want, they're your pedals. If you want to crank the tension on one side to even out the feel, do it. I might offer that you could have more wear on one side than the other which could contribute to some of the difference in feeling, but what I believe is that manufacturing tolerances between springs is such that a click or two of adjustment is needed to make sure it's even.

    I think you're over-thinking things; do what you like best!
    Don't you hate it when a sentence doesn't end the way you think it octopus?

  6. #6
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    also keep in mind that your lead foot tends to be stronger than the other, similar to if your right handed, your right arm is a little bit stronger. both pedals could have the same tension, but one could feel tighter or more loose.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by abeckstead View Post
    My actual question is will some higher end pedals keep the tension more consistant? or is this just a part of clipless and everyone deals with it?
    Sounds like it's a problem specific to those pedals. Even the cheap M-525 pedals hold their tension with no problems.
    "Faster, Faster until the thrill of speed overcomes the fear of death." - Hunter S. Thompson

  8. #8
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    It could be your cleats are not exactly the same either...but I am leaning toward the pedal. Pony up for some better SPD's and you should be good to go.

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