1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
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2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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Thread: Clipless

  1. #1
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    Clipless

    I realize that this question has been asked several thousand times. I researched the forum for info on the subject before posting but couldn't find what I needed. I recently bought a Trek 4300 and I am interested in upgrading to clipless pedals. I just need general info on some quality pedals and shoes. It is only a beginner bike so I don't want to spend more than the bike itself on components. Thanks in advance...

    Josh

  2. #2
    Hey! Watch This!
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    Time ATAC Alium These are indestructible and I have never had them clog up with mud.

    50% off MSRP at Pricepoint.
    http://www.pricepoint.com/detail.htm?stylePkey=11563

    I think most entry level shoes are pretty much the same.
    http://www.pricepoint.com/detail/141...-MTB-Shoes.htm

    or if you have a little more to spend, these would probably be a little nicer.

    http://www.pricepoint.com/detail/132...-MTB-Shoes.htm

  3. #3
    Five is right out
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    Yup, get the ATAC Aliums. My original ATACs went strong for 7 years before one pedal got a bit sticky. And the Aliums are cheap.

  4. #4
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    Shimano

    What about Shimano or Crank Bro. pedals? They have a few that are in the same price range. What is the difference?

  5. #5
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    My difference is experience. If my ATAC Aliums happen to break, I will be getting another pair.

    They have been thoroughly abused.

  6. #6
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    Shimanos often have a tension setting that you can set so that your foot pops out easier. I'm not sure what the recommended cheapo/beginner Shimano pedal is though I am sure someone else will chime in with the appropriate model.

    Crank Bros- very similar to the ATACs. But avoid the cheap CroMo CB Eggbeater as it has a reputation for breaking against rocks.

    Basically, you cannot go wrong with ATAC Aliums. Nothing to fiddle with, and rock solid.

  7. #7
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    Womble, you might be talking about the Shimano PD M520.

    Found them here for $32

    They are my first pair of clipless, so I have nothing to compare them to. Paired with some Pearl Izumi touring shoes, I can clip and and out effortlessly. The one time I thought I was going to crash when my v-brakes failed from mud, I was clipped out without even thinking about it. I haven't had them long enough to know about durability, but they are easy to use and the price was good.

  8. #8
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    My answer has not changed

    Quote Originally Posted by js_paddle07
    I realize that this question has been asked several thousand times. I researched the forum for info on the subject before posting

    Josh
    If you actually researched like you said, you probably found at least 5 posts from me recommending Shimano SPD M520.
    When under pressure, your level of performance will sink to your level of preparation.


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  9. #9
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    I love my ATAC Aliums. $46 at Jenson

    I use Shimano MT-31 Shoes ($65), which are pretty comfortable. I have yet to have an issue with the pedals, they seem very solid. Clip in and out is also pretty easy, no adjustments to screw with.

  10. #10
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    Look at CrankBrothers Smarty, cheap, light, works grate, with small platform. Never let me down. If you will look for budget option among CB options - worth to consider.

  11. #11
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    Definitely go with the Time Aliums. I'm currently running the Time Atac Z pedals (have a larger platform) but I have used the Aliums on a previous commuter bike. I love the Time clipping system, easy in easy out, no muss no fuss maintainence and, IMO (and experience), much more durable than Crankbrothers.

    As for shoes, I have extremely wide feet and I have found a good fit with the Specialized Tahoe. You also might be able to find a good, inexpensive shoe made by Lake.
    [SIZE="2"][SIZE="3"]Eat to Live[/SIZE][/SIZE]...[SIZE="3"]not the other way around[/SIZE]

  12. #12
    Newbie in japan
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    i use mallet C from CB

    cant complain

  13. #13
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    The best of both worlds...Clipless and platform.

    http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_ss_sg...dals&x=13&y=21

  14. #14
    A wheelist
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    Quote Originally Posted by Screamer
    The best of both worlds...
    And the worst of both worlds - every time you use them you have to hunt for the side you want.
    Mike The Bike's home wheelbuilding info - dedicated to providing Newby wheelbuilder information and motivation.

  15. #15
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    I have a trek 4300 and have shimano M520's on it and these were my first clipless pedals and I like them. They shed mud well, and have held up to some hard rock bangs. They are good pedals and easy to learn on especially with the tension adjustment.

  16. #16
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    Another user of Shimano 520s here. I've never had a problem with them even in the thickest mud. Tension adjustement is great for beginners because can be set very lose.

    Mine are pretty banged up as well and work good.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike T.
    And the worst of both worlds - every time you use them you have to hunt for the side you want.
    Exactly. While it may seem convenient to be able to go from clipless to platform without changing pedals, it isn't worth the side effects. Not being able to clip in without worrying about which side is up would be very annoying. And add to that the fact that using most clipless shoes on platform pedals provides poor grip and increases the risk of slipping off the pedal. My recommendation: Shimano 520s.

  18. #18
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    Got the 520s

    I got the 520s and a MTB sport shoe by Specialized. I am impressed so far. I have nothing to compare them to so it could be a crap setup and I just don't realize it. I am going to try them on the trail this afternoon.

    Thanks for all the tips and suggestions!

    Josh

  19. #19
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    I just put a set of 520's on my new Kikapu Deluxe build. Only been around the yard and up and down the street so far. I should have done the switch years ago.

  20. #20
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    Right now I would have to vote against Crank Bros. Candy and for just about anything Shimano. I have used Shimano pedals for years and haven't really had any problems to speak of beyond not being able to release my left foot when they get muddy and they are very slick when wet.

    I have only had the Candys for one ride and they are wonderful once engaged, but they are REALLY hard to get clipped in. I have no idea how that is possible with four engagement points and I hope they get better with practice. Also the bearings and construction seems sub par relative to the Shimanos. That said, they are the first pedal I have used that are actually usable unclipped. I'm keeping them for now, but time will tell.

    I have never used any other brands.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by bigreen505
    Right now I would have to vote against Crank Bros. Candy and for just about anything Shimano. I have used Shimano pedals for years and haven't really had any problems to speak of beyond not being able to release my left foot when they get muddy and they are very slick when wet.

    I have only had the Candys for one ride and they are wonderful once engaged, but they are REALLY hard to get clipped in. I have no idea how that is possible with four engagement points and I hope they get better with practice. Also the bearings and construction seems sub par relative to the Shimanos. That said, they are the first pedal I have used that are actually usable unclipped. I'm keeping them for now, but time will tell.

    I have never used any other brands.
    You'll get use, just give it some time. I started with CB and never used anything else, so I can't really compare with other brands, but I don't really have any problems with engage/disengage, works perfect.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by js_paddle07
    What about Shimano or Crank Bro. pedals? They have a few that are in the same price range. What is the difference?
    I rode shimanos for ~4 years (535's, then 747's). They were ok, but as the cleats wore, you had to constantly adjust the pedal releases. Also, not so good in the mud or snow.

    I rode a set of egg beaters when they first came out for ~ a year. Broke and returned twice, then sold the replacements on ebay.

    I've been riding ATAC's for ~9 years. First the square yellows, then the current version. They are the best pedals I've ever ridden. The cleats engage the same whether new or a year old, they shed mud, and are very durable (the XS are the ones I currently use). You can get the older yellow ones used for a very good price, and they're just as good as the new ones.

  23. #23
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    CB pedals break if you look at them funny, thats my experience at least.

  24. #24
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    "I have only had the Candys for one ride and they are wonderful once engaged, but they are REALLY hard to get clipped in. I have no idea how that is possible with four engagement points and I hope they get better with practice."

    The cleats wear in after a bit of riding and then you can slkip in and out in a lovely buttery way. I use Mallet Cs and Smartys and both are great now that the cleats have broken in. The eggbeater design is simple, elegant and easy to look after. The Mallets are a lot tougher than the Smartys but then Mallets are metal, large-platform pedals designed for DH riding. i love the Smartys for their light weight and low profile.

  25. #25
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    I'd recommend a pedal with tension adjustment, like the Shimano 520. My own pedals are the 536, a predecessor of the 520, and I find them very easy to use. I hear the newer Shimanos are better in the mud, although I seldom ride in muddy conditions.

    Smokey

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