1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
Results 1 to 22 of 22
  1. #1
    One-Winged Angel
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    Climbs with rocks and roots.

    I've been riding for a little over a year now, mostly by myself... still a noob in many ways.

    There's been a recurring problem when I ride uphill, where if I'm chugging along and hit a larger rock and/or root, I'll lose all of my momentum and have to walk the bike the rest of the way.

    Is there some kind of trick to this, or is this a problem that even advanced riders have? Some of the uphills are pretty steep and while I love the challenge, I don't want to fall backwards off my bike.

  2. #2
    local trails rider
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    If it is not too steep, I try to hit the root or rock as fast as possible, lift the front a little so that the impact does not take all my momentum, and hope that I still have some left to get the rear over.

  3. #3
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    When I'm climbing I always look several yards ahead and make adjustments. If I see a steep climb with rocks etc...I do three things
    1. select what gear I want to be in (rarely every in Granny)
    2. Begin to pedal hard
    3. adjust my position (Stand a lean back, or stay seated)

    This will usually get me through any difficult sections. If I have to lift the front tire I do it standing up and then quickly shift back on the bike to keep weight on the rear tire. No matter what....I pedal hard (this is where interval training helps)

  4. #4
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    Hi, I am pretty new to the trail riding scene as well but I will give you some advice from my personal experience:

    1. Gear selection. Malke sure you choose a gear that will let you both conquer the entire climb as well as make advanced maneuvers in, around and over the rocks/roots/etc.

    2. Lean back a little. I find that it helps to lean back and take some of the weight off the front wheel. this does three things for me. It allows the front to "float" over smaller obstacles, it helps me climb better becuase there is more weight over the wheel doing the work, and it puts me in a position to pull little wheelies to either pop over the obstace or quickly change directions to get out of the way of the obstacle.

    3. Unweight the rear wheel. As you go over logs or roots or rocks you can shift weight back and forth so that the bike goes over them easier. Just as you can lean back to float the front tire you can lean forward to float the rear. I also like to do a small endo as the back wheel is passing over stuff so it does not hit the obstacle and bleed off my momentum.

    4. Pick a line. If you look up the hill in front of you you can visualize a "best" line to take. As you make your way up, just follow that line using the other things I mentioned above.

    5. Most importantly HAVE FUN! If none of this stuff works for you then just keep trying until you find what works. Mountainbiking is not about the destination, but about the journey!!!!!

  5. #5
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    Go easy on the easy parts and that will make the hard parts easy.

    Slow down and rest where you can, get a full set of lungs, then use that energy in a burst over the difficult pitch.

    Pace your self, I got a whole bunch of lines when I started to practise this.

  6. #6
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    Normally I just power through them, but if a rock/root is particularly large, I find that I can now wheelie my front wheel over the item while climbing, push the bike if I stall a bit, and, if necessarry, can lift my back wheel to help get over.

    Basically, it's the same thing I do on flat terrain, i've just discovered that my balance has improved to the point where I can do the same on climbs.

    Ant

  7. #7
    Ride 2 Work, Work 2 Ride!
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    Upper body strength to lift the front wheel then shift forward a little and dig into the pedals.

    Also you don't normally go backwards when you fall climbing. Most of the time you will fall to the side. (I know from allot of experience!)
    "Don't give up, Never give up!"

  8. #8
    ups and downs
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    Whatever you do, don't keep looking at the root or rock, if that becomes your destination, that's where you'll stop. Look at it early on, decide if it's something that you could roll over on a flat trail, if it is, then stop looking at it and stop thinking about it, and let your body deal with it the same way you would if it were on a flat trail.

    It helps to carry some momentum and scream like a Viking berserker, but maybe that's just me.

  9. #9
    mtbr member
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    Quote Originally Posted by thebigred67
    Upper body strength to lift the front wheel . . .
    I actually find that, on a climb, a lot less upper body strength is needed to lift the front.

    Ant

  10. #10
    Cheezy Rider
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeffscott
    Go easy on the easy parts and that will make the hard parts easy.

    .
    I'm with jeff...or scott. Climb at a pace that leaves you a little extra somethin' for muscling over those tricky parts, then pedal hard and lift that front end to clear the obstacles.

    The other way to go is to "walk" your bike over the rough stuff. Go at a very slow pace, stand up in the pedals, and work your way very deliberately over the junk, shifting your weight forward and back as needed. I'm amazed at the sections I can clear doing this, but it's not always effective. Sometimes you need momentum to get over the big roots.

  11. #11
    One-Winged Angel
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    Thanks for all the tips, guys. Tomorrow I'm gonna charge back up that trail that beat me yesterday.

  12. #12
    exacerbated member
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    dup post deleted

  13. #13
    exacerbated member
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    The technical climbing that is giving you the problem is probably one of the most universally understood among experienced riders and one of the hardest to talk you through. We have all stalled at this critical part of the learning curve.
    And this is why.
    As you start your journey into Mtn. Biking, you experience the thrill of the trail, the rush of the short bursts of speed, the agony of the long grind up the fire road and the joy of the presentation.
    What is the presentation?
    The presentation or the reveal is when you walk into a populated space after your ride covered in mud and blood sporting a grin from ear to ear, and with out a word, every one knows that it is You that owns the trail. It is You that is the conqueror, and if only for a brief instance You are Alpha. This knowledge of course exists only in your own mind, and everyone else just thinks you are another silly wheelman dirty and injured.

    Getting past this plateau in the learning curve is a matter of focus, determination, and the willpower to dredge up that extra reserve of power that you haven’t discovered you have yet. Well all that and knowing the thousand and one little tricks and maneuvers required to clean these obstacles.
    Ride with a better rider whenever you can, and pay attention to what he does and how he does it. When you are alone pick a spot you can’t clean, and do it over and over until you discover the line and technique that allows you to get through without a dab. Find a climb that has traction and is steep enough that you have trouble keeping your front wheel on the ground do it over and over and find out why your saddle is positioned incorrectly and fix it. Once you can ascend this wall seated spinning teach yourself to ride it standing. Once you can do it standing do the first half seated spinning and then in the middle climb a ring and hammer to the top standing with out spinning your rear. If you need to start out with a paved road at a 12% grade then that’s where you need to start, but to pass this level of proficiency it needs to be a steep dirt fire road. Once you have trained your legs you need to train your upper body and can start concentrating on picking a workable path that will get you through the near section and leave you in good position for the next.

    I will leave you with one additional piece of advice. It is not sheer power that allows you to climb the rooted path to heaven; it is the application of the exact amount of power at precisely the instant that you have the required traction.

  14. #14
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    That a pretty good description. (All except the conqueror part, try to be one with the mountain?)

  15. #15
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    LMAO! Master WorldWind has enlightened us and I now have peace in my mind...Teach me, Master, the path to tranquility. May that path be littered wwith 12% grades, mud, roots, rocks and reggae. Allow me to humble myself to the outside world, for they kknow not the inner sanctity that is the trail....

    Wooooo-saaaaahhhhh!!!!!

  16. #16
    06Trance2
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    Quote Originally Posted by WorldWind
    The presentation or the reveal is when you walk into a populated space after your ride covered in mud and blood sporting a grin from ear to ear, and with out a word, every one knows that it is You that owns the trail. It is You that is the conqueror, and if only for a brief instance You are Alpha. This knowledge of course exists only in your own mind, and everyone else just thinks you are another silly wheelman dirty and injured.


  17. #17
    mtbr member
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    the formula is
    taller gears = Speed
    Speed+technical = bumps

    no more technical sections !!!

  18. #18
    You got any chocolate?
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    [quote=Wooooo-saaaaahhhhh!!!!![/quote]

    Too funny!!!!!
    Tom G.
    Long Island, NY

  19. #19
    exacerbated member
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    Quote Originally Posted by LocalRiderSe7en
    Teach me, Master, the path to tranquility. Wooooo-saaaaahhhhh!!!!!










    You are the crow alarmed by the paper dancing in the whirlwind… you may never find tranquility.

  20. #20
    One-Winged Angel
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    Well, I tried what you guys said, and it worked like a charm.

    I tried keeping my butt in the saddle for uphills yesterday, and I made it up all but the toughest ones. Also -- and I know this is idiotic -- but I almost forgot that I had the smallest gear on my front crank. I've been trying to go up a lot of hills in my middle gear, which has made things tougher. Switching to the smallest one has made my uphills WAY easier than they had been, even with the roots and rocks.

    I'm thinking next about possibly switching to clipless pedals. My feet seem to get bounced around a lot heading downhill, but I'm not too thrilled with going over the handlebars or stalling on an uphill in clipless. Can't quite decide that one. :/

  21. #21
    local trails rider
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    Clipless:
    I suggest you first gain some confidence in your ability to ride over the rough stuff. If you are sure you will be able to ride a section, you will be less worried about crashing. If you worry, you will ride more slowly which is often a cause for falling.

  22. #22
    mtbr member
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    The presentation or the reveal is when you walk into a populated space after your ride covered in mud and blood sporting a grin from ear to ear, and with out a word, every one knows that it is You that owns the trail. It is You that is the conqueror, and if only for a brief instance You are Alpha. This knowledge of course exists only in your own mind, and everyone else just thinks you are another silly wheelman dirty and injured.
    lol ohh man, how true.
    I live in Maine and I hate lobster.

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