1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
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  1. #1
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    Cleaning up sand

    I saw the sticky on basic maintenance, but i was wondering more specifically about sand. I'm in south Florida and we have deep sand along all trails. Even after 20 min the bike is covered with it. I've been doing a good job of cleaning it after but your can never get it all. And to those people who say don't hose it off, there is no other way. You cannot simply wipe it all off. I know the point is not to spray sand farther into crevices. Even after a good cleaning i can still hear sand in the chain and around the bottom bracket. Is this ok? I'm just gonna rode tomorrow anyway. Metal on metal is bad enough without sand. Also, is assume anything i do after the ride cannot come close to the damage done while riding full speed for hours full of sand. What's your .02?

  2. #2
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    I don't ride with much sand but sometimes mud. I would consider 3 chains dipped in wax after cleaning and changed as needed with a quick link. I pop the plastic covers and seals from my bottom bracket(SLX) and clean and regrease, but you would likely need to do that frequently. Same with the Dt star ratchet freehub, which is quick and tooless. I dry wipe mud off with a terry cloth towel-- no water. Air would be an added help.

  3. #3
    local trails rider
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    The kind of sand I get only sticks to things that are wet or otherwise tacky.
    Choice of chain lube may help. Something that doesn't leave an oily surface. Look for chain lubes that say "dry" or "wax". Clean all oily residue from your chainrings and cogs.

    "it IS possible that you are faster or slower than anybody else who is having at least as much if not more or less fun"

  4. #4
    Merendon Junkie
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    Just hose it off with low pressure, it will be fine. Stay away from pressure washers.

  5. #5
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    You know what really grinds my gears? Sand.

    I'm in central FL and ride in sand all the time. After a ride I'll clean the chain, cassette, and chainrings with a Grunge Brush, then wipe with a shop rag and lube with a dry lube if necessary. That's all I do after most rides, only takes a few minutes. If it's bad, I'll blow sand off components with an air compressor.

    If I do rinse with water, I use the garden hose and keep it away from the bearings and fork seals. The point of not rinsing is really so you're not forcing water past the seals into the bearings, and they're talking about pressure washers and the high-pressure wands you find at a car wash. A garden hose fan spray is fairly low pressure.

    Like perttime says, dry, wax-based lubes help keep sand off to begin with. Wet lubes attract grit. Lately I've been dipping chains in paraffin wax, but I haven't been doing it long enough to judge long-term effects. A freshly waxed chain is scary silent, though.
    Speed solves all problems, except for those things it makes worse.

  6. #6
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    The bike mechanic told me to use wet lube. It does suck up sand, but i thought the point was that it will continue to lubricate longer than dry lube. Riding in dirt, sand, mud and water will make dry lubes less effective than wet. Is this not correct?

    Sent from my XT907 using Tapatalk 4 Beta

  7. #7
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    JJaguar, please tell us more about the paraffin. Is that all you use, or do you put it over a dry lube? How do you apply it exactly?

    TheRoeSho: Yes, "wet" lube will last longer (so I have read -- I've never actually used any). It's great riding on dry pavement I suppose. But nothing will lubricate when you add sand to it. Here in Georgia sand and dirt is a big problem too, especially when we hit a dry spell. I am personally of the belief that cleanliness is more important than lubrication.

    I use DuPont ChainSaver lube from Wal-Mart. It is a dry lube with Teflon and wax sold for motorcycles. It is cheap, so you don't have to skimp when you use it.

    I started by soaking my new chain in the ChainSaver lube to get rid of as much factory grease as possible. I apply lube with the chain on the bike every 30 miles or so, or after anytime it gets wet. Apply liberally to wash away grime, then wipe dry with a rag, and preferably wait a half-hour before riding to give the wax time to dry. I remove the chain and soak it in ChainSaver to really clean it good every month or two -- whenever it starts looking a bit grungy.

    I have 1200 miles on the chain (10 speed), and am at .25% wear.
    DuPont Teflon Chain Saver, 11 oz: Automotive : Walmart.com
    Last edited by DennisF; 06-08-2013 at 05:19 AM.

  8. #8
    local trails rider
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    The lube that is out of sight, in the internal surfaces of the chain is what counts.
    Starting from a new chain, the original factory lube is the best there is. I wipe it off the external surfaces, and apply a wax type lube mainly to seal things, so that the greasy stuff stays on the inside and the grunge stays on the outside. That works quite well for some time.

    I believe wet lubes can be good when you are constantly riding in wet and muddy conditions. All the dirt it collects requires frequent thorough cleaning.

    "it IS possible that you are faster or slower than anybody else who is having at least as much if not more or less fun"

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by DennisF View Post
    JJaguar, please tell us more about the paraffin. Is that all you use, or do you put it over a dry lube? How do you apply it exactly?
    I basically follow the instructions here. I melt the wax in a coffee can on an old electric skillet, with about an inch of water in the pan to even out the heat and keep it from getting too hot. As long as I have the foresight to turn it on ahead of time (it takes half an hour to melt a half pound block of wax), it doesn't take much actual hands-on time or effort to do.

    I've been waxing the chain when it starts to get too noisy, which has been every week or two of near-daily riding, depending on conditions. In between waxes, I've still been hitting the chain with regular lube. So far I've found that wax doesn't like wet conditions at all - you still need to use some lube for corrosion control, and water rinses it out quickly. OTOH, I've never had a chain as quiet as a freshly waxed one.

    I plan on keeping it up for this chain to see how it affects its lifespan, I reserve final judgement until then. So far I think it's ideal for dry conditions, but pretty poor for wet.
    Speed solves all problems, except for those things it makes worse.

  10. #10
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    Ok, cool. I would have never thought of the "double-boiler" arrangement to melt the wax.

    What kind of "regular" lube do you use -- wet or dry?

    Let us know how the wear test turns out!

  11. #11
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    Well, right now I have a bottle of Finish Line dry teflon lube, which I bet is identical to the Dupont chain lube. You could probably compare the MSDS of each to see. I have a bottle of that also, use it on my motorcycle. I still have a little bit of Prolink left and sometimes use that one instead. I waffle back and forth with no rhyme or reason.

    To tell you the truth, I think the fact you clean and lube the chain on a regular basis is far more important than what exact lube you use.
    Speed solves all problems, except for those things it makes worse.

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