1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
Results 1 to 4 of 4
  1. #1
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    Cheap 2002 Scott G-ZERO FX3: worth considering or not?

    Hello guys,

    I'm new to mountain biking and from as little experience as I have riding my cheap noname hardtail, it seems that my interests will be single track and maybe some technical downhill rides.
    Recently I've been made an offer for bike collecting dust for years in my friends basement.
    Quick parts list: http://bormann-fahrraeder.de/Bilder/...G-ZERO_FX3.htm
    2002 Scott G-ZERO FX3 full suspension bike, supposedly in very good condition and used only for a short while, never raced. I'm yet to get it's actual condition looked over by an experienced friend but in meantime I'd like to ask a few questions.

    -Can some parts be in bad condition due to their age and even if not used much? (tires come to mind as I've heard rubber tend to decay over time)
    -How difficult would it be finding replacement parts when needed? (this being and old model and all)
    -Given the bike's low price and if in good condition and the fact that I couldn't afford to buy a descent (hardtail) bike before sometime next year, should I go for this FS bike (even if the model is outdated)?

  2. #2
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    How much?

    I really like the Schalthebels.

    This type of frame design was old when this bike was new. The parts don't get old except for tires, tubes, and maybe the fork needs a rebuild. But when this type of single pivot design was used cross country and full suspension did not go together. They are bouncy, heavy and inefficient. I would get a hardtail. Besides, this must have been the lowest low end FS.

  3. #3
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    I used to have a Scott Nitrous, which was a longer travel, slightly newer version of the G-Zero. It was a single pivot, but worked fairly well and never let me down. Despite 170mm of rear travel it still climbed surprisingly well and I'd still ride it if it hadn't been stolen a few years ago.

    That said, I'd still rather invest my money on a newer hardtail than a seven year old full-suss.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by mlepito
    How much?
    Around $420 (300EUR), but prices here in Macedonia are such that I'd have to pay a premium for any brand name bike. That money shouldn't suffice for any half descent hardtail here... and I'm speaking about paying a local shop to assemble something from parts I choose, again a similar brand name bike would cost much more.

    Quote Originally Posted by mlepito
    But when this type of single pivot design was used cross country and full suspension did not go together. They are bouncy, heavy and inefficient.
    That's similar to what some other ppl here were telling me, I guess I'm stuck with my current (crappy) bike for now...

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