1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #1
    mtbr member
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    Aug 2006
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    Chainguide setup

    I have a transition dirtbag, 2 spd on the front, 8 spd on the back. I have a blackspire lower chainguide.

    When i went to ride it, and the suspension was boucing around, it was causing the bike to skip gears and stuff... Mind you I only rode the bike a little ways and on pavement to test it out, but the kid before that "worked at a bike shop" had it set to where the chain was basically riding on the lower frame rail, it had some rubber wrapped around it, but i took it all off to replace it with something better, my question is:

    How does one properly setup a chaing guide (single or double) to get it to not interfere with the lower frame rail or at least cause it to work like it's supposed to...

  2. #2
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    Reputation: Kaba Klaus's Avatar
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    Jul 2005
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    In theory it is easy:

    1) Put the chain guide on. The lower pulley should (of course) pull the chain up a little from the horizontal. In most cases the pulley is at about at 7 o'clock (using the clock analogy to describe angle here).

    Depending on the chain stays you may have to rotatate the chain guide more towards 6 o'clock to eliminate interferance. Perfectionists remove the rear shock to be able to move the rear triangle freely and do a proper collision test. Moving towards 6 o'clock obviously reduces the chain tension the guide provides.

    2) Assemble the complete drive train. Spin the cranks, go through the gears on the bike stand. Probably you'll see shifting issues (duh - you experienced just that).

    3) Work with washers to bring the pulley in line with the chain rings. Every manufacturer has a different system to do this. If this does not work you have to take a look at BB spacers. By either adding or removing BB spacers you align chain rings and pulley.

    I real life this may mean you spend a few hours on trial and error here.
    "Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit." - And I agree.

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