1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
Results 1 to 5 of 5
  1. #1
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    Chain Ring Question

    Is there a noticable difference between a 44t chain ring and a 46t chain ring?

  2. #2
    pronounced may-duh
    Reputation: Maida7's Avatar
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    I don't think so. 46 will be slightly faster. But really how often do you use your big ring? I found I never use mine so I replaced it with a bash ring. That may be the reason for my answer. Please note you may need a longer chain if your switching to the 46

  3. #3
    No good in rock gardens..
    Reputation: Sideknob's Avatar
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    I've run both sorts. You won't notice a huge difference in open country with a 46 tooth.
    My Cannondale Lefty keeps failing....

  4. #4
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    I use the big ring all the time because I ride on the road and very light trails at the moment.

    You may be scratching your head wondering why I bought a mountain bike instead of a street bike right now - so I will answer that:

    I have been suffering from chronic lower back pains due to my work and it was advised that I started to exercise and bicycling was one of the things that was mentioned.

    Since I live in the Netherlands, most of the roads are brick - which happen to be uneven due to the heavy construction & delivery trucks that use them on a regular basis.

    I ended up getting a full suspension bicycle to help take the beating out of what I would be going through with a hardtail since the bulk of the damage was done when I was in my early 20's and was too stupid (and poor) to let everything heal properly in the first place.

  5. #5
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    I have several great hills and I ride down them fast, at 63 km/h I am about 129 rpm. I will get a 46 th big ring for these burns.

    This should get me up to 66 km/h, and with a little more foot speed I am trying for 70 km/h.

    I think it will give me a few more options for gear ratios for some long fire road descents above the 30 km/h range.

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