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  1. #1
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    Carbon Handlebars

    Im trying to lighten up my bike a little bit and decided to go to get some carbon parts....so Ive been trying to zero in a couple of handlebars...ok one question I have is...would going the ebay route and getting a used bar be a bad thing?..j/c..and what handlebars do you like?..Im shooting for a 27" bar with a high rise to them.
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  2. #2
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    Despite what marketing departments might try to convince you of, handlebar height, width, style, etc are more of a personal fit/preference thing.

    Different carbon bars are made for different amounts of strength and weight.

    There are lots of great brands out there. Make sure you are not getting a knockoff bar.

  3. #3
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    First off - how ready for carbon are you? If you are a relative newbie who still crashes occasionally, carbon may not be a wise investment. Carbon is strong under normal use - but repeated impacts with trees, rocks, the ground, etc, renders carbon significantly weaker, with each successive, unplanned dismount of the bike. I too, wanted carbon from the very beginning, but my lack of bike handling skills back then, simply made my investment of carbon bars a short-lived experience. Buying used carbon is typically not a good idea, because you have NO IDEA what they previously underwent.

    If you want to lighten your bike - start with the wheels. A reduction in rolling mass offers the most significant performance improvement, per dollar spent. Here is my Weight Weenie sliding scale of parts upgrades and cost factor:

    $=0-50
    $$=50-150
    $$$=150-500
    $$$$=500-up
    1) Wheels - up to 2 pounds of weight saved $$$$
    2) Tires - up to 1 pound weight saved $$ (traction may suffer)
    3) Fork - up to 1 pound saved $$$$
    4) Crankset/BB - up to 1/2 pound saved $$$
    5) Cassette/Chain - up to 1/4 pound saved $$$
    6) Saddle - up to 1/4 pound saved $$ (comfort may suffer)
    7) Brakes - up to 100 grams saved $$$
    8) Seatpost - up to 100 grams saved $$
    9) Bars - up to 100 grams saved $$
    10) Stem - up to 75 grams saved $$
    11) Shifters - up to 75 grams saved $$
    12) Pedals - up to 60 grams saved $$$
    13) Derailleurs - up to 50 grams saved $$$

    With the above - you can drop close to 7 pounds of bike weight...and that's not even including frame upgrade weight savings!
    Last edited by Cayenne_Pepa; 08-05-2013 at 09:58 AM.
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  4. #4
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    If you have a cheap fork now then upgrading the fork would be the best bang for the buck - drop a bunch of weight and gain performance. Unless you have a steel bar, you'll never notice the carbon difference.
    Otherwise, wheels and tires.

  5. #5
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    BlueSkyCycling.com - Giant Contact SLR Carbon Riser Handlebar
    These are 690 175g for $65.
    They have others.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zachariah View Post
    Carbon is strong under normal use - but repeated impacts with trees, rocks, the ground, etc, renders carbon significantly weaker, with each successive, unplanned dismount of the bike.
    Are you sure about that?

    This debate comes up all the time. As far as I know, carbon bars can have much better fatigue life and ultimate strength than aluminum. People seem to think its more fragile in crashes but I've never seen any definitive evidence of that.

  7. #7
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    Not sure about carbon bars to lose weight, but they definitely helped take "some" vibration out of the small fast bumps.

    As for bar width, I cut mine to fit me personally (they were 720).

  8. #8
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    Before I would drop the coin for a carbon handlebar, I would make darned sure that I knew what I wanted in a handlebar as far as backsweep, upsweep, rise, and width.

  9. #9
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    Not a fan of carbon, its not recyclable!
    You wont drop that much weight, maybe 100grmsgrms
    Just ride harder! Wear spandex!

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by superj101 View Post
    Not a fan of carbon, its not recyclable!
    You wont drop that much weight, maybe 100grmsgrms
    Just ride harder! Wear spandex!
    Carbon fiber is not biodegradable, but carbon fiber IS recyclable. If you put it in a landfill, it will be there a long, long time.

    It has it's issues with the cost to recycle being among them, but it's possible, and it is being done.
    Last edited by jeffj; 08-13-2013 at 05:32 PM. Reason: correct a typo

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dresdenlock View Post
    Im trying to lighten up my bike a little bit and decided to go to get some carbon parts....so Ive been trying to zero in a couple of handlebars...ok one question I have is...would going the ebay route and getting a used bar be a bad thing?..j/c..and what handlebars do you like?..Im shooting for a 27" bar with a high rise to them.
    What else have you done to reduce weight? HB is not the first place I'd look. The weight savings will be negligible.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zachariah View Post
    $=0-50
    $$=50-150
    $$$=150-500
    $$$$=500-up
    1) Wheels - up to 2 pounds of weight saved $$$$
    2) Tires - up to 1 pound weight saved $$ (traction may suffer)
    3) Fork - up to 1 pound saved $$$$
    4) Crankset/BB - up to 1/2 pound saved $$$
    5) Cassette/Chain - up to 1/4 pound saved $$$
    6) Saddle - up to 1/4 pound saved $$ (comfort may suffer)
    7) Brakes - up to 100 grams saved $$$
    8) Seatpost - up to 100 grams saved $$
    9) Bars - up to 100 grams saved $$
    10) Stem - up to 75 grams saved $$
    11) Shifters - up to 75 grams saved $$
    12) Pedals - up to 60 grams saved $$$
    13) Derailleurs - up to 50 grams saved $$$

    With the above - you can drop close to 7 pounds of bike weight...and that's not even including frame upgrade weight savings!
    I also was considering starting with carbon bars for a weight upgrade until I saw this. Thanks for the feedback.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zachariah View Post
    First off - how ready for carbon are you? If you are a relative newbie who still crashes occasionally, carbon may not be a wise investment. Carbon is strong under normal use - but repeated impacts with trees, rocks, the ground, etc, renders carbon significantly weaker, with each successive, unplanned dismount of the bike. I too, wanted carbon from the very beginning, but my lack of bike handling skills back then, simply made my investment of carbon bars a short-lived experience. Buying used carbon is typically not a good idea, because you have NO IDEA what they previously underwent.

    If you want to lighten your bike - start with the wheels. A reduction in rolling mass offers the most significant performance improvement, per dollar spent. Here is my Weight Weenie sliding scale of parts upgrades and cost factor:

    $=0-50
    $$=50-150
    $$$=150-500
    $$$$=500-up
    1) Wheels - up to 2 pounds of weight saved $$$$
    2) Tires - up to 1 pound weight saved $$ (traction may suffer)
    3) Fork - up to 1 pound saved $$$$
    4) Crankset/BB - up to 1/2 pound saved $$$
    5) Cassette/Chain - up to 1/4 pound saved $$$
    6) Saddle - up to 1/4 pound saved $$ (comfort may suffer)
    7) Brakes - up to 100 grams saved $$$
    8) Seatpost - up to 100 grams saved $$
    9) Bars - up to 100 grams saved $$
    10) Stem - up to 75 grams saved $$
    11) Shifters - up to 75 grams saved $$
    12) Pedals - up to 60 grams saved $$$
    13) Derailleurs - up to 50 grams saved $$$

    With the above - you can drop close to 7 pounds of bike weight...and that's not even including frame upgrade weight savings!
    That's a nice chart. Being a manufacturing operations guy my whole career, though, I'd rather see it stated in grams/$

    I'm sure some weight weenie has put that data together.

  14. #14
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    If u want to lighten up your bike, before buying stuff u should find out what different parts of your bike weigh that way you'll know what u r getting for your dollar when shopping.

    A handle bar upgrade could be big bang for your buck IF u have 700g steel bars like my Hardrock had... etc. I ended up buying Easton Monkey Lite 25.4mm carbon bars for 36 bux on sale which saved me a ton of weight. However, that was just MY situation.

  15. #15
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    I have considered picking up a light scale for my build.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by KevinGT View Post
    That's a nice chart. Being a manufacturing operations guy my whole career, though, I'd rather see it stated in grams/$

    I'm sure some weight weenie has put that data together.
    LOL....I'm the weight weenie!
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  17. #17
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    I take pictures of all my parts on the scale and file them on my server under "Bike Weight"

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by zephxiii View Post
    I take pictures of all my parts on the scale and file them on my server under "Bike Weight"
    I've weighed so many bike parts...I can estimate an approximate, complete bike weight, based on what is weighed/stored inside my internal flash drive(ie; brain)...
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  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zachariah View Post
    I've weighed so many bike parts...I can estimate an approximate, complete bike weight, based on what is weighed/stored inside my internal flash drive(ie; brain)...
    haha...i'm getting there...

  20. #20
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    Re: Carbon Handlebars

    In would buy a Chinese brand over a used bar. A used bar already comes with a history of crashes behind it. Hylix has had a bunch of positive reviews here.

    Carbon stems are just too dangerous, and wouldn't go there.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zachariah View Post
    I've weighed so many bike parts...I can estimate an approximate, complete bike weight, based on what is weighed/stored inside my internal flash drive(ie; brain)...
    Zachariah, what do you estimate my Titus Rockstar build weighs? Just curious. My wild guess is around 27lbs. Your guess might be more educated than mine.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by superj101 View Post
    Not a fan of carbon, its not recyclable!
    You wont drop that much weight, maybe 100grmsgrms
    Just ride harder! Wear spandex!
    Id rather chop my leg off to save weight

  23. #23
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    When it comes to carbon bars weight is just a bonus, the real reason I get carbon bars is because they ride better.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Luis M. View Post
    Zachariah, what do you estimate my Titus Rockstar build weighs? Just curious. My wild guess is around 27lbs. Your guess might be more educated than mine.
    Need more info: size, stock, or upgraded?
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  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by zephxiii View Post
    When it comes to carbon bars weight is just a bonus, the real reason I get carbon bars is because they ride better.
    Please explain?

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Island20v View Post
    Please explain?
    What he meant was the vibration damping and hand comfort. Aluminum is very stiff - but the rattles can make hands fall asleep and jar tooth fillings out....;P
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  27. #27
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    They have great dampening characteristics, so they soak up a bit of the smaller chatter that you may feel with a aluminum bar. This is something not taken into consideration by the chart posted above. I consider a carbon bar a great upgrade point in-line with pedals/seat/seatpost/grips as your always going to be in contact with it, so the overall ride enjoyment is improved by having a nice carbon bar IMO.

  28. #28
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    I get that they help out with vibrations but wouldn't the excess flex cause for issues in cornering? I am on the fence about ordering a set to help with the numbing you get from long agressive rides but worred about flex in corners or jumps.

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Island20v View Post
    I get that they help out with vibrations but wouldn't the excess flex cause for issues in cornering? I am on the fence about ordering a set to help with the numbing you get from long agressive rides but worred about flex in corners or jumps.
    A quality carbon bar will have nearly zero flex.

    Recommend: Easton EC70 Carbon Riser, Carbon XC Wide flat bar. Super-stiff and comfy.
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  30. #30
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    My Easton Monkey Lite XC bars (I have two of them) have some flex in them. You can flex them on the bike just standing if u try, u can see it flex a little. They ride really nice though.

    EDIT: I should note that they are 25.4mm which probably contributes to flexing. I got them on sale at Jenson for 37 dollars each which was awesome. I should note that original steel handlebars on the bike clocked in at 721g and the Easton Bars clocked in at 178g which makes it the best 37 dollars I ever spent on that bike!! The steel bars were super rigid and the dampening effect (as well as being super light) was immediately noticed.

  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by zephxiii View Post
    My Easton Monkey Lite XC bars (I have two of them) have some flex in them. You can flex them on the bike just standing if u try, u can see it flex a little. They ride really nice though.
    Yeah, the Monkey Lite XC does indeed flex. I also broke mine, last year. Easton now makes the EC70 clamp area a beefy, 10mm thick all around, tapering to 3mm at the bar ends. It's so stiff now at 155g and 685mm wide - I sold the 710mm Enve carbon SWP flat bar and used the $110 savings towards the Easton Haven carbon 31.6 seatpost....for the WIN!
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    The EC70's are on sale:

    BlueSkyCycling.com - Easton EC70 XC Carbon Handlebar 2012

    I am also considering a few mm wider to get the Haven AM bars which are also on sale:

    BlueSkyCycling.com - Easton Haven AM Carbon Handlebar 2012

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Island20v View Post
    The EC70's are on sale:

    BlueSkyCycling.com - Easton EC70 XC Carbon Handlebar 2012

    I am also considering a few mm wider to get the Haven AM bars which are also on sale:

    BlueSkyCycling.com - Easton Haven AM Carbon Handlebar 2012
    Awesome price....cant beat them! Read my review:

    Amazon.com: Easton EC70 XC Wide Handlebar Black, 31.8: Sports & Outdoors
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  34. #34
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    carbon bars were the least useful of the upgrades I did. Luckily they were a xmas gift. I have a 140mm fork and ride at 20 psi in the front. There is not vibration/chatter for the carbon bar to damp.

    Best upgrade was light bicycles wheels, felt immediate improvements in handling on technical terrain and downhill

    Next best was dropper

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zachariah View Post
    Awesome price....cant beat them! Read my review:

    Amazon.com: Easton EC70 XC Wide Handlebar Black, 31.8: Sports & Outdoors

    Whats the difference between the 25.4 and the 31.8 in regards to size. Id go high rise but not sure which one to go with. the 31.8 is wider obviously.

    Edit: answered my own question with following thread, 25.4 vs 31.8 Handlebar
    Last edited by Brockwan; 08-14-2013 at 07:40 AM. Reason: found a thread

  36. #36
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    Those are the clamp size at the stem. 25.4 is a dated/older size. Newer bikes come with the 31.8 and the smaller size is pretty much a legacy size at this point. You can use shims to put a 25.4 bar into a 31.8 stem, but not the other way around.

  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by goodmojo View Post
    carbon bars were the least useful of the upgrades I did. Luckily they were a xmas gift. I have a 140mm fork and ride at 20 psi in the front. There is not vibration/chatter for the carbon bar to damp.

    Best upgrade was light bicycles wheels, felt immediate improvements in handling on technical terrain and downhill

    Next best was dropper
    Wheels are in the future for sure but with the little one due at the end of the month it's a cost that will have to wait a few months.

  38. #38
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    Lighter carbon bars will noticeably lighten a front end. I went from a 330g alloy bar, to a 145g Easton carbon bar. That is nearly a 1/2 pound drop. On steep technical climbs - I now have to consciously "push" the front end down.

    Wait until you upgrade the wheels.....OMG - your bike will have a new life injected into it! Nothing but SMILES.....
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    Upgrading to really light wheels is.....amazing. It makes me hate all my other bikes lol.

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    Wish I could right now. I have a few climbs that could really benefit from the lighter rotating mass. Figured bars would be a start though. According to Trek, my oroginal bars were 456g and the new Easton bars are 165g so that should be a noticeable difference.

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    291g or 0.64lbs off of the steering assembly is a good start!

  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by zephxiii View Post
    291g or 0.64lbs off of the steering assembly is a good start!
    Yep, the noticeable threshold for weight reduction, is felt at 1/2 pound and greater!
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  43. #43
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    Id have to agree with u, but it has nothing to do with biking. I played hockey for 12 years, using all wood, aluminum, and CF sticks. with a good slap shot from my 225lb frame, that stick would flex like crazy but it would never break. Some of my sticks are 7-10 years old! I bring this up only because I would trust CF after seeing the way a used and abused hockey stick gets.
    Rockhopper 29er

    -FSA Carbon handlebars, stem, & seatpost
    -2011 Rockshox Reba
    -Stan's Flow Wheelset
    -Ergon Grips

  44. #44
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    CF is really strong, I was just worried about the flex. I should find out soon as I placed an order yesterday. Hoping to have them in time for my Saturday/Sunday morning ride.

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    Got the Easton bars in the mail today. Anything special I need to know about for installation? I am always paranoid that I will overtighten or not tighten the 4 bolts on the front side of the stem and eat rock on my next ride.

  46. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by Island20v View Post
    Got the Easton bars in the mail today. Anything special I need to know about for installation? I am always paranoid that I will overtighten or not tighten the 4 bolts on the front side of the stem and eat rock on my next ride.
    from what ive gathered, when working with carbon u have to use a CF grease on the parts and use a torque wrench..
    Rockhopper 29er

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    Yeah I picked some up. Helps give that extra layer of grip on the smooth CF surface.

  48. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by Island20v View Post
    Got the Easton bars in the mail today. Anything special I need to know about for installation? I am always paranoid that I will overtighten or not tighten the 4 bolts on the front side of the stem and eat rock on my next ride.
    Torque wrench recommended. However, I have been successful in the past, using the "snug + quarter-turn" method as a temporary measure, without issues(early morning ride, no LBS open). Tighten the stem faceplate in a "X" pattern, making sure the bolt gaps are about equal, all-around.
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  49. #49
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    Carbon Handlebars

    Carbon Handlebars-imageuploadedbytapatalk1376714835.758875.jpg

    Got this on Amazon. Breaks away at 5 N-M. Also got 4 and 6 N-M. Works great.

  50. #50
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    Read the stem manual. Some like the ea70 the top plate is flush while the lower have a gap.

    Btw what about the eBay carbon bars
    Token
    Merek
    Hylix

  51. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by cloudbuster View Post
    Read the stem manual. Some like the ea70 the top plate is flush while the lower have a gap.

    Btw what about the eBay carbon bars
    Token
    Merek
    Hylix
    I had Token before. They are very light, but also break easy. No more cheap China CF for me...
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  52. #52
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    Carbon Handlebars

    First ride with the carbon bars, and I noticed the difference. The vibrations were absorbed and my hands didn't go numb after hard downhill action. Can't complain with the .6lbs weight reduction too.

  53. #53
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    yea the first place I look for weight reduction is handle bars..

    If your hands were going numb the carbon bars didn't fix it a change in sweep did.
    I mean if there were jobs then we wouldn't be on the dole then maybe we'd be singing about love and kissing-Joe Strummer

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    Quote Originally Posted by Germany_chris View Post
    If your hands were going numb the carbon bars didn't fix it a change in sweep did.
    Really? Only difference between my original bars and these bars was a 5mm width and a 20mm rise vice 15mm. I figured since they had a little flex in them they might absorb some vibrations vice the aluminum bars.

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    Well IMO the dampening should have helped the hands...I was noticing that this weekend on descents on my alu bars...so much little vibration caused me to grip really tight. Would be nice to take a bit of that out.

  56. #56
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    Exactly. The previous weekend I rode the exact same trail with alot of vibration issues. I would have to slow down and shake em out after the long downhill runs. After the ride on Saturday, I was fine. They make a difference in that aspect as well as weight. Best money spent so far.

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    Well I decided to pony and get some carbon bars. I felt it was time to get some better riding bars. I went with the Enve Sweep since the profile seemed to be about the same as my Syncros bars. I may leave them at 740mm at first to try out 40mm wider bars hehe.

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    Carbon Handlebars

    Those are some wide bars! Mine came with 720mm and I feel like they are too wide.

  59. #59
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    Carbon Handlebars

    Just picked me up a park tool torque wrench for $77 + free shipping. I see it as a very sound investment for the future as it's a tool I'll be using a lot.
    Remember when carbon fibre fails, if it fails, it fails instantly. It's pretty imperative you don't guess with it. The thought of my bars snapping on me whilst I'm at speed down a rocky hill scares the bejesus out of me.

    If installing use the right tool. It's worth your life literally.




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  60. #60
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    Where did you get the wrench at that price?

  61. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by xycarp View Post
    Where did you get the wrench at that price?
    eBay.

    Go to search park tool toque wrench then sort by price + shipping lowest first. I think there's a few left


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    Quote Originally Posted by Brockwan View Post
    Remember when carbon fibre fails, if it fails, it fails instantly.

    Not necessarily, but I get your point about the safety implications of proper torque

    Once I over tightened my quick release seatpost clamp on a ride when I was adjusting my seat height.
    When I got home I saw that my seatpost had a vertical split in it about 4 inches long. I rode on that busted seatpost for 7 or so miles of rough jarring singletrack without knowing it was damaged. It held up fine. Of course, I never used that post again, but even with that big crack in it it seems like its still pretty strong!

  63. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brockwan View Post
    Remember when carbon fibre fails, if it fails, it fails instantly. It's pretty imperative you don't guess with it. The thought of my bars snapping on me whilst I'm at speed down a rocky hill scares the bejesus out of me.
    Actually carbon fiber usually fails much more progressively than aluminum does. Aluminum for bikes tends to fail brittlely where carbon fails by breaking one fiber or fiber bundle at a time. Look at what happens when an aluminum frame fails, it just pops in half. A failure is a failure but I'd rather have the bar crumple than I would have the bar sheer off like I've seen aluminum bars do.

    Having a torque wrench is good advice but perhaps better advice is to make sure you properly install and maintain every part of your bike (not just the bars) and when it comes to something important like handlebars replace them if there's a question after an impact. That applies to metal just as much as it does to carbon.

    If you're doing something that makes you worry about modern carbon fiber parts or frames then you need to realize that your metal parts are built for the same duty cycles and the same usage.
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  64. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by zebrahum View Post
    Actually carbon fiber usually fails much more progressively than aluminum does. Aluminum for bikes tends to fail brittlely where carbon fails by breaking one fiber or fiber bundle at a time. Look at what happens when an aluminum frame fails, it just pops in half. A failure is a failure but I'd rather have the bar crumple than I would have the bar sheer off like I've seen aluminum bars do.

    Having a torque wrench is good advice but perhaps better advice is to make sure you properly install and maintain every part of your bike (not just the bars) and when it comes to something important like handlebars replace them if there's a question after an impact. That applies to metal just as much as it does to carbon.

    If you're doing something that makes you worry about modern carbon fiber parts or frames then you need to realize that your metal parts are built for the same duty cycles and the same usage.
    1. Just going off research I've read and what I've read in countless magazines so I guess they are wrong too. I'll have another look into this

    2. Obviously I was talking about the carbon bar to be installed. This thread isn't about general bike maintenance and I wasn't referring to metal either nor was the op, but yes again same for metal even though that's not what we are talking about here. I think it's pretty obvious the general installation of every part of your bike is important but again thread subject is regarding the bars hence what I referenced.

    3. Completely agree but what has metal got to do with said thread subject?



    FYI here's one article on point one.




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    If carbon fiber was going to fail without warning and catastrophically without warning , aircraft would not be built using parts made of it. Just sayin, leave the histrionic speculation to pinkbike.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Brockwan View Post
    1. Just going off research I've read and what I've read in countless magazines so I guess they are wrong too. I'll have another look into this

    2. Obviously I was talking about the carbon bar to be installed. This thread isn't about general bike maintenance and I wasn't referring to metal either nor was the op, but yes again same for metal even though that's not what we are talking about here. I think it's pretty obvious the general installation of every part of your bike is important but again thread subject is regarding the bars hence what I referenced.

    3. Completely agree but what has metal got to do with said thread subject?



    FYI here's one article on point one.
    That article you posted is like if someone was explaining to you that a bike had "wheels" and "a chain", it doesn't actually say anything scientific about carbon failure modes. The only mention is failure is the gross generalization highlighted in a big black box above the article to play up people's emotions. Nowhere in that article fragment do they explain why they would claim that. Carbon failure is at least as varied as failure in metal; everything from snap brittle to behavior similar to ductile bending (not going to bend back though) is possible and it all depends on the design of the laminate. Everyone is always waving their arms screaming about catastrophic carbon failure, but how many people have actually experienced one? In my experience I've seen one carbon frame break and it happened as the frame slowly broke down the middle, certainly not what I would call catastrophic. In contrast I've seen the aftermath of many metal frame breaks and they've all been the sheared off head tube variety with, I suppose you could call, catastrophic failures of the tube(s) and under examination it's a clean fast break. I've never seen a carbon handlebar break that wasn't the victim of some horrible garage crash but I have seen aluminum handlebars sheared at the stem clamp; that's actually terrifying.

    The reason I bring up metal is that I get tired of everyone blasting in about how carbon explodes when you look at it crossways; it just doesn't. So I always say that if you are scared of carbon breaking you should be aware that metal parts are just as susceptible to failure. When you go spouting things like carbon fails catastrophically without quantifying the statement in any way, well, you're wrong and then my eyes turn red and I go on a rant irrespective of the topic at hand.

    Carbon is very damage tolerant but (here's the part where we go back to the long since abandoned OP's post) if the manufacturer doesn't control their process or doesn't use appropriate materials then you can't say for sure exactly what you're getting. This is why so many people, 5 months ago, said to avoid the knock-off carbon parts.
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  67. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by zebrahum View Post
    That article you posted is like if someone was explaining to you that a bike had "wheels" and "a chain", it doesn't actually say anything scientific about carbon failure modes. The only mention is failure is the gross generalization highlighted in a big black box above the article to play up people's emotions. Nowhere in that article fragment do they explain why they would claim that. Carbon failure is at least as varied as failure in metal; everything from snap brittle to behavior similar to ductile bending (not going to bend back though) is possible and it all depends on the design of the laminate. Everyone is always waving their arms screaming about catastrophic carbon failure, but how many people have actually experienced one? In my experience I've seen one carbon frame break and it happened as the frame slowly broke down the middle, certainly not what I would call catastrophic. In contrast I've seen the aftermath of many metal frame breaks and they've all been the sheared off head tube variety with, I suppose you could call, catastrophic failures of the tube(s) and under examination it's a clean fast break. I've never seen a carbon handlebar break that wasn't the victim of some horrible garage crash but I have seen aluminum handlebars sheared at the stem clamp; that's actually terrifying.

    The reason I bring up metal is that I get tired of everyone blasting in about how carbon explodes when you look at it crossways; it just doesn't. So I always say that if you are scared of carbon breaking you should be aware that metal parts are just as susceptible to failure. When you go spouting things like carbon fails catastrophically without quantifying the statement in any way, well, you're wrong and then my eyes turn red and I go on a rant irrespective of the topic at hand.

    Carbon is very damage tolerant but (here's the part where we go back to the long since abandoned OP's post) if the manufacturer doesn't control their process or doesn't use appropriate materials then you can't say for sure exactly what you're getting. This is why so many people, 5 months ago, said to avoid the knock-off carbon parts.
    I in no way spouted that it fails catastrophically the article did I said it fails instantly of which was one of many pieces that I have read that I was sharing that's all. If you Care to read what I wrote I said that baring what you and the other chap said this is something that I will have to revise and go back and look at so stop spouting yourself about what I am saying. Not that I require it but I dont see any scientific evidence in your statements either.

    The main evidence that I have gone off always is that in their final states alloys have a certain small property to be slightly malleable hence they bend before failure carbon is not and ergo more brittle and even though it may take an absurd amount of energy it will not bend it will simply snap. There's your science that I based my comment off.

    So yes let's get back on subject shall we and sincerely thanks for your incite into carbon, and I will be revising my own thoughts and not be so quick in future to believe what I read even though the source is known to be reliable.



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    Cool Starry Bra!

    In all seriousness, this topic has be covered to death.

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