1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #1
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    Carbon frame assembly

    So my new bike is on the way and I'm super excited. It's a diamond back overdrive carbon expert, my first carbon frame and my first 29er. I've ridden and worked on bikes for over 10 years, but I don't have any experience dealing with carbon fiber. The bike has an aluminum seatpost and a carbon frame. I've read and it seem like carbon assembly paste is the first choice for the seat tube, and in a pinch I could use grease, does that sound right? or would grease be preferable for a carbon/aluminum interface?

    Also I haven't dealt with hydraulic disc brakes on a bike in a few years. I'm thinking that the brakes will come pre-bled and ready to go, and if they're not, the lever will be squishy/not firm right?

    I figure I'll make sure the headset got greased, but it's got a sram pf30 bottom bracket, can they be serviced? is it worth trying to pull it apart to grease the bearings in it?

    Seeing as this is my first new bike in a while, I'd like to do what I can to protect the frame/paint from scratches and dings, any suggestions on how?

    I appreciate any and all help, I hope to post pics and a review once I get some miles on it.

  2. #2
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    Congrats on the new bike.
    I'm assuming you brought the bike complete and assembled.
    I wouldn't put grease on a seat post, use carbon paste. A little sachet will go a long way and are cheap to buy.

    The brakes should be pre bled and ready to go, may need to be bedded in. ( Did they feel squishy when you tried the bike out).

    If the bike is brand new it should be all greased up and ready to ride?

    For frame protection I used helicopter tape on the front of the down tube, the back of the seat tube, around the headtube junction where all the cables rub and a bit on the rear triangle where the brake cable rubs when the suspension moves.

    The tape is a pain to put on but does a good job.

    Have fun on the new bike

  3. #3
    Redcoat
    Reputation: Brockwan's Avatar
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    Carbon frame assembly

    I know I'm not the only one but I have never needed carbon paste.

    Also it's imperative that you use a torque wrench of some sort and don't over tighten.

    Enjoy your new ride, let us know how she goes.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Last edited by Brockwan; 01-08-2014 at 01:53 AM.

  4. #4
    Fat-tired Roadie
    Reputation: AndrwSwitch's Avatar
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    Never assume. If you're buying online, check everything. Park Tool has a new bike build checklist that's excellent. You probably won't have to do everything on the list, but you should at least make sure it has been done.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  5. #5
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    It's coming from the DB factory, they say it's 80% assembled, so I'm assuming the derailleurs will be on, and possibly the cranks. I figure most of what I'll need to do is deal with the bars/controls, put the wheels on and maybe set up the brakes, true the wheels a bit and of course make sure everything is tight and lubed.

  6. #6
    Redcoat
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    Carbon frame assembly

    Yeah it's only been disassembled to mail in the smallest package possible. It should be lubed already but it never hurts to lube again. Pedals, wheels, bars and away you go mate.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

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