1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
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2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
Results 1 to 18 of 18
  1. #1
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    Carbon fiber frame vs Titanum vs Aluminum

    Hi guys,
    If weight is not a relatively major concern (I am not racing) what would be the advantage of carbon fiber frame over other lightweight frames (Ti & Al)...

    Does carbon fiber bikes resits to accidents? in other terms, I am afraid to invest on a carbon fiber frame and end up by throwing it... in this respect I believe that Al frame is more reliable / repairable. plz advise.

  2. #2
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    Carbon frames are repairable too - IF you know what you're doing.

    Example


    After


    -S

  3. #3
    IoC
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nakkoush View Post
    Hi guys,
    If weight is not a relatively major concern (I am not racing) what would be the advantage of carbon fiber frame over other lightweight frames (Ti & Al)...

    Does carbon fiber bikes resits to accidents? in other terms, I am afraid to invest on a carbon fiber frame and end up by throwing it... in this respect I believe that Al frame is more reliable / repairable. plz advise.
    IMO, a lot any advantage comes down to quality of the frame. Santa Cruz shows a video of them slamming a carbon Nomad frame into a concrete corner with little damage, but a buddy of mine destroyed a cheap, generic eBay-special carbon frame on a 1' drop.

    Given a good level of quality, I think the main differences you'll find are:

    1. Carbon's stiffer where it counts, but gives bit where you need compliance
    2. Aluminum is going to beat you up more than carbon or ti
    3. Ti's going to have a great ride, but can be less stiff that carbon

    If I had a choice between them and wanted an all-around bike I could hammer for an hour or ride all day, I'd go with good ti.

    Quote Originally Posted by Nakkoush View Post
    Does carbon fiber bikes resits to accidents?
    Had a crash in August that put me in the hospital for six days. All I had to fix on my bike (carbon Santa Cruz Tallboy) was straightening the handlebar back out.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by shibiwan View Post
    Carbon frames are repairable too - IF you know what you're doing.

    Example


    After


    -S
    Can such a repair (carbon fiber fracture, not talking about the sandpapering and spraying) be achieved in the house?

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nakkoush View Post
    Can such a repair (carbon fiber fracture, not talking about the sandpapering and spraying) be achieved in the house?
    Maybe, but you will need the right tools and the knowledge to do it,, so very likely no. Just like you could repair Titanium, Steel or Aluminum in your garage, if you had the knowledge, skill, and tools to do so.

    To your statement of aluminum being more reparable, the answer is a Nope. You can "band-aid" an aluminum frame by re-welding it, but it will only be at around 30% of its original strength, unless you get the frame re-heat treated. Aluminum and scandium both require heat treatment post-weld to cause the crystalline structure of the metal to re-align for strength. Without this heat treatment the frame is substantially weaker. Titanium and Steel do not require this additional post weld step.

    Here are some ref threads, (mtbr's search engine sucks, google is your friend )
    Titanium, Carbon, or Steel? Looking for a lightweight, durable hardtail-
    School me on Ti vs. Carbon frames
    Vibration/Bump Absorption: Carbon vs. Alloy vs. Titanium vs. Steel vs. Scandium vs...
    Titanium vs. Carbon pros and cons?
    Ti Vs. Carbon
    Steel vs. Ti

    I have chimed in on a few of these threads, I am a Titanium devotee.
    My Bike: FORM Cycles Titanium Prevail 29er

    "Any wheel size is better than sitting at a computer all day." -Myself

  6. #6
    Beer Me!
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    One more note, watch this video, it will change your mind about the durablity of carbon, it changed mine:
    My Bike: FORM Cycles Titanium Prevail 29er

    "Any wheel size is better than sitting at a computer all day." -Myself

  7. #7
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    I've owed Steel Al ,Ti and Carbon bikes. I 've broken Steel ,Al ,and TI. The Steel was replaced ,the Al was replaced ,the Ti was repaired. Havn't broke the Carbon yet ,only had it for a year and half.

  8. #8
    IoC
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    Heh, that's the video I was referring to...

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nakkoush View Post
    Hi guys,
    If weight is not a relatively major concern (I am not racing) what would be the advantage of carbon fiber frame over other lightweight frames (Ti & Al)...

    Does carbon fiber bikes resits to accidents? in other terms, I am afraid to invest on a carbon fiber frame and end up by throwing it... in this respect I believe that Al frame is more reliable / repairable. plz advise.

    Nowadays, it's not really what anymore is how they made it. Who is important too more experience builder can really make your bike ride like the way you want.

  10. #10
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    Just my own opinion, but I will say you need to drink a lot of cheap "beer" before you can really appreciate really well age "wine".

    Just get a decent bike for now and learn what you like and then when you achieve a more deserning taste by whatever your desire, you will enjoy it a lot more than way..

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by patineto View Post
    Just my own opinion, but I will say you need to drink a lot of cheap "beer" before you can really appreciate really well age "wine".

    Just get a decent bike for now and learn what you like and then when you achieve a more deserning taste by whatever your desire, you will enjoy it a lot more than way..
    I like that, not necessary agree but in my own way I'd take a heavier bike out over the lighter ones because I might appreciate the light bike when I take it out. Does not usually work but I still do it.


    Sent from my iPhone 4s using Tapatalk

  12. #12
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    I opt for Aluminum best compromise between all 3 Materials.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by shibiwan View Post
    Carbon frames are repairable too - IF you know what you're doing.

    Example


    After


    -S
    Wow awsome job!
    There....Are... Four...Lights!

  14. #14
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    Aluminum is the cheapest material, After that, Titanium and Carbon are a tossup. Both can be as expensive as the other, but the big difference is that titanium flexes (part of what makes it somewhat desirable). A titanium frame that is trying to skimp on weight may very well have the flexiest pedaling experience you will ever have.

    Steel is definitely a choice you left out. In competent hands, the only serious difference between the materials (alu, steel, titanium, and carbon) is the size of the frame tubing and a sleight weight advantage. Each has a unique ride quality, as well, but generally speaking, aluminum translates vibration well, while the other materials are more mellow.

  15. #15
    CSC
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    Carbon is only as good as the resin holding it together...and by that I mean, you would want to be a bit more careful when transporting a carbon frame, as scratches will, over time, degrade the integrity of the frame. It is a strong, rigid material, though. Also, the post with the S-Works patch job is just that, a patch. Show me the strength-test numbers on a patched frame, and I'll believe that the frame's as good as new. Darn impressive, though...almost looks like a brand-new frame!

  16. #16
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    CroMo, carbon, titanium, and alum are all fine. Dollar for dollar a well made 6061, 7005, 7050 alum frame is the way to go imo if not racing. Vibration worries are for rodies.

  17. #17
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    This type of question probably does not belong in the Beginners Corner forum. Although the advice given here may be accurate, I would pose this question...

    Bike and Frame discussion - Mtbr Forums or Frame Building - Mtbr Forums
    "I think im gonna go to walmart and look at the mountain bikes and see if i can salvage the rear frame."- Nick_Knipp 3/21/12

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by S_Trek View Post
    Wow awsome job!
    Yeah, these guys do a great job.
    Carbon Fiber Bike Frame Repair

    -S

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