1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
mtn. biking 101
2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
Results 1 to 11 of 11
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Posts
    5

    Cannondale Trail 7 Upgrades

    New to the sport/hobby. I got a killer deal on the bike. $425 new but it's a 26 in. I broke the rear cassette in 5 mins of the first ride. The second ride I broke the derailleur and the large sprocket or whatever you call it. I replace the cassette and the derailleur. Removed the sprocket. I was thinking about just replacing it with a chain guard. Thoughts? Also I feel like the forks are to soft and I don't think I can adjust them. Any thoughts on an upgrade without breaking the bank. Any other information will help.

    Thanks.

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    5,545
    You must be venturing off the bike path that bike was spec'ed for.
    The fork has no rebound damping and is just a greased spring boat anchor.
    I would save for a bike that matches better the level of use you want. Otherwise your killer deal will end up at $1500.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Posts
    5
    I'm ok with spending money. Like I said I just got I to the sport. I tried out the free ride park and enjoyed it. I just want to upgraded the forks. I know the components aren't the best on the bike. The rear cassette cracked switching gears. The derailleur cracked along with the front sprocket on a fall. Not on something the bike wasn't spec'd for.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    5,545
    Quote Originally Posted by Jredshields View Post
    I'm ok with spending money. Like I said I just got I to the sport. I tried out the free ride park and enjoyed it. I just want to upgraded the forks. I know the components aren't the best on the bike. The rear cassette cracked switching gears. The derailleur cracked along with the front sprocket on a fall. Not on something the bike wasn't spec'd for.
    Take this to the All Mountain section for more opinions. You want to have fun and you have the terrain available to do it. You need the right tool. That bike is not it.

    Even with a $200 Epicon fork off ebay, which is 10x better than what you have, you will not be setup for that park. Everything will need changing and then the frame will crack.

    This is you...
    Canfield Brothers Nimble 9 on Vimeo

    minimum

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    530
    ^^ that's right.

    Even the geometry is wrong for a free ride park.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Posts
    5
    Ok. What should I buy that would be best for both worlds? 95% of my riding is on the trails. I only hit the free ride park for 1 or 2 passes.

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    5,545
    You say that now.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Posts
    5
    Seriously I like the trails. The rush of the free ride is great but I'm out there fore the work out. Would the forks you named earlier work? I live in Pittsburgh the free ride park was nothing crazy. I don't know how it compares but there is only one little section and it's only about a minute ride. So it's really not worth repeating over and over.

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    5,545
    You need a straight 1-1/8" steerer, 100mm travel 9mm dropout fork.

    It seems the currently available Epicons on ebay may be lower quality Chinese domestic only versions. So avoid them.
    Last edited by eb1888; 4 Weeks Ago at 07:48 AM.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    530
    The Trail 7 is adequate for fire roads and hiking trails where you can take the kids. It's not suitable for slamming into stuff. That would be jumps drops of more than a foot, rocks and roots at speed, etc. Speed equates to force and that bike will tolerate only so much impact force.

    BTW one man's "totally insane" is another man's "nothing crazy."

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation: AE Beej's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    243
    then buy a new bike that is geared toward trail riding if you are OK with spending money. your bike you have now is for paved roads, bike paths, and light gravel/dirt. Not roots, rocks, jumps, constant hits, etc...

Similar Threads

  1. Upgrades for cannondale rush 400?
    By ncdirtbuster in forum Beginner's Corner
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 09-21-2014, 02:27 AM
  2. 2014 Cannondale Trail 4 Upgrades
    By n.hetrick28 in forum Cannondale
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 07-19-2014, 11:35 PM
  3. 2013 Cannondale Trail SL 2 (26er) or 2014 Cannondale Trail 5 (29er)
    By quickmammoth in forum Beginner's Corner
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 07-06-2014, 09:02 AM
  4. Upgrades for Cannondale Bad Boy
    By goldtop in forum Drivetrain - shifters, derailleurs, cranks
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 08-27-2013, 02:23 PM
  5. 1991 Cannondale SM 500 upgrades
    By sourdoughsam in forum Vintage, Retro, Classic
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 10-07-2011, 11:11 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •