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  1. #1
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    New question here. Cannondale M800-Beast of the east - Is this bike good for $200?

    I am a newbie and trying to get into biking mostly for fitness/fun. After going through few posts, mtbr'er recommends to get a good used bike rather than new walmart bikes.


    What do you guys suggests? Is it worth it? (I believe these are pretty old bikes). Did a few google-ing and looks like these were very popular in their days ( and somewhat even now).

    Thanks for any suggestions!

    My budget is tight.. around <=200.
    Last edited by Ginnie; 03-11-2014 at 09:51 AM.

  2. #2
    AZ
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    If it fits go for it.

  3. #3
    B A N N E D
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    What condition is the fork in ?

    That bike might end up costing you more then $200

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    doublepost.

  5. #5
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    I am going to look at it tomorrow and hopefully it is fine. How do we gauge in what condition the fork is beside looking for cracks/rust? thank you for pointing this out, I will check it out.
    sorry, this will be my first bike and don't have much knowledge about them beside reading in mtbr. Any suggestions on how we know forks are good/bad? Thanks!

  6. #6
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    Re: Cannondale M800-Beast of the east - Is this bike good for $200?

    I had those tires! And those are some amazing bar ends...

    What kind of riding do you want to do?

    A good check with any bike is to squeeze the front brake and try to rock the bike fore and aft. There may be a little flex but there shouldn't be any klunking. Make sure the rear brake works too.

    You might also try holding the wheel between your knees and twisting the handlebars. Don't twist too hard, wheels aren't really meant to be strong in this direction. But it could give you some insight.

    The price is a little tricky for me. I think it's high, though. Cantilever brakes aren't exactly the current standard, neither is 7-speed, and that looks like a threaded headset. This thing is old, and you'd better be comfortable with maintaining it period - if you get the upgrade bug, it'll be a big pain and open up Pandora's box to try to update anything. Just replacing things that wear out shouldn't be a big deal, in general, although those chain rings are likely to be a special order item. They tend to last a very long time, though.

    What else... ride around and shift through all the gears. Try climbing something out of the saddle. Measure the chain for "stretch." (Google it; I'm typing with my thumbs.)
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  7. #7
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    That bike is really dated, the asking price is too high. Will require a lot more $$$ to make it current if that's what you're looking into.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by DiRt DeViL View Post
    That bike is really dated, the asking price is too high. Will require a lot more $$$ to make it current if that's what you're looking into.
    I think that bikes is probably worth more as a retro/collector type item than someting to actually hit the trails on.
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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by slapheadmofo View Post
    I think that bikes is probably worth more as a retro/collector type item than someting to actually hit the trails on.
    Agree

  10. #10
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    Thanks for your opinion guys! I have decided to pass on this based on unknown "risk" factors for such old/retro/collector bikes. I am hoping something will turn up in CL soon!
    Thanks!

  11. #11
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    How tall are you? Inseam?

  12. #12
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    I have a buddy still riding a ~'93 M600. Nice, lightweight handbuilt American frame. It's a sweet bike, but I much prefer my bike. He has ridden mine and is looking to upgrade to a 29er soon. They're nice, but I wouldn't look to ride it day in and day out on the trails.

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  14. #14
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    I see you have decided against it but anyways - Cannondales are known for cracking. Check very carefully. Almost always cracked below the seat pinch bolt.

  15. #15
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    Re: Cannondale M800-Beast of the east - Is this bike good for $200?

    Quote Originally Posted by Ginnie View Post
    Thanks for your opinion guys! I have decided to pass on this based on unknown "risk" factors for such old/retro/collector bikes. I am hoping something will turn up in CL soon!
    Thanks!
    Probably the right decision.

    Some things to look for to help you choose something a little easier to maintain -

    Look for at least an 8-speed cassette.
    V-brakes are better than cantilevers. Most disc brakes are better than most v-brakes, and switching from Vs to discs can be a major project, so choose a bike that already has a system you'll be comfortable living with.
    Look for at least a 1-1/8" threadless headset. The easiest way to recognize these is by looking at the stem. Bikes with threadless headsets have stems that clamp onto the steer tube. They'll have two cap screws on the back, facing sideways. Look down on a stem for a threadless headset and you'll understand how it works.

    Good luck! It can take a little patience to do it this way, but you can get a lot of bike for your dollar.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by moefosho View Post
    moefosho, thanks for these. One of them is not replying given that its older post ( Trek 3500). Trek 8000 is not there anymore.

    I am a complete newbie, looking for a bike mainly for exercise purposes, 60-70% paved, every now and then on trails (for beginners) for fun. Might get serious later.

    BTW, I am 5ft 7 and inseam 30.

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