1. The most important thing about buying a new bike is to make sure it fits. The only way you'll know if the bike is right for you is to size up the bike and make sure that the bike's geometry matches your body's geometry. Ask questions and do some research.
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2. If possible, try to find a shop that will let you demo the bike on real dirt. Five minutes in a parking lot won't cut it. You wouldn't buy a car without a real world test drive, and a bike should be no different.
3. Don't belive the hype. Just because your favorite rider or best friend rides a certain bike, that doesn't mean that's the best one for you. Have an open mind and be realistic about your needs and ability.
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  1. #1
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    buying a new bicyle

    are you automatically considered a d-bag if you ask for a discount? I suppose i can get it from competitive cyclist? 650b hit me bad.

    Any tips on getting best return for hard earned $? is there a specific time of year to purchae?

    considering santa cruz, intense, pivot or ibs.











    /

  2. #2
    I like pie.
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    Quote Originally Posted by inteligencia View Post
    are you automatically considered a d-bag if you ask for a discount? I suppose i can get it from competitive cyclist? 650b hit me bad.

    Any tips on getting best return for hard earned $? is there a specific time of year to purchae?

    considering santa cruz, intense, pivot or ibs.











    /
    So the first question to consider is why are you worthy of a discount? Have you an established relationship with your LBS?You've done enough business with the shop to the point where the boss says yes to discounts? You do realize the LBS is a business and has to support a family. If you and other folk say all I care about is getting bike at a price point that is a loss to the LBS, what do you think will be the end result?

    Pay a fair price. If you don't want to then maybe you should not be in this sport.

  3. #3
    Hi There!
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    I recently bought a new bike from a shop I'd never been to before because they were the ones that sold the brand I was buying. I didn't consider asking for a discount being it was my first time there. After not asking, and going thru the ordering process and getting to know them they gave me $75 off MSRP. They have me as a customer for good as far as I can tell, not because of the discount but because they are super-good folks.
    NTFTC

  4. #4
    My little friends
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    You can sometimes get a better deal on "last year's model", especially if there are some changes to the latest version.

  5. #5
    IoC
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    Quote Originally Posted by inteligencia View Post
    considering santa cruz, intense, pivot or ibs.
    The smaller shops that sell those brands I've delt with have generally sold me bikes at MSRP but give a discount on further purchases. I bought my TallboyC at full price last year but have more than made up any 'online discount' I may have gotten from competitive cyclist or cambria, on discounted labor, parts, etc.

  6. #6
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    It's a business, they're trying to sell bikes, and you're trying to get the best deal for your money. I don't know if I'd necessarily phrase it as a "discount", but I'd haggle with them a little. I've spent some time in the Middle East, and it's interesting the different cultural norms when it comes to buying/selling. Over there, you haggle for everything, including the taxi ride to the market.

    Anyway, if I were you, I'd do some research to figure out what a "fair" price is, and make an honest assessment of what you think you should pay. Ordering online is almost always going to be cheaper, but you do have to figure in the customer service part. Your LBS is going to help get the bike set up for you, answer all of your questions, and most likely offer some free minor maintenance if you have any issues down the road. One other thing I picked up from my short time in the Middle East is the importance of actually getting to know the people you're doing business with. I'd generally know the shopkeeper's name, how many kids he had and what his favorite breakfast food was before I left the shop.

    So, my two cents is you should by all means try to work out a deal. If I'm going to buy a car, I don't take the first offer I'm given, and some bikes these days cost almost as much as a car. Believe me, they know what their profit margin is, and how much they're willing to eat into it in order to make a sale. You're not taking food out of their children's mouths if you try to get a lower price than what's on the sticker.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr5150 View Post
    So the first question to consider is why are you worthy of a discount? Have you an established relationship with your LBS?You've done enough business with the shop to the point where the boss says yes to discounts? You do realize the LBS is a business and has to support a family. If you and other folk say all I care about is getting bike at a price point that is a loss to the LBS, what do you think will be the end result?

    Pay a fair price. If you don't want to then maybe you should not be in this sport.
    Hey tone down your elitist tone a little bit. i try to avoid my LBS at all cost and only order on line. Its the attitude i encounter. ive purchased a ton of bikes for my wife and 4 kids at this shop. Bikes and accessories including a trailer for our dog. My has and frankly our finances are not in order.

    for our fifteen wedding anniversary she is surprising me with a "surprise". The money is coming from her dad.

    Heck, ive been ridimg a raleigh 1998 and i can out run most of the bike shop snoots around here!

    i would say as far as you to my special friend.
    Last edited by inteligencia; 06-12-2013 at 06:16 PM.

  8. #8
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    i like your style

    Quote Originally Posted by IoC View Post
    The smaller shops that sell those brands I've delt with have generally sold me bikes at MSRP but give a discount on further purchases. I bought my TallboyC at full price last year but have more than made up any 'online discount' I may have gotten from competitive cyclist or cambria, on discounted labor, parts, etc.

  9. #9
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    thanks for a different persspective!

    Quote Originally Posted by IslandCrow View Post
    It's a business, they're trying to sell bikes, and you're trying to get the best deal for your money. I don't know if I'd necessarily phrase it as a "discount", but I'd haggle with them a little. I've spent some time in the Middle East, and it's interesting the different cultural norms when it comes to buying/selling. Over there, you haggle for everything, including the taxi ride to the market.

    Anyway, if I were you, I'd do some research to figure out what a "fair" price is, and make an honest assessment of what you think you should pay. Ordering online is almost always going to be cheaper, but you do have to figure in the customer service part. Your LBS is going to help get the bike set up for you, answer all of your questions, and most likely offer some free minor maintenance if you have any issues down the road. One other thing I picked up from my short time in the Middle East is the importance of actually getting to know the people you're doing business with. I'd generally know the shopkeeper's name, how many kids he had and what his favorite breakfast food was before I left the shop.

    So, my two cents is you should by all means try to work out a deal. If I'm going to buy a car, I don't take the first offer I'm given, and some bikes these days cost almost as much as a car. Believe me, they know what their profit margin is, and how much they're willing to eat into it in order to make a sale. You're not taking food out of their children's mouths if you try to get a lower price than what's on the sticker.

  10. #10
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    A good bike shop will give a discount to the buyer to create a returning customer. It is the returning customer that helps pay the day to day bills and pay the service employees when people come in for parts, service, and upgrades. There is much more profit to be made in those areas anyway.

    I tell my friends to treat it like buying a new car. Research prices, research other bikes. Come in with an idea of what you are willing to pay. Offer a bit below that and see if you can come to an agreement. Understand that you will be paying more than online (most of the time) but you usually get some good stuff, like free services, and a relationship with the shop.
    2008 Redline Monocog 29er SS/Rigid
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  11. #11
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    What I've done in the pasted is basically been very upfront right at the start.
    The shop I currently deal with, I happen to be dealing with the owner and flat out said " I really try to support local small business, but you have to understand I just can't be giving money away. Would you be insulted if I came to you first with a price on something and give you an opportunity to come close? I'm not asking to match, because I know it's not realistic, but if you're close I'd rather give my money to you than an internet vendor in some other state."

    Has always worked for me. Got $500 off my first bike with them, the 2012 Stumpjumper, and I don't want to say too much because I don't anyone who puts 2 and 2 together, but I got a lot more than that off my TBc from them.

    A lot of the parts I've bought have ended up only being a few bucks more and now I can go there any time I need some help.

    Same approached worked over 10 years ago when I first got into mountain biking.
    13 Lenz Lunchbox punkass
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  12. #12
    Lindsay
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    Here i a new trick for you. on demo days, ive read manufacturers are offering special pricing. i live in laguna beach,ca. there is a shop that automatically gives 5% discount on all new mountain bike purchases. its frequented by a riding local legend. I've never asked for a discount, its always been part of the purchase.

    I hope your wife is okay.

  13. #13
    Hi There!
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    Quote Originally Posted by inteligencia View Post
    Hey tone down your elitist tone a little bit. i try to avoid my LBS at all cost and only order on line.

    So order online and don't worry about asking your LBS for a discount.

    My wife has cancer and frankly our finances are not in order.

    Then why are you buying such an expensive bike in the first place?

    for our fifteen wedding anniversary she is surprising me with a "surprise". The money is coming from her dad.

    So your father-in-law is buying you an expensive 15th anniversary gift? And you're okay with that, even though your finances aren't in order?
    .
    I too hope your wife will be okay.
    NTFTC

  14. #14
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    most manufacturers set a lowest price for a product and retailers are not to sell below that price unless the manufacturer authorizes a sale. so most shops in your area are going to sell the same product for roughly the same price.

    visit a few shops and see which one offers the best service with the bike to set them apart. which shop seems to have the most knowledgeable and helpful staff? do you get any sort of free mechanical support and service with the purchase of a bike? does the shop support and organize rides, races, and other events? does the shop offer a fitting service by a qualified fitter? how does your shop deal with warranties? how long can you have your bike/product and return it without hassle? what is their turnaround time on repairs?

    the shop where I very recently worked offers a 30-day, no questions asked return policy, unlimited free professional fit services, lifetime free basic mechanical services for your bike, and 48 hour or faster turnaround on repairs. the business is thriving, the customers are happy, and the employees love their jobs. I am only leaving there because I am moving out of state.

    you probably won't get an outright discount from you LBS, but if you get any or all of the above services with your bike, those freebies will pay for themselves very quickly.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by inteligencia View Post
    i would say as far as you to my special friend.
    what?

  16. #16
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    Why would anyone care more about someone else's bottom line (ie the bike shop owner) more than their own? They're in business to separate me from my money, I'm in business to make my money go as far as possible. it's strictly business; there is no 'bro code' when it comes to shelling out money for no good reason if you can get the same thing for less.

    There is some validity to the idea of paying a premium at a shop if they're going to throw in some free service that you're not able to do yourself, but in most cases, I find it's better to get the hardgoods as cheap as possible and install them myself. No matter how complicated a lot of people here like to make them seem, bikes are very simple machines, with just a few moving parts. Anyone with a little patience, a few specialized tools and an internet connection should be able to do 90% of their own work.

    When it comes to bikes, retail is for suckers.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by slapheadmofo View Post
    When it comes to bikes, retail is for suckers.
    i agree that most people would be better off buying parts cheap and working on their own bikes, and a lot of people do. bicycle co-ops where you can borrow tools and work space are a great resource for the new DIY mechanic.

    however, many people don't have time to work on their bikes. they just want the bike to work and don't give a flying fig how it works. if you have a family and work 50 hours a week and drive in gridlocked traffic for 1.5 hour each way to and from work 5 days a week, you don't want to fiddle around with your squeaking Avid Elixir 1's or take a crash course in replacing the seals in your Fox RP23 during that 2 hours per week when you get to sneak in a ride. you just want to go ride!

    others are hopelessly lost when it comes to mechanical aptitude, and I think that is getting worse. I volunteer with a local co-op and the number of young men (and ladies) who cannot tell the difference between a flat and a phillips screwdriver is astounding! i have met people who have been avid riders for decades who just stare at you blankly when you ask them about their fork. "what's a 'fork?'" I have watched adult men become paralyzed when I tell them to turn a wrench counter-clockwise, as if they don't know what direction a clock turns. maybe the don't. there is a learning curve but some people are virtually helpless.

    for the time-crunched and the mechanically inept, paying more at a bike shop is a worthwhile way to pay for the time and skills they don't have.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by EABiker View Post
    You can sometimes get a better deal on "last year's model", especially if there are some changes to the latest version.
    I Agree, sometimes you can find "last year's" model for less than the current one. Another option is that you can find used bikes that are in near perfect condition for usually great prices. Couple seasons ago I went to one of our local shops and they would have been glad to sell me a new Diamondback Sortie 1 for $1,600... I went home and sourced a 1 year old Sortie 1 in perfect condition and got it for $500 shipped.

    Before you try to save a small fraction of the cost of a new bike, check out some used stuff.

  19. #19
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    http://www.nytimes.com/2013/06/03/bu...rial.html?_r=0

    Open trials for this drug to use your immune system have been promising. Good luck.

  20. #20
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    great buy on your bike. good work! how are your brakes performing? i demo ridden a spesh fsr comp stumpjumper and i felt an issue with brakes? 2013.

    Quote Originally Posted by TwoTone View Post
    What I've done in the pasted is basically been very upfront right at the start.
    The shop I currently deal with, I happen to be dealing with the owner and flat out said " I really try to support local small business, but you have to understand I just can't be giving money away. Would you be insulted if I came to you first with a price on something and give you an opportunity to come close? I'm not asking to match, because I know it's not realistic, but if you're close I'd rather give my money to you than an internet vendor in some other state."

    Has always worked for me. Got $500 off my first bike with them, the 2012 Stumpjumper, and I don't want to say too much because I don't anyone who puts 2 and 2 together, but I got a lot more than that off my TBc from them.

    A lot of the parts I've bought have ended up only being a few bucks more and now I can go there any time I need some help.

    Same approached worked over 10 years ago when I first got into mountain biking.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by inteligencia View Post
    great buy on your bike. good work! how are your brakes performing? i demo ridden a spesh fsr comp stumpjumper and i felt an issue with brakes? 2013.
    My brakes are performing wonderfully. They are XTs on my Tallboy. I hated the brakes on my SJ. Nothing to say other than they sucked. I will never own Avids brakes again.
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  22. #22
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    Minimum advertised price for most companies is 10% below MSRP. You should feel comfortable asking for this rate. It's pretty much the standard here in competitive SoCal.

    Other option is to wait for the end of the year clearance of current year bikes. Shops have to make room and $$$ available for the new years model. I picked up my TB LTC at 40% just after Black Friday. The shop is doing fine as I utilize them for any service that I am unable to complete on my own.

  23. #23
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    After you select the model just politely ask if they can do something with the price, that has worked well for me in shops that I've never been before; the ones that know me always give me a discount and the one I worked for always gave me the stuff at their cost.

  24. #24
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    buying a new bicyle

    I have a LBS that I go to for all the repairs only current bike. I live in a military town, so my first visit I asked if they had a military discount, and explained that I'm not active duty (painfully obvious if you've ever seen me) but I am 100% disabled. He now gives me a 10% discount on any parts I buy in the store. The manager has also gone out of his way to help me out, and has done a lot of silly little stuff for me for free. They sell Specialized and Trek, and if I don't do a ground up build, I'll buy from them, most likely a Carve or Stache 7. If I have to pay MSRP I'm okay with that, they've taken good care of me so far, and I don't see that changing if I buy a bike from them.


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